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Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 16 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 16, No 2 (2011)" : 16 Documents clear
Response of laying performance of KUB chicken to dietary protein given during growing period Hidayat, Cecep; Iskandar, S.; Sartika, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 16, No 2 (2011)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i2.637

Abstract

One hundred and sixty KUB pullets of 22 weeks of age (KUB = Kampung chicken selected for egg production) were previously raised on different dietary protein level during starter-grower period. During starting period, chicks (0-12 weeks of age) were given dietary protein of: 16% crude protein, CP (R1); 17.5% CP (R2); 19% CP (R3); 20.5% CP (R4); 22% CP (R5). All dietary treatments were iso-energy of 2800 kcal ME (metabolisable energy)/kg. During growing period (12-22 weeks) each group of treatment chick was divided into two regimes of dietary protein levels. One was subjected to the same as treatments given during starting period, and the other one was given diet with reduced dietary protein content up to 1.5%. The treatments were R1-1, having dietary protein of 16.0%; R1-2, having dietary protein of 14.5%; R2-1, having dietary protein of 17.5%; R2-2, having dietary protein of 16.0%; R3-1, having dietary protein of 19.0%; R3-2, having dietary protein of 17.5%; R4-1, having dietary protein of 20.5%; R4-2, having dietary protein of 19.0%; R5-1, having dietary protein of 22% and R5-2, having dietary protein of 20.5%. The energy content of all dietary treatments was the same for all treatments 2800 kkal ME/kg. The hens were then grouped into the treatment as the treatment groups of growing period of 12-22 weeks. Hens were then raised on laying diet, containing 17.11% CP (crude protein) with 2728 kcal ME/kg. The results showed that the change of dietary treatment, given during growing period, influenced (P < 0,05) first lay weight, first egg weight,  weight gain, egg weight, egg width, egg volume of KUB hens age of 22-42 weeks. And the dietary protein treatment, given during starter and growing period, influenced (P < 0.05) first lay body weight, first lay age, feed consumption, egg weight, egg length, egg width of KUB hens age of 22-42 weeks. Key Words: KUB Chicken, Starting and Growing Dietary Protein, Egg Production
Performance, carcass precentages and heterosis values, Alabio and Cihateup line and crossbreeding on eight week old Matitaputty, P.R.; Noor, R.R.; Hardjosworo, P.S.; Wijaya, C.H.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 16, No 2 (2011)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i2.638

Abstract

One effort for improving the productivity of Indonesian local ducks in particular as a meat types is by crossing among the local ducks. Crossbreeding is a fast breeding program for improving some commercial traits. Crossing between two lines or different breed are often used in production systems to utilized the advantage of heterosis (hybrid vigor). Crossbreeding is expected to produce new synthetic strains of duck that perform better than their parents. This study aims to utilize the heterosis and determine best cross, and to study the performance changes due to crossbreeding. The statistical design used in this study was a randomized complete design (RCD) consisting of 4 treatments with 6 replications, each replication consisting of five ducks. The treatments used were the crossing of the pure Cihateup ♂ x Cihateup ♀ (CC), line Alabio ♂ x Alabio ♀ (AA), Alabio ♂ x Cihateup ♀ (AC) cross as well as Cihateup ♂ x Alabio ♀ (CA) cross. This study using male ducklings first hybrid (F1). The results show that the CA is better than AC in the final live weight (7.05%), weight gain (7.32%), carcass weight (9.24%) and carcass yield (2.55%). Fleshy carcass cuts such as breast meat of AA (6.13%) is better when compared to the others, but the highest percentage of meat percentage of the thigh is the AC (10.13%). Duck crossesing CA possess superior properties more and economic value compared with the duck AC. Key Words: Alabio Duck, Cihateup Duck, Crossing, Heterosis, Performance
Effect of Morinda citrifolia leaf as saponin sources on fermentation characteristic, protozoa defaunated, gas and methane production of ruminal fluid in vitro Herdian, Hendra; Istiqomah, L.; Febrisiantosa, A.; Setiabudi, D.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 16, No 2 (2011)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i2.639

Abstract

Many studies have reported that the Morinda citrifolia (pace plant) was a useful material for human health. However the exploration of this plant on rumen fermentation is still needed. Therefore, a research was done to study the effect of M. citrifolia leaf on fermentation characteristics of rumen fluid consisted of protozoa defaunated process, VFA composition, NH3 content, rumen microbial protein content, gas and methane production using in vitro techniques. Rumen fluid obtained from two fistulated Ongole crossbreed cattle fed with forage and concentrate feed ration (70 : 30). The fluid was incubated at 39ºC for 48 hours. The treatment on the rumen fluid consisted of control treatment: 100% (200 mg DM) kolonjono forage substrate (Penisetum purpureum) and M. citrifolia treatments: kolonjono forage plus M. citrifolia (equivalent saponin) 3; 6; 9; and 12 mg DM, respectively. The treatment of M. citrifolia leaf addition showed declined patterns in the number of protozoa population (P < 0.05) compared to control. There was no effect of M. citrifolia treatment on VFA composition and NH3 content (P > 0.05). Microbial protein content in rumen fluid increased (P < 0.05) by M. citrifolia treatments compared to control. Effect of M. citrifolia treatments on the gas production was not significantly different (P > 0.05) compared to control, while M. citrifolia treatments reduced the methane gas production of (P < 0.05) compared to control. It was concluded that M. citrifolia leaf has potential as a limiting agent of protozoa population and methane gas production in rumen. Key words: M. citrifolia, Defaunated, Saponin, In Vitro
Growth respone, production and quality of grass resulted from addition of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and humic acid on acid soil with high aluminium content Manu Hara Karti, Panca Dewi; Setiadi, Y.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 16, No 2 (2011)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i2.640

Abstract

Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can help plant to uptake of low P availability in acid soils because of the ability of AMF to adapt from acid soil. Humic acid plays a role in adsorption metals such as Al. The purpose of this research was to study the effect of addition of AMF and humic acid to acid soils on growth, yield and quality of grass. A complete randomized design with factorial pattern was applied to two types of grasses, namely: Setaria splendida (Al-tolerance) and Chloris gayana (Al-sensitive). The first factor is the addition of AMF, which consists of two levels, namely: -AMF = without AMF. +AMF = with AMF. The second factor was the addition of humic acid which consists of four levels, namely: Ho = without humic acid, H60 = 60 ppm humic acid usage, H120 = 120 ppm humic acid usage and H180 = 180 ppm humic acid usage. Variables measured were dry matter production of shoot and roots, uptake of P and N, the production of phosphatase, root infection, the number of spores. AMF and humic acid augmentation on Setaria splendida did not affect on growth and production, but they improved the uptake of P and N total. AMF augmentation enhanced growth, yield and quality of the Chloris gayana. The use of 180 ppm of humic acid could improve the quality of Setaria splendida and Chloris gayana. Key Words: Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi, Humic Acid, Acid Soil, Setaria splendida, Chloris gayana
Evaluation of genetic diversity of Katingan catlle and their genetic relationship with some other local catlle through DNA microsatellite analysis Ngaji Utomo, Bambang; Noor, R.R.; Sumantri, c.; Supriatna, I; Gurnadi, E.D.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 16, No 2 (2011)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i2.641

Abstract

Katingan cattle is one of Indonesian animal genetic resources located in Katingan District, Central Kalimantan. The Katingan cattle is predicted to be extint, therefore it is necessary to conserve the cattle. Breed characterization is the primary step in any conservation program. Characterization was done using 10 microsatellite markers to evaluate the genetic diversity of Katingan Cattle in three subpopulations and their genetic relationship with some other local cattle. A total number of 72 random whole blood of Katingan samples consisted of Pendahara (20 samples), Buntut Bali (20 samples), and Tumbang Lahang (32 samples) were used. The samples of Bali, PO, and Limousine Cattle were 11, 6, and 3 respectivelly. The number of 136 aleles were found with the variation from 9 aleles (ILSTS089) to 18 aleles (ILSTS013) and the average of the alele was 13.6 aleles per locus. A number of alel from Tumbang Lahang was higher (10.8 aleles) than Pendahara (10.4 aleles) and Buntut Bali subpopulation (7.3 aleles). Some loci produced polymorphic diagnostic aleles which varied from 1-7 types of allele. HEL013 and BM1818 had four aleles, while ILSTS026 and ILSTS089 had five and six aleles respectively. ILSTS029 and ILSTS036 had seven aleles. The diagnostic aleles were also found in Tumbang Lahang subpopulastion, as well as in Pendahara, and Buntut Bali. Heterozigositas values of Pendahara, Buntut Bali, and Tumbang Lahang subpopulation were 0.454, 0.478, and 0.529 respectively. While the average of heterozigositas (Ĥ) was 0.492. Subpopulation of Tumbang Lahang was closer genetically to Pendahara (0.169) than Buntut Bali (0.173) and also the subpopulation was closer genetically to PO cattle (0.259) when compared to Buntut Bali (0.311) and Pendahara (0.329). The population of Katingan cattle was within one kluster with PO Cattle. Key Words: Katingan Cattle, Microsatellite, Genetic Diversity
Growth hormone gene family (GH, GHR, GHRH and Pit-1) polymorphisms and its association with superovulation response, ovulation rate and embryo quality in Embryo Transfer Station (BET) of Cipelang Sumantri, Cece; Imron, M; ., Sugyono; Andreas, E.; Restu, M.; Ishak, A.B.L.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 16, No 2 (2011)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i2.642

Abstract

The decrease in fertility is considered to be the main cause of reproductive loss in dairy cattle and beef industry. Many candidate genes that play an important role in fertility and embryonic development. The purpose of this study was to detect genetic variations of the growth hormone gene family (GH|MspI, GH|AluI, GHR| AluI, GHRH|HaeIII and Pit-1|HinfI) and its association with superovulation response, ovulation, fertilization and transferable embryos rate. A total of 45 blood samples taken from cows that have been superovulated Angus, Brahman, HF, Limousin and Simmental. DNA was extracted with phenol-chloroform protocol followed by polymerase chain reaction technique (PCR) using specific primers for GH, GHR, GHRH and Pit-1 gene. PCR product was cut with restriction enzyme MspI, AluI, HaeIII and HinfI and electrophoresed on agarose gel and stained with ethidium bromide (EtBr). Superovulation is done by injecting a totally of 20 ml FSH for 4 days. Injecting the prostaglandin hormone (PGF2α) was performed on the eleventh day of CIDR implantation. Artificial insemination (AI) performed two or three days after the injection of PGF2α and Flushing was done on the seventh day after the AI.  The results showed that the Angus, Limousin, Brahman and Simental GH loci diversity of GH|MspI, GH|AluI, GHR|AluI, GHRH|HaeIII and Pit-1|HinfI was not associated with superovulation response, ovulation, fertilization and transferable embryo rate. In HF dairy cattle, genotype on Pit-1|HinfI AA has higher percentage of superovulation response (P < 0.05) when compared to AB genotype, but did not differ to BB genotype. Dairy cattle HF AA genotype also had higher ovulation rate (P < 0.05) when compared to AB and BB genotypes, but AB and BB have the same ovulation rate. Key Words: Polymorphisms, Growth Hormone Genes and Reproduction traits.
Characteristic of cow milk dadih using starter of probiotic of lactic acid bacteria Usmiati, Sri; Broto, W.; Setiyanto, H.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 16, No 2 (2011)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i2.643

Abstract

Dadih is an original dairy product from West Sumatera processed traditionally. It is a spontaneous fermentation of buffalo milk at room temperature for 48 hours in a bamboo tube, has no standard of processing and quality. Dadih is potentially to be develop into probiotic products (functional food) that can be enjoyed by the public widely. Development of cows milk dadih is necessary since buffalo milk is available only in certain area. Product and characteristic information of cow milk dadih using probiotic of lactic acid bacteria starter has not been known. The research objective was to determine the characteristics of cow milk dadih that used starter of probiotic lactic acid bacteria during storage at room temperature (27oC) and cold temperature (4oC). The study was designed using a factorial randomized block design pattern 12x3 at room temperature and 12X4 at cold temperatures, with the number of repeatation of 3 times. Treatment consisted of: (i) starter formula (A) using a single bacterium or a combination of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium longum, and (ii) storage time (B). Observed parameters included pH value, titrable acidity, the total plate count, and in-vitro probiotic testing (bacterial resistance to bile salts and low pH) of cow milk dadih. The results showed that L. acidophilus early exponential phase was at the hour 3rd, L. casei at the hour 4th and B. longum on the 3rd of which is used as the optimum time of mixing two or more bacteria in the manufacture of cow milk dadih. The volume of starter used was 3% with time fermentation of 48 hours at room temperature (27-30oC). Cow milk dadih that was stored for 7 days at room temperature (27-30oC) and for 21 days at cold temperatures (4-10oC) was able to maintain viability of bacteria to bile salts and low pH at 1010-1012 cfu/ml with percentage resistance varied. The cow milk dadih using a combination starter of B. longum with other probiotics on the composition of 1:1 had a resistance to bile salts which were relatively constant after the dadih was kept for 21 days at cold temperature. Cow milk dadih with a starter of probiotic bacteria still qualify as a probiotic product with good quality that storaged up to 4 days at room temperature and 21 days in cold temperatures. Key Words:  Dadih, Probiotic, Lactobacillus Acidophilus, Lactobacillus Casei, Bifidobacterium Longum
Protection of avian influenza (AI) vaccines for poultry against infection of field isolates A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 and A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008 under laboratory condition Indriani, Risa; Dharmayanti, N.l.p.I.; Adjid, R.M.A.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 16, No 2 (2011)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i2.644

Abstract

The aim of this research was to study level of protection of avian influenza (AI) commercial vaccines available in Indonesia (subtipe H5N1, H5N2 and H5N9) against infection of HPAI field isolates of A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 and A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008. There were 7 commercial vaccines used in this study, the each vaccines were injected in to 3 weeks old of layer chichickenen intramuscularly. At 3 weeks after vaccination, ten chichickenens from each group were challenged separately with the A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 and A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008 isolates intranasaly with dose 106 ELD50 per 0,1 ml per chicken. Ten unvaccinated chicken were included in the challenge test as control. The study demonstrate that the AI vaccines with subtipe H5N1 protected chicken (100%) against virus of A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 and 90-100% against virus A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008. Viral shedding were not seen by 2 days post challenge. The AI vaccines with subtipe H5N2 protected chicken at 20-30% against virus of A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 and protected chicken at 70-100% against virus of A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008. Viral shedding still detected at 8 days post challenge. The AI vaccines AI with subtipe H5N9 did not protect chicken (0%) against virus A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 and protected chicken at 50% against virus A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008. Viral shedding still detected by 8 days post challenge. This study concluded that AI vaccines with subtipe H5N1 are better than other AI subtipe vaccines in preventing HPAI virus A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 dan A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008 infections under laboratory condition. Key Words: Avian Influenza, Vaccine, Poultry, Chicken
Effect of Morinda citrifolia leaf as saponin sources on fermentation characteristic, protozoa defaunated, gas and methane production of ruminal fluid in vitro Herdian, Hendra; Istiqomah, L.; Febrisiantosa, A.; Setiabudi, D.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 2 (2011): JUNE 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (85.186 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i2.639

Abstract

Many studies have reported that the Morinda citrifolia (pace plant) was a useful material for human health. However the exploration of this plant on rumen fermentation is still needed. Therefore, a research was done to study the effect of M. citrifolia leaf on fermentation characteristics of rumen fluid consisted of protozoa defaunated process, VFA composition, NH3 content, rumen microbial protein content, gas and methane production using in vitro techniques. Rumen fluid obtained from two fistulated Ongole crossbreed cattle fed with forage and concentrate feed ration (70 : 30). The fluid was incubated at 39ºC for 48 hours. The treatment on the rumen fluid consisted of control treatment: 100% (200 mg DM) kolonjono forage substrate (Penisetum purpureum) and M. citrifolia treatments: kolonjono forage plus M. citrifolia (equivalent saponin) 3; 6; 9; and 12 mg DM, respectively. The treatment of M. citrifolia leaf addition showed declined patterns in the number of protozoa population (P < 0.05) compared to control. There was no effect of M. citrifolia treatment on VFA composition and NH3 content (P > 0.05). Microbial protein content in rumen fluid increased (P < 0.05) by M. citrifolia treatments compared to control. Effect of M. citrifolia treatments on the gas production was not significantly different (P > 0.05) compared to control, while M. citrifolia treatments reduced the methane gas production of (P < 0.05) compared to control. It was concluded that M. citrifolia leaf has potential as a limiting agent of protozoa population and methane gas production in rumen. Key words: M. citrifolia, Defaunated, Saponin, In Vitro
Protection of avian influenza (AI) vaccines for poultry against infection of field isolates A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 and A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008 under laboratory condition Indriani, Risa; Dharmayanti, N.l.p.I.; Adjid, R.M.A.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 2 (2011): JUNE 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (117.431 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i2.644

Abstract

The aim of this research was to study level of protection of avian influenza (AI) commercial vaccines available in Indonesia (subtipe H5N1, H5N2 and H5N9) against infection of HPAI field isolates of A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 and A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008. There were 7 commercial vaccines used in this study, the each vaccines were injected in to 3 weeks old of layer chichickenen intramuscularly. At 3 weeks after vaccination, ten chichickenens from each group were challenged separately with the A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 and A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008 isolates intranasaly with dose 106 ELD50 per 0,1 ml per chicken. Ten unvaccinated chicken were included in the challenge test as control. The study demonstrate that the AI vaccines with subtipe H5N1 protected chicken (100%) against virus of A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 and 90-100% against virus A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008. Viral shedding were not seen by 2 days post challenge. The AI vaccines with subtipe H5N2 protected chicken at 20-30% against virus of A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 and protected chicken at 70-100% against virus of A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008. Viral shedding still detected at 8 days post challenge. The AI vaccines AI with subtipe H5N9 did not protect chicken (0%) against virus A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 and protected chicken at 50% against virus A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008. Viral shedding still detected by 8 days post challenge. This study concluded that AI vaccines with subtipe H5N1 are better than other AI subtipe vaccines in preventing HPAI virus A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Pat/2006 dan A/Chicken/West Java/Smi-Mae/2008 infections under laboratory condition. Key Words: Avian Influenza, Vaccine, Poultry, Chicken

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