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Contact Name
Ahmadi Riyanto
Contact Email
medpub@litbang.deptan.go.id
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Journal Mail Official
ahmadi_puslitbangnak@yahoo.com
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Location
Kota bogor,
Jawa barat
INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 18 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 16, No 1 (2011)" : 18 Documents clear
Characteristics of seminal plasma and cryopreservation of anoa (Bubalus sp.) semen obtained by electroejaculation ., Yudi; Yusuf, T.L.; Purwantara, B; Sajuthi, D.; Agil, M
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 16, No 1 (2011)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i1.633

Abstract

The population of anoa, which is an endemic fauna to Indonesia, was getting decrease caused by the illegal hunting and deforestation. Anoa is included in endangered species by IUCN, and Appendix I by CITES. The experiment aimed to characterize the seminal plasma contents and to cryopreserve the anoa semen for artificial insemination application in captivity. The experiment was carried out in Taman Safari Indonesia (Bogor). Semen was collected from 2 anesthetized males (4-10 years) by electroejaculation. Seminal plasma gained by centrifugation of ejaculate (3000 rpm, 20 minutes), and then was evaluated the biochemical contents. Other ejaculates were evaluated macroscopically and microscopically, and then extended in Tris and Na-citrate media to a total concentration of 100 billion cells mL-1. Extended semen was stored at 4oC, and evaluated the motility and viability every 12 h. Frozen semen was made in Tris medium added with 5% of glycerol. The seminal plasma of anoa contained total lipid, Na, Ca and Mg higher than the buffalo, but its total protein, K and Cl were lower. Electrophoresis of seminal plasma using by SDS-PAGE method showed 10 bands of proteins (17-148 kDa). The motility and viability of chilled-extended semen in Tris and Na-citrate media were not significantly different (P > 0.05) during 72 h of evaluation. Extended semen in both of media may applicable for AI program for 24-48 h. Post thawing motility of frozen semen was still low, 26.00 ± 9.62%. Therefore, it is necessary to improve each stages of semen processing, so the motility will increased and resulted high pregnancy in AI program. Key Words: Anoa, Seminal Plasma, Extended Semen, Frozen Semen, Electroejaclator
Fermentation quality and nutritive value of rice crop residue based silage ensiled with addition of epiphytic lactic acid bacteria Santoso, B; Hariadi, B.Tj.; ., Alimuddin; Seseray, D.Y.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 16, No 1 (2011)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i1.628

Abstract

Silage is the feedstuff resulted from the preservation of forages through lactic acid fermentation. The aim of this study was to evaluate nutritive value, fermentation characteristics and nutrients digestibility of rice crop residue based silage ensiled with epiphytic lactic acid bacteria (LAB). The mixture of rice crop residue (RC), soybean curd residue (SC) and cassava waste (CW) in a 90: 5: 5 (on dry matter basis) ratio was used as silage material.  Three treatments silage were (A) RC + SC + CW as a control; (B) RC + SC + CW + LAB inoculums from rice crop residue; (C) RC + SC + CW + LAB inoculums from king grass.  Silage materials were packed into plastic silo (1.5 kg capacity) and stored for 30 days. The results showed that crude protein content in B and C silage was higher than that of silage A, but NDF content in silages B and C was lower than that of silage A.  Lactic acid concentration was higher (P < 0.01) in silage C compared to silage B and A, thus pH value of silage C was lower (P < 0.01) than silage B and A. Silage C had the highest Fleigh point than that of other silages. Dry matter and organic matter digestibilities were higher in silages B and C (P < 0.01) than that of control silage. It was concluded that the addition of LAB inoculums from king grass to rice crop residue based silage resulted a better fermentation quality compared to LAB inoculums from rice crop residue. Key Words: Silage, Rice Crop Residue, Lactic Acid, In Vitro
Use of beluntas, vitamin C and E as an antioxidant for reducing off-odor of Alabio and Cihateup duck meat ., Rukmiasih; Hardjosworo, P.S.; Ketaren, P.P.; Matitaputty, P.R.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 16, No 1 (2011)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i1.629

Abstract

Besides chewy, red in color, duck meat also have a distorted smell (fishy/off-odor). For consumers who are not familiar, the smell is not preferred. Duck meat contains high unsaturated fatty acids. Unsaturated fatty acid is an ingredient which is prone to oxidation. Two strains: Alabio and Cihateup ducks were used in this study, each consist of 3 replications. Four treatments were: 1. Commercial diet without antioxidant (control = K0); 2. Beluntas leaf meal (0.5%) + commercial diet (KB) 3. Beluntas leaf meal (0.5%) + commercial diet + Vitamin C 250 mg / kg (KBC), 4. Beluntas leaf meal (0.5%) + commercial diet + vitamin E 400 IU/kg (KBE). This experiment was designed in Completely Randomized Design. The result showed that response of Alabio and Cihateup duck to feed treatment in saturated fatty acid content and unsaturated fatty acids in meat and skin of the same, namely the feed treatment of KBE high and low of KBC. Beluntas leaf meal as much as 0.5% + vitamin E in the feed could be reduced the intensity of off-odor and maintain good performance of duck. Key Words: Alabio Duck, Cihateup Duck, Beluntas Leaf Mael, Vitamint C, Vitamint E
Molasses protected palm kernel cake as source of protein for young male Ettawah Grade goats ., Supriyati; Haryanto, B
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 16, No 1 (2011)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i1.630

Abstract

Palm kernel cake has a relatively high protein content, however its degradability in the rumen is high resulting in loosing its function as protein source for ruminant. This experiment was aimed toinvestigate the effect of feeding molasses protected palm kernel cake (BIS-M) on growth of young male Ettawah Grade (Peranakan Etawah = PE) goat. Twenty four (24) PE goats were divided into 4 groups and allocated to respective feeding BIS-M treatments. The treatments were R0 = control (without BIS-M), R1 = 15% BIS-M, R2 = 30% BIS-M and R3 = 45% BIS-M. The concentrate was fed at 400 gh-1d-1 for each individual in all treatment groups, while napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum) was offered ad libitum. The live weight of the goats were between 17-18 kg at the beginning of experiment. Feeding trial was carried out for 14 weeks consisting of 2 weeks for preliminary and 12 weeks for growth performance period. The digestibility study of the nutrient was carried out during the last 7 days of  the experiment. The experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design with 6 replications. Drinking water was available at any time. Feed intake was recorded daily while the body weight was recorded every 2 weeks. The parameters of observation were feed intake, live weight gain, nutrient digestibility and feed conversion ratio. The results indicated that the dietary treatments affected the intake and digestibility of nutrients, average daily gain and feed conversion ratio (P < 0.05). The total feed dry matter intakes were 599,30; 620,74; 690,19 and 740,04 gh-1d-1 with DM and Protein digestibility of 64.74 and 75.99; 67.47 and 73.05; 70.06 and 73.02; and 72.88 and 72.25% respectively for R0, R1, R2 and R3. The ADG were 42.06; 52.78; 61.90 and 70.24 g; with feed conversion ratio of 14.68; 10.51; 9.08; and 9.85 for R0, R1, R2 and R3. It was concluded that BIS-M can be used as source of protein with optimal utilization level at 30% of the concentrate. Key Words: Palm Kernel Cake, Molasses, Ettawah Grade goats, Performance
Effects of inclusion levels of Indigofera sp. on feed intake, digestibility and body weight gain in kids fed Brachiaria ruziziensis. Tarigan, Andi; Ginting, S. P.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 16, No 1 (2011)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i1.631

Abstract

Twenty weaned male goats (F1 of Boer x Kacang) with initial weight of 9 to 12 kg and ages ranging between 3.0 and 4.0 months were used in a study to evaluate the increasing inclusion of Indigofera sp foliage as a source of protein in diets based on chopped Brachiaria ruziziensis for growing goats. Five goats were allocated to one of four treatments in a randomised block design. The diet treatments were: T0 (control diets): B. ruziziensis (100%), T1 (85% B. ruziziensis + 15% Indigofera sp.), T2 (70% B. ruziziensis + 30% Indigofera sp.) T3 (55% B. ruziziensis + 45% Indigofera sp.) all on DM basis. Feed (DM) was offered  daily at 3.5% BW. The content of CP in Indigofera sp is relatively high (258 g/kg DM), while the NDF (350.7 g/kg DM) and ADF (232.2 g/ kg DM) concentrations were low. The content of secondary compounds such as total phenol (8.9 g/kg DM), total tannin (0.8 g/kg DM) and condensed tannin (0,5 g/kg DM) were considerably low. The inclusion of Indigofera sp foliage in diets increased (P < 0.05) the DM, OM, CP, NDF and ADF digestibilities. The digestibility of DM (601,0 g/kg DM), OM (625 g/kg DM) and CP (699.0 g/kg DM) were highest in the T3 diets. DM intakes were greatest in the T2 and T3 diets (P < 0.05). Total gain increased 39, 78 and 85% in T1, T2 and T3 respectively, compared to that in the control diet. Daily gains were highest in the T3 (52.4 g) and T2 (50.5 g) diets, but feed efficiency was highest (P < 0.05) in the T3 diets (0,12). Feed efficiency were not different (P > 0.05) among the T0,T1 and T2 diets and ranged from 0.08 to 0.09. It is concluded that the foliage of Indigofera sp could be used as feed supplement to supply proteins with low tannin contents. In a grass-based diets Indigofera sp colud be used at the level of 30 to 45% (DM) for growing kids. Key Words: Indigofera, Inclusion Level, Feed Intake, Digestibility, ADG, Goats
Substitution of commercial concentrate with soy bean meal protected by tannin from banana stem juice for lambs Yulistiani, Dwi; Mathius, I-W.; Puastuti, W.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 16, No 1 (2011)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i1.632

Abstract

Study was conducted to evaluate the optimal utilization of protected soy bean meal with secondary compound from banana stem juice in ration for sheep and its effect on sheep performance. Soy bean meal was mixed with banana stem juice at ratio 1:1 (w/v) then dried in the oven at temperature 90oC. This protected soy bean meal was used to substitute commercial concentrate in sheep ration. The experiment used 24 head male lamb Sumatera composite breed. The lambs were grouped into six group based on its body weight and was assigned to one of 4 diets treatment. The sheep was fed on grass basal diet and supplemented with commercial concentrate. Data recorded were feed consumption, nutrient digestibility, average daily gain, feed efficiency and nitrogen utilization. Study was conducted in randomized complete block design and data obtained were analyzed using general linier model from SAS program.  Results show that dry matter intake (DMI) significantly (P < 0.05) increased with concentrate substitution by protected soy bean meal, however, there was no significant different (P > 0.05) between R10, R20 and R30. The increasing in DMI is followed by the increasing crude protein (CP) from 8.75 (R0) to 10.64; 11.68 and 12.32 g/BB0.75 respectively for R10; R20 and R30. Commercial concentrate substitution by protected soy bean meal significantly increased DM and CP digestibility at all levels. However, this substitution did not significantly affected organic matter (OM), neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and acid detergent fiber (ADF) digestibility. Nitrogen excretion in urine was only increased at this level 30% substitution but nitrogen retention increased at substitution levels 20 and 30%. From this study can be concluded that commercial concentrate substitution with protected soy bean meal in the diet only increased CP consumption and CP digestibility but not average daily gain of lamb. Key Words: Soy Bean Meal, Tannin, Protein, Banana Stem Juice
Molecular characterization of six sub population Indonesian local goats based on mitochondrial DNA D-loop Batubara, Aron; Noor, R.R.; Farajallah, A.; Tiesnamurti, B.; Doloksaribu, M.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 16, No 1 (2011)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i1.634

Abstract

Indonesian local goats were spread in some region, but there was still limited data’s known about the characteristics of its genetic diversity and origin. The Mitochondrial DNA D-loop sequences were used to study the genetic diversity and relationships of six sub population Indonesian local goats, namely, Kacang, Marica, Samosir, Jawarandu, Muara and Bengali goats. From 539 blood samples and DNA extraction collections were selected about 60 samples (10 samples each sub populations) analyzed by PCR-RFLP methods, followed sequence analyzed about 5 PCR products each sub population. The results of the sequence analyses were edited and acquired about 957 bp of nucleotides length. After the alignment analyses were found 50 polymorphic sites which divided into 19 haplotype groups of mtDNA D-loop region. The value of nucleotide diversity was 0.014 ± 0.002. Analysis of Neighbour Joining with Kimura 2 Parameter methods and bootstrap test with 1000 replication indicated that each sub population groups was significantly different between one groups to the others. The maternal lineages origin of six breeds of Indonesian local goats was included to the group of lineage B. The Lineage B was the maternal origin of the haplogroup of goats in the region of East Asia, South Asia, China, Mongolia, North and South Africa, Malaysia, Indonesia, Pakistan and India. Key words: Genetic Diversity, mtDNA D-loop, Haplotypes, Local Goats
Moleculer analysis of genotype kappa casein and composition of goat milk Etawah grade, Saanen and their crossbred Zurriyati, Yayu; Noor, R.R.; Maheswari, R.R.A.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 16, No 1 (2011)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i1.635

Abstract

Polymorphism of goat casein gene closely linked to the quality of milk protein. κ-casein is one of the casein fractions that influence the shape and stability of grain milk. This study is aimed to identify the variation of genotype κ-casein and related with milk quality from Etawah grade, Saanen and their crossbreed (PE-SA). The number of dairy goats used in this study was 150 animals consisted of Etawah grade (48 animals), Saanen (51 animals) and PE-SA (51 animals). Steps of experiment were: blood and milk sampling collection, DNA amplification by PCR and the product digestion using Pst1 enzyme, κ-casein gene sequencing and analyzing the quality of fresh milk. The results showed that κ-casein gene is monomorphic by PCR-RFLP (Pst1) for all the goat breeds, but DNA sequencing indicated 38 point of mutation.  Observation on goat milk quality showed that Etawah grade milk had highest (P < 0.05) density value (1.033 ± 0.002) and solid non fat (9.577 ± 0.704%) than those of Saanen and PE-SA fresh milk goat. Key Words: Dairy Goats, Κ-Casein Gene, PCR-RFLP, Milk
Genetic variation on internal protein matric (M1) and non structural protein (NS1) of Indonesian avian influenza virus H5N1 subtype Indi Dharmayanti, N.L.P.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 16, No 1 (2011)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i1.636

Abstract

The mutation and genetic variation of avian influenza virus ussually associated with Hemmaglutinin (HA) and Neuraminidase (NA). The HA and NA protein are surface glycoproteins which have role for receptor binding site of the virus, determine virus subtype and genetic variation occured in those proteins. On the other site, the virus have the internal protein that posses  function for virus replication. This study analyzed the mutation on the the internal protein virus especially the Matrix (M1) and non structural (NS1) protein and its three dimensioanal structure of proteins. The methods used in this study were virus propagation, (Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction) RT-PCR sequencing of M1 and NS1 and using DS Modeller dan  DS Standalone from Discovery Studio for Modeling and Simulation to predict the three dimentional structure of the proteins. The result of this study showed that Indonesian AI H5N1 subtype had genetic variation internal protein and have no change on conserved of condition such as putative zinc finger and nuclear localization signal (NLS). Genetic variation that occured on PDZ motif of NS1 especially have human origin motif that might be correlated with virus adaptation on human. Key Words: Avian Influenza, Matrix (M1), Non Structural (NS1), Genetic Variation
Genetic variation on internal protein matric (M1) and non structural protein (NS1) of Indonesian avian influenza virus H5N1 subtype Indi Dharmayanti, N.L.P.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 1 (2011): MARCH 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (202.568 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i1.636

Abstract

The mutation and genetic variation of avian influenza virus ussually associated with Hemmaglutinin (HA) and Neuraminidase (NA). The HA and NA protein are surface glycoproteins which have role for receptor binding site of the virus, determine virus subtype and genetic variation occured in those proteins. On the other site, the virus have the internal protein that posses  function for virus replication. This study analyzed the mutation on the the internal protein virus especially the Matrix (M1) and non structural (NS1) protein and its three dimensioanal structure of proteins. The methods used in this study were virus propagation, (Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction) RT-PCR sequencing of M1 and NS1 and using DS Modeller dan  DS Standalone from Discovery Studio for Modeling and Simulation to predict the three dimentional structure of the proteins. The result of this study showed that Indonesian AI H5N1 subtype had genetic variation internal protein and have no change on conserved of condition such as putative zinc finger and nuclear localization signal (NLS). Genetic variation that occured on PDZ motif of NS1 especially have human origin motif that might be correlated with virus adaptation on human. Key Words: Avian Influenza, Matrix (M1), Non Structural (NS1), Genetic Variation

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