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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 14 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 15, No 4 (2010)" : 14 Documents clear
Cacao pod based ration supplemented with organic Zn: Growth responce on sheeps Puastuti, Wisri; Yulistiani, Dwi; Mathius, I Wayan; Giyai, Fransiscus; Dihansih, Elis
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 15, No 4 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i4.666

Abstract

Cacao pod can be used as feed to replace grass. The aims of study was to evaluate the growth response of sheep fed on cacao pod based rations to replace grass and supplemented with organic Zn. Fresh cacao pod was chopped to the size of 1-2 cm. In untreated cacao pod (without ammoniation), chopped cacao pod was dried then milled, while in ammoniated cacao pod, the chopped cacao pod was mixed with urea, 1.5% (w/w) and kept in anaerobic conditions for 7 days. After 7 days it was dried and milled. Both, without ammoniated and ammoniated cacao pod were used for ration formulation. The rations were formulated in iso protein and iso energy (16% CP and 70% TDN). The study used 25 male lambs Sumatera Composite breed at age 7-8 months old with average body weight 18.8 ± 2.86 kg. Experiments were conducted using a randomized block design with number of animal in each group was 5. Five treatment rations evaluated were: R = grass + concentrate (positive control); K = cacao pod + concentrate; KZ = cacao pod + concentrate + organic Zn; KU = cacao pod ammoniated + concentrate; KUZ = cacao pod ammoniated + concentrate + organic Zn. The treatment rations were offered for 10 weeks. The results showed that the consumption of cacao pod based rations was higher (P < 0.05) than the grass-basal ration (75.19 g/kg BW0,75 vs 70.22 g/kg BW0,75). Suplementation of Zn organic to ammoniated or untreated cacao pod resulted in no significant difference in DM, and CP intake. DM, OM, CP digestibility and N retention were relatively similar among the fifth rations from 53.13 to 63.91%, from 54.69 to 66.49%, from 66.0 to 79.28% and from 9.5 to 13.4 g/h respectively. R ration had similar NH3 levels with KU ration (21.57 mM vs 22.94 mM) but higher than the K, KZ and KUZ ration (16.45 mM, 16.62 mM and 13.61 mM). VFA concentration showed no difference among treatments (from 140.32 to 179.76 mM). Sheep fed ration R had similar ADG with K and KZ (92.19 g/h vs 83.13 g/h; 93.44 g/h) but higher than the ration KU and KZ (73.44 g/h and 61.72 g/h). From this study can be concluded that grass-based rations can be replaced by the cacao pod based rations supplemented with organic Zn and resulted in relatively similar ADG of 92.19 g/h vs 93.44 g/h. Key Words: Cacao Pod, Ammoniation, Organic Zn, Sheep
Utilization of oligosaccharides component from soybean meal and sweet potatoes on broiler feed Haryati, Tuti; ., Supriyati
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 15, No 4 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i4.664

Abstract

The investigation was carried out to study the effect of oligosaccharides from soybean meal (SBM) and sweet potatoes as feed additives on feed to improve the productivity of broiler. The amounts of 704 day-old chicks from Arbor Arcres were randomly distributed into 16 treatments with 4 repetions  and with 11 chicks in each pens. The treatments  were: 2 level of sweet potato oligosaccharides (0.1 and 0.2%), 2 levels of residue of  sweet potato extracts (0.4 and 0.8%), 2 levels of SBM oligosaccharides (0.1 and 0.2%), 2 levels of residue of SMB extracts, 2 levels of MOS commercial (0.01 and 0.02%) 2 levels of commercial inulin (0.1 and 0.5%), 2 levels of commercial FOS (0.2 and 0.4%) and control with and without antibiotic. The results showed that better FCR (P < 0.05) was seen on the addition of 0.2% sweet potato oligosaccharides at 3 weeks trial, meanwhile on 0.1% addition was able to improved the absorption of Ca and P. The trial up to 5 weeks, only treatment with 0.8% of residue have a better FCR value (P < 0.05). The effect of utilization of SMB oligosaccharides was only observed on 0.8% residue at 5 weeks trial which have a better FCR value. It could be concluded that the extract of oligosaccharides from soybean meal and sweet potatoes could improve the effisiency of broiler feed. Key Words: Oligosaccharides, Sweet Potato, Soy-Bean Meal, Productivity, Broiler
The Utilization of Indigofera sp as the sole foliage in goat diets supplemented with high carbohydrate or high protein concentrates Ginting, Simon P; Krisnan, Rantan; Sirait, Juniar; ., Antonius
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 15, No 4 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i4.665

Abstract

Indigofera sp is a tree leguminous forage species known to be adaptable to the drought climate and saline soil and so it has potential as alternative feed resource to support the ruminant animal production. This study aimed to study the  responses of goats fed Indigofera sp as the sole foliages in their diets. Twenty male Boer x Kacang crossbred goats  (6 months of age;16 ± 2,1 kg BW) were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments containing fresh or wilted leaves of Indigifera sp. as the sole foliages and supplemented with high carbohydrate (HCC) or protein (HPC)concentrates. Consumable parts i.e. leaves and twigs of about 8 to 10 months of age of Indigofera sp. were harvested by hand plucking every day in the morning. The experiment was a 2 x 2 factorial design arranged in a completely randomized design. The ruminal pH ranged from 6.14-6.85 and were  not affected (P > 0.05) by wilting nor by the type of concentrates. Wilting did not affect (P > 0.05) the concentration of  ruminal NH3-N, but  it was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in HPC group (32.36-32.54 mg dL-1) than those in HCC group(17.94-23.57 mg dL-1). Total VFA concentration were not affected by wilting  nor by the type of concentrates  (P > 0.05). Goats in the HCC group,however,numerically have higher total VFA concentration (178.5-183.75 mmol L-1) than those in the HPC group (142.21-174.64 mmol L-1). The apparent digestibility coeficients  of DM, OM, CP and energy of the diet were not different (P > 0.05) when contained wilted or fresh Indigofera foliage.  Significant increases (P < 0.05)   in the DM and  OM, but not in the CP and energy  apparent digestibility coeficients were observed in the HPC goats. Dry matter intakes were not different (P > 0.05) among dietary treatments, but the ADG of goats in the HCC group (60-63 g d-1) were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those  of goats in the HPC treatment (80-87 g d-1). Blood glucosa concentration was not affected by wilting nor by type of concentrates (P > 0.05).  BUN was not affected by wilting process, but providing high protein concentrates significantly (P < 0.05) increased the BUN concentration. It is concluded that foliage of Indigofera sp could be used as the sole forage in intensive production of goats. Wilting the foliage prior to feeding seemed to be unnecessary, since this process does not improve the animal productivity in term of daily gain and efficiency of feed utilization. Key Words: Indigofera sp, Supplements,  Ruminal Fermentation, Goats
Effects of concentration of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) on the rates of ovulations and twinning birth Situmorang, Polmer; Sianturi, R; Kusumaningrum, D. A; Triwulaningsih, E
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 15, No 4 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i4.667

Abstract

Twinning in monotocous domestic species dairy cattle is most frequently by dyzygote in which two eggs is ovulated by treatment with gonadotropin hormon. A study to see the effects of concentration of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (Folltropin) on the ovulation rates and twinning birth was conducted. The experiment designed was commpletely randomized designed with 3 treatment of total concentration of FSH (A: 12, B: 6 and C 3 ml) and 4 lactating cows for a replications. Hormon was intramussculary injected in decreasing dossis method twice a day with 12 hours apart for 4 days. Data recorded were the diameter of ovary (DO), total corpus luteum (TCL), concentration of progesterone on the day 12 of estrus cycle (P), percentage of pregnancy and number of birth. FSH significantly increased the ovulation rates. The means DO was significantly (P < 0.05) higher after injection (6.3 cm) than those before injection (2.0 cm). The TCL and P were highly significant (P < 0.01) higher after injection. The TCL and P were 1.2 and 0.8 ng/ml and 8.5 and 3.0 ng/ml before and after hormone treatment respectively. Concentration of FSH significantly increase (P < 0.05) the TCL and P but not for DO. The means DO, TCL and P were 5.0, 4.5 and 1.6, 5.5, 8,8 and 1.8 and 8.4cm, 12.3 and 5.3 ng/ml for treatments C, B and A respectively. Persentage of pregnancy was decreasing by the increasing of ovulations rates and the highest percentage of pregnancy 75% was obtained on treatments C. The normal single birth was found for treatment C and neonatal death were occurred for treatment B and A where the number of calves is higher than 2. In conclusion the FSH increased the ovulation rates in dairy cattle and the ovulation rates obtained was also affected by the concentration of hormone. Key Words: Hormone, FSH, Ovulation, Twin Birth
Aplication of growth hormone genes familly (GH, GHR, GHRH and Pit-1) for detecting genetic variation of buffaloes in Pandeglang and Lebak districts in Banten Province Sumantri, Cece; Diyono, R; Farajallah, A; Anggraeni, A; Andreas, E
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 15, No 4 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i4.668

Abstract

Selection using genetic markers are commonly performed to improve livestock productivity in the livestock industry. The objectives of this study were to identify growth hormone genes family (GH|MspI, GH|AluI, GHR|AluI, GHRH|HaeIII and Pit-1|HinfI) polymorphisms of Banten buffalo population consisted of Pandeglang and Lebak subpopulations. A total number of 209 blood samples were collected from 15 districts. Genomic DNAs were extracted by a standard phenol-chloroform protocol and amplified by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques, then PCR products of GH, GHR, GHRH and Pit-1 Genes were digested with MspI, AluI, HaeIII and HinfI enzyme restriction. Fragments of GH|MspI, GH|AluI, GHR|AluI, GHRH|HaeIII and Pit-1|HinfI were detected by EtBr method. The results showed that GH|MspI and GHRH|HaeIII loci were polymorphic, GH|AluI, GHR|AluI and Pit-1|HinfI, loci were monomorphic. GH allele (-) at locus GH|MspI was only found in Cisata (0.03) and Menes (0.11). Allele B at locus GHRH|HaeIII only found in Cibadak (0.42), Cisata (0.30) and Menes (0.11). In the total population of Banten locus GH|MspI have low diversity (He = 0.02) and polymorphic information content (Pic = 0.02), whereas GHRH|HaeIII locus has a higher diversity (He = 0.23) and Pic (0.22). Key Words: Polymorphism, Growth Hormone Genes, Buffalo
In vitro study of larvacidal effect of Chrysomya bezziana between atsiri oil (Piper betle leaf) from Sri Lanka and Bogor Wardhana, April H; Muharsini, S; Santosa, S; Arambewela, L.S.R; Kumarasinghe, S.P.W
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 15, No 4 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i4.669

Abstract

Treatment of myiasis caused by the larvae of Chrysomya bezziana resulted variation results. The aim of the experiment are to compare larvacidal effect of atsiri oil of Piper betle leaf originated from Sri Lanka and Bogor agains Chrysomya bezziana larvae and to identify atsiri oil using Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC).  Silica gel plate GF254 with toluena and ethyl ecetate as diluents was used in TLC. L1 and L2 of Chrysomya bezziana larvae were used for in vitro assay using agar plate contained atsiri oil of three concentrations ie. 2, 3 and 4%. Asuntol 1% and aquadest sterile were used as positive and negative control, respectively. Ten larvae were used in five replicates. The larvae were observed every 30 minutes for four hours. Larval mortality were counted and probit analysed using POLO-PC software, therefore the lethal concentration (LC50 and LC95) and lethal time (LT50 and LT95) were defined. The results showed there was a difference on migration distance between atsiri oil from Sri Lanka and Bogor on nRf 79-88 analysed using TLC. In vitro assay showed that both lethal concentration and lethal time of atsiri oil from Sri Lanka was higher than from Bogor. This results indicated that larvacidal effect of atsiri oil from Bogor was stronger than atsiri oil from Sri Lanka in in vitro both on L1 and L2. Key Words: Piper Bitle Leaf, Atsiri Oil, Chrysomya bezziana, Sri Lanka, Bogor
Purification and production of monospecific antibody to the hemagglutinin from Subtype H5N1 influenza virus Tarigan, Simson; Indriani, R; Hewajuli, D
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 15, No 4 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i4.670

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to purify the hemagglutinin from H5N1 virus and to generate monospecific antibody appropriate for production of sensitive and specific immunoassay for H5N1 avian influenza. For this purpose, a local isolate H5N1 virus (A/Ck/West Java/Hamd/2006) was propagated in chicken embryos. The viral pellet was dissolved in a Triton-X-100 solution, undissolved viral particles were pelleted by ultracentrifuge, and the supernatant containing viral surface glycoproteins (Hemagglutinin and neuraminidase) was collected. The neuraminidase in the supernatant was absorbed by passing the supernatant through an Oxamic-acid-superose column. After dialyzing extensively, the filtrate was further fractionated with an anion exchange chromatography (Q-sepharose) column. Proteins adsorbed by the column were eluted stepwisely with 0.10, 0.25, 0.25 and 0.75 M NaCl in 20 mM Tris, ph 8. Hemagglutinin (H5) was found to be eluted from the column with the 0.5 M NaCl elution buffer. The purified H5 was free from other viral proteins based on immunoassays using commercial antibodies to H5N1 nucleoprotein and neuraminidase. When used as ELISA’s coating antigen, the purified H5 proved to be sensitive and specific for hemagglutinin H5. Cross reactions with other type-A-influenza virus, H6, H7 dan H9, were negligibly low. For the production of monospecific antiserum, the purified H5 was separated with SDS-PAGE, the band containing the H5 monomer was cut out , homogenised and injected into rabbits. The antiserum was capable of detecting the presence of inactivated H5N1 virus in a very dilute suspension, with a detection limit of 0.04 heagglutination (HA) unit. The purified hemagglutinin and the serum raised against it should be useful for developing specific, sensitive and affordable immunoassay for H5N1 avian influenza. Key Words: H5N1, Hemagglutinin, Triton, Oxamic-acid Sepharose, Q sepharose, ELISA
Cacao pod based ration supplemented with organic Zn: Growth responce on sheeps Puastuti, Wisri; Yulistiani, Dwi; Mathius, I Wayan; Giyai, Fransiscus; Dihansih, Elis
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 4 (2010): DECEMBER 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (78.482 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i4.666

Abstract

Cacao pod can be used as feed to replace grass. The aims of study was to evaluate the growth response of sheep fed on cacao pod based rations to replace grass and supplemented with organic Zn. Fresh cacao pod was chopped to the size of 1-2 cm. In untreated cacao pod (without ammoniation), chopped cacao pod was dried then milled, while in ammoniated cacao pod, the chopped cacao pod was mixed with urea, 1.5% (w/w) and kept in anaerobic conditions for 7 days. After 7 days it was dried and milled. Both, without ammoniated and ammoniated cacao pod were used for ration formulation. The rations were formulated in iso protein and iso energy (16% CP and 70% TDN). The study used 25 male lambs Sumatera Composite breed at age 7-8 months old with average body weight 18.8 ± 2.86 kg. Experiments were conducted using a randomized block design with number of animal in each group was 5. Five treatment rations evaluated were: R = grass + concentrate (positive control); K = cacao pod + concentrate; KZ = cacao pod + concentrate + organic Zn; KU = cacao pod ammoniated + concentrate; KUZ = cacao pod ammoniated + concentrate + organic Zn. The treatment rations were offered for 10 weeks. The results showed that the consumption of cacao pod based rations was higher (P < 0.05) than the grass-basal ration (75.19 g/kg BW0,75 vs 70.22 g/kg BW0,75). Suplementation of Zn organic to ammoniated or untreated cacao pod resulted in no significant difference in DM, and CP intake. DM, OM, CP digestibility and N retention were relatively similar among the fifth rations from 53.13 to 63.91%, from 54.69 to 66.49%, from 66.0 to 79.28% and from 9.5 to 13.4 g/h respectively. R ration had similar NH3 levels with KU ration (21.57 mM vs 22.94 mM) but higher than the K, KZ and KUZ ration (16.45 mM, 16.62 mM and 13.61 mM). VFA concentration showed no difference among treatments (from 140.32 to 179.76 mM). Sheep fed ration R had similar ADG with K and KZ (92.19 g/h vs 83.13 g/h; 93.44 g/h) but higher than the ration KU and KZ (73.44 g/h and 61.72 g/h). From this study can be concluded that grass-based rations can be replaced by the cacao pod based rations supplemented with organic Zn and resulted in relatively similar ADG of 92.19 g/h vs 93.44 g/h. Key Words: Cacao Pod, Ammoniation, Organic Zn, Sheep
Effects of concentration of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH) on the rates of ovulations and twinning birth Situmorang, Polmer; Sianturi, R; Kusumaningrum, D. A; Triwulaningsih, E
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 4 (2010): DECEMBER 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (135.51 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i4.667

Abstract

Twinning in monotocous domestic species dairy cattle is most frequently by dyzygote in which two eggs is ovulated by treatment with gonadotropin hormon. A study to see the effects of concentration of Follicle Stimulating Hormone (Folltropin) on the ovulation rates and twinning birth was conducted. The experiment designed was commpletely randomized designed with 3 treatment of total concentration of FSH (A: 12, B: 6 and C 3 ml) and 4 lactating cows for a replications. Hormon was intramussculary injected in decreasing dossis method twice a day with 12 hours apart for 4 days. Data recorded were the diameter of ovary (DO), total corpus luteum (TCL), concentration of progesterone on the day 12 of estrus cycle (P), percentage of pregnancy and number of birth. FSH significantly increased the ovulation rates. The means DO was significantly (P < 0.05) higher after injection (6.3 cm) than those before injection (2.0 cm). The TCL and P were highly significant (P < 0.01) higher after injection. The TCL and P were 1.2 and 0.8 ng/ml and 8.5 and 3.0 ng/ml before and after hormone treatment respectively. Concentration of FSH significantly increase (P < 0.05) the TCL and P but not for DO. The means DO, TCL and P were 5.0, 4.5 and 1.6, 5.5, 8,8 and 1.8 and 8.4cm, 12.3 and 5.3 ng/ml for treatments C, B and A respectively. Persentage of pregnancy was decreasing by the increasing of ovulations rates and the highest percentage of pregnancy 75% was obtained on treatments C. The normal single birth was found for treatment C and neonatal death were occurred for treatment B and A where the number of calves is higher than 2. In conclusion the FSH increased the ovulation rates in dairy cattle and the ovulation rates obtained was also affected by the concentration of hormone. Key Words: Hormone, FSH, Ovulation, Twin Birth
Aplication of growth hormone genes familly (GH, GHR, GHRH and Pit-1) for detecting genetic variation of buffaloes in Pandeglang and Lebak districts in Banten Province Sumantri, Cece; Diyono, R; Farajallah, A; Anggraeni, A; Andreas, E
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 4 (2010): DECEMBER 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (2820.571 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i4.668

Abstract

Selection using genetic markers are commonly performed to improve livestock productivity in the livestock industry. The objectives of this study were to identify growth hormone genes family (GH|MspI, GH|AluI, GHR|AluI, GHRH|HaeIII and Pit-1|HinfI) polymorphisms of Banten buffalo population consisted of Pandeglang and Lebak subpopulations. A total number of 209 blood samples were collected from 15 districts. Genomic DNAs were extracted by a standard phenol-chloroform protocol and amplified by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques, then PCR products of GH, GHR, GHRH and Pit-1 Genes were digested with MspI, AluI, HaeIII and HinfI enzyme restriction. Fragments of GH|MspI, GH|AluI, GHR|AluI, GHRH|HaeIII and Pit-1|HinfI were detected by EtBr method. The results showed that GH|MspI and GHRH|HaeIII loci were polymorphic, GH|AluI, GHR|AluI and Pit-1|HinfI, loci were monomorphic. GH allele (-) at locus GH|MspI was only found in Cisata (0.03) and Menes (0.11). Allele B at locus GHRH|HaeIII only found in Cibadak (0.42), Cisata (0.30) and Menes (0.11). In the total population of Banten locus GH|MspI have low diversity (He = 0.02) and polymorphic information content (Pic = 0.02), whereas GHRH|HaeIII locus has a higher diversity (He = 0.23) and Pic (0.22). Key Words: Polymorphism, Growth Hormone Genes, Buffalo

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