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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Search results for , issue " Vol 15, No 3 (2010): SEPTEMBER 2010" : 10 Documents clear
nutritional composition and in vitro digestibility of indigofera sp at different interval and intensity of defoliations Tarigan, Andi; Abdullah, L; Ginting, S.P; Permana, I.G
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 3 (2010): SEPTEMBER 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (206.435 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i3.657

Abstract

One of the main constraints in increasing livestock productivity in the tropical region is the scarcity of good quality feed throught the year, particularly during the long-dry season. Being a leguminous tree, Indigofera sp known to be tolerant to dry climate and salinity, should be considered as alternative fodder for ruminant animals. This study is aimed to investigate the productivity and some nutritional quality of Indigofera sp under different interval and hight of defoliation. The experiment was designed in a randomized block of factorial treatments. The factors were interval of defoliation (30, 60 and 90 days) and hight of defoliation (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 m above ground level). Indigofera sp was planted in 4 x 3 m plots of 36 plots (4 replications) and were harvested at 8 months old. The DM production, chemical composition and in vitro digestibility were measured according to the treatments. The highest DM productivity was (33.25 t ha-1 y-1) at defoliation interval of 90 days and defoliation hight of 1.5 m, and was not different (P > 0.05) from the treatment combination of 60 days defoliation interval and 1,5 m defoliation hight (31.23 t ha-1 y-1). The highest leaf/stem ratio was 2.6 (P < 0.05) in the 30 day defoliation interval across the defoliation hight. The OM content of Indigofera sp was not affected by defoliation treatments and ranging from 884.6 to 906.8 g/kg. The highest NDF and ADF contents were (P < 0.05) in the 90-d defoliation interval and 1.0 m (387.9 and 272.6 g/kg, respectively) and were not different (P > 0.05) for the 90-d defoliation interval and 1.5 m defoliation hight (385.6 and 267.0 g/kg, respectively). The crude protein content was lowest (P < 0.05) in the 30-d defoliation interval across the defoliation hight ranging from 211.2 to 219.7 g/kg, and it was not different between the 60 and 90-d defoliation interval across the defoliation hight (255.0-258.1 g/kg and 230.3-236.0 g/kg, respectively). Defoliation hight did not affect (P > 0.05) the DM and OM in vitro digestibility. They were at the 90-d defoliation interval ranging from 680.2 to 706.8 g/kg and from 668.6 to 686.8 g/kg, respectively across the defoliation hight different. The DM and OM digestibility were not different (P > 0.05) between the 30 and 60-day defoliation intervals. It is concluded that when planted at low land of wet climate the combination of a 60-d defoliation interval and 1.5 m defoliation hight is an optimum cutting management in utilization of Indigofera sp as foliage for ruminant. Key Words: Defoliation, Nutritive Quality, Productivity, Indigofera sp
Genetic characteristic of protein membran of avian influenza viruses H5N1 subtype Dharmayanti, N.L.P Indi; Hewajuli, D.A; Ratnawati, A; Indriani, R; ., Darminto
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 3 (2010): SEPTEMBER 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (195.271 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i3.662

Abstract

In 2006-2008 there were findings about the antigenic drift on AI virus due to vaccination and the AI H5N1 subtype viruses which was similar to H5N1 viruses in human. The findings indicated that the AI viruses continue and undergoing to mutate and try to adapt with their environment.  The objective of this study was to characterize the mutation of recent AI viruses (2009) on the membran protein namely Hemagglutinin (HA), Neuraminidase (NA) and Matrix 2 (M2). In this study RT-PCR – sequencing methods and genetic analysis for the protein membran of AI viruses were used. Result revealed that there were specific mutation belong to AI 2009 viruses on HA and NA protein such as AI virus mutation in 2008 which was isolated from backyard chicken. The mutations were non synonimous and not caused by immunological pressure. Furthermore, M2 analysis indicated that the viruses were resistant to amantadine. Key Words: Mutation, AI Subtype H5N1 Viruses, Membran Protein
Effect of urea or coconut cake supplementation on nutrient intake and digestion of Bali cows maintained on tropical grass hay Jelantik, I.G.N; Belli, H.L.L
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 3 (2010): SEPTEMBER 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (72.763 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i3.658

Abstract

Three rumen cannulated Bali cows were fed basal diet consisting of about 2 kg DM of medium quality grass hay (CP = 7.47%) together with ad libitum amount of low quality grass hay (CP = 3.5%) (HH). In the supplemented rations, this basal ration was supplemented with isonitrogenous amount of urea (HU) or coconut cake (HC). The experimental was on design 3 x 3 latin square aiming to study effects of different source of nitrogen supplementation on the intake of poor quality hay (PQH), total diet, nutrients supply and nitrogen utilisation by the animals. Changes in rumen environment and dry matter and protein degradation after supplementation were also investigated. Neither urea or coconut cake (CC) supplementation increased hay intake but the total dry matter intake was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in HC than in HH and HU. Digestibility of EE, CHO and GE but not NDF were also improved with CC supplementation. In contrast, CC supplementation tended to depress CF apparent digestibility. Rumen pH was significantly elevated (P < 0.05) with urea but it was reduced (P < 0.05) with CC supplementation. Both supplements increased rumen ammonia concentration, while total as well as individual VFAs remained unaffected. Dry matter and NDF rumen degradability tended to increase with urea but not with CC supplementation. Supplementation with coconut cake markedly improved protein balance while it was unimproved with urea supplementation. Key Words: Bali Cows, Urea, Coconut Cake, Digestion
Characterisation of the H5 and N1 genes of an Indonesian highly pathogenic Avian Influenza virus isolate by sequencing of multiple clone approach Hartawan, Risza; Robinson, Karl; Mahony, Timothy; Meers, Joanne
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 3 (2010): SEPTEMBER 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1893.685 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i3.663

Abstract

Hemagglutinin and neuraminidase are the main antigenic determinants of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus. The features of these surface glycoproteins have been intensively studied at the molecular level. The objective of this research was to characterise the genes encoding these glycoproteins by sequencing of multiple clones. The H5 and N1 genes of isolate A/duck/Tangerang/Bbalitvet-ACIAR-TE11/2007 were each amplified in one or two fragments using reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR), and subsequently cloned into pGEM-T Easy TA cloning system. The sequencing result demonstrated high homology between respective clones but with several variations that were identified as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A total of 1,707 base pair and 1,350 base pair of H5 and N1 genes respectively were successfully assembled from multiple clones containing the genes of interest. The features of both H5 and N1 genes from this isolate resemble the typical characteristics of Indonesian strains of H5N1 virus from sub-clade 2.1.3. Key Words: Avian Influenza, Characterization, Gene Cloning, Hemagglutinin, Neuraminidase
Effect of steamed sago and golden snail flour as substitution of yellow corn on performance of male duck of Alabio, Mojosari and MA Subhan, Ahmad; Yuwanta, T; Sidadolog, J.Hp; Rohaeni, E.S
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 3 (2010): SEPTEMBER 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (71.892 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i3.654

Abstract

This study was aimed at finding out the effects of combining steaming sago (Metroxylon Spp) and golden snail flour  (Pomacea Spp) as the source of energy in duck ration, substituting yellow corn,  on the performance of  male Alabio, Mojosari, and their cross (MA). One hundred and ninety two young male ducks from the three breeds of 7 days old were assigned in 48 units of cage (4 ducks/cage). Research method applied was Completely Randomized Design with factorial pattern (3x4). The first factor was duck breeds (a) consisted of tree duck breeds: Alabio duck, Mojosari duck and Raja duck and the second factor was types of ration: R0 (control/100% basal ration), R1 (basal ration + 13% steaming sago and 2% golden snail flour), R2 (basal ration + 26% steaming sago and 4% golden snail flour) and R3 (basal ration + 39% steaming sago and 6% golden snail flour). All treatments were repeated four times. The observed variables were performance of ducks: body weight, body weight gain, ration consumption and ration conversion. Results indicated that breed had significant effect (P < 0.05) on body weight, body weight gain and ration conversion. Meanwhile, ration had significant effect (P < 0.05) on ration consumption, body weight gain, and final body weight. It is concluded that the combination of steaming sago and golden snail flour up to 45% of the ration could replace the need for yellow corn as the source of energy in the ration without affecting the performance of male ducks of 1 – 8 weeks old. Cross male ducks were better than that male Alabio ducks and Mojosari because they were more efficient in converting ration into meat which resulted in higher body weight gain. Key words: Steaming Sago, Golden Snail Flour, Male Ducks, Performance
Effect of light intencity on forages and seed production of Kalopo (Calopogonium muconoides) Fanindi, Achmad; Prawiradiputra, B.R; Abdullah, L
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 3 (2010): SEPTEMBER 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (160.794 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i3.659

Abstract

Kalopo (Calopogonium mucunoides) was used as cover crops in plantation. Besides, kalopo can be used as forage, esspecially in dry season. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of light intensity on forage and seed production. Research was conducted at Research Institute for Animal Production, Ciawi Bogor and Laboratory of Agrostology Faculty of Animal Husbandry, Bogor Agricultural University, for 16 months. Four levels of light intensity, namely: 100%, 80%,60% and 40% were applied, leguminous species of kalopo (Calopogonium mucunoides), was used. Block Randomized Design with 3 replications was applied in this research. Data collected was analyzed by ANOVA and Duncan’s Multiple Range Test. Forage production was evaluated within one year. The forage quality and digestibility (invitro) were investigated. Seed production was accumulated as seasonal seed production during one year. The results showed that light intensity affected (P < 0.05) forage and seed production, chlorophyll and total chlorophyll of kalopo, but did not affect (P > 0.05) quality and digestibility of kalopo. Seed production of kalopo was affected (P < 0.05) by light intensity, the highest forage and seed production of kalopo were obtained from treatment of full light intensity (100%). The seed quality of kalopo was affected by light intensity. The best seed quality of kalopo was achieved from 80% light intensity. The result shows that plots with light intensity of 100% was the best light intensity for forage and seed production of kalopo. Kalopo could grow well in the plots up to 80% light intensity. Key Words: Light Intensity, Forage, Seed, Kalopo
Broiler performance fed jatropha curcas seed meal detoxified by fermentation, physic and chemical treatments Wina, Elizabeth; Tangendjaja, B; Pasaribu, T; Purwadaria, T
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 3 (2010): SEPTEMBER 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (111.962 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i3.655

Abstract

Utilization of jatropha seed meal as a feed ingredient is limited by the presence of several anti nutritive and toxic compounds in the seed meal. The aim of this research is to evaluate feeding of jatropha seed meal detoxified using fermentation by two fungi and rumen microbes (as biological detoxification) and using a combination of chemical and physical treatments on broiler performance. One hundred seventy five chicks (7 days old) were used and were divided into 5 treatments in 7 replications and each replication in one cage consisted of 5 chicks. R1 was control feed (K) without jatropha seed meal., 2) R2 was feed with 4% of Jatropha seed meal fermented by Neurosphora sitophila (FNS), R3 was feed with 4% of Jatropha seed meal fermented by Aspergillus oryzae (FAS), R4 was feed with 4% of Jatropha seed meal fermented by rumen microbes and R5 with 4% of Jatropha seed meal treated by autoclaved, refluxed by hexane and soaked in methanol (OEHM). Treated feed was given for 14 days at the end of the feeding treatment, two chickens from each replication were slaughtered and organ weights were recorded.  Body weight of chicken and feed conversion ratio were calculated. The rest of the chicken was fed commercial feed for the next 7 days (recovery periode).  Chicken mortality was almost 0% but 1 chicken from FAS treatment died at the recovery period. Feed consumption was lower at fermented jatropha seed meal than control (K) or OEHM, resulted in lower body weight of chicken. The abdomen fat weight and organ weights especially pancreas or spleen resulted from treatment with jatropha were much lower than that of K. In the recovery period, body weight of chicken in the OEHM treatment was almost similar from that of control chicken. In conclusion, biological detoxification on BBJ was able to reduce chicken mortality but could not improve the daily gain higher than control treatment. The best method to detoxify jatropha seed meal was the combination of physical and chemical treatment (using autoclave, followed by hexane and methanol extractions). Key Words: Broilers, Jatropha Seed Meal, Detoxification, Fermentation
Effect of genotypes and aflatoxin levels in the diets on early laying characteristics of local ducks Prasetyo, L. Hardi; Susanti, T
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 3 (2010): SEPTEMBER 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (40.852 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i3.660

Abstract

Layer ducks are known for their sensitivity to aflatoxin contamination in their diets, and this has been causing problem in egg productivity of local ducks due to feeding system practiced by traditional farmers. This study was aimed at exploring the level of sensitivity of Mojosari and Tegal ducks to different aflatoxin levels in their diets, especially on characteristics during early laying period. Three hundreds and nine female Mojosari ducks and 260 female Tegal ducks were used in this study. Two levels of aflatoxin in the diets, 0 and 150 ppb, were given to 4 week-old ducklings for 4 weeks. Observations were taken on age at first laying, body weight at first laying, and egg qualities as early indications of the egg production potentials. The results showed that different levels of aflatoxin in the diets only affected live weight at first laying, and not age at first laying. The two genotypes differed significantly in egg weight, yolk weight, and shell weight. It is concluded that aflatoxin contamination in the diets during early growth did not really affect characteristics of early laying of Mojosari and Tegal ducks. Key Words: Local Ducks, Aflatoxin
In vitro degradability test on rice bran containing Tithonia diversifolia (HEMSL.) A. Gray and kelor (Moringa oleifera, LAMK) leaves ., Firsoni; Fortuna, Conny; Lisanti, Elsa
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 3 (2010): SEPTEMBER 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (62.389 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i3.656

Abstract

A research was done to investigate the advantages of Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.) A. Gray and Moringa oleifera Lamk  leaves as protein source in ruminant concentrate on in-vitro rumen metabolism. Randomized Block Design with 4 treatments and 5 replications was applied in this experiment. The treatments were: A = Tithonia diversifolia (TD) 75% + Rice Bran (DD) 25%: B = TD (56.25%) + Moringa oleifera (MO) 18.75% + DD 25%; C = TD 37.50%) + MO 37.50% + DD 25%; D = TD 18.75% + MO 56.25% + DD 25%. Samples were weighted 375 ± 5 mg, placed into syringe glass 100 ml, 30 ml rumen liquor with bicarbonat buffer media was added and incubated in 390C for 48 hours. Parameters measured were gas production after 0, 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours incubation, degradability of organic matter (DBK) and dry matter (DBO), NH3, total VFA concentration, and microbe biomass production (mg) after 48 hours incubation. Results showed that Moringa oleifera replaced some Tithonia diversifolia in concentrate could improve gas production, total VFA concentration, DBK and DBO significantly (P < 0.05). The highest gas production was obtained from treatment D (52.98 ml/375 mg DM) and the lowest was from treatment A (41,02 ml/375 mg DM). The highest VFA total was produced by treatment D (88.20 mM) and the lowest was from treatment A (78.86 mM). The highest DBK dan DBO were obtained from treatment D (73.74 and 73.32%) and the lowest was from treatment A (68.77 and 67.54%). Treatment D produced the highest NH3 and microbial biomass (38.09 mg/100 ml and 89.50 mg), the lowest was obtained from treatment A (35.84 mg/100 ml and 84.66 mg). Key Words: Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl.) A. Gray, Moringa oleifera Lamk, Protein, Rive Bran,  In Vitro
Morphometric performances of Katingan cattle in Central Kalimantan Utomo, Bambang Ngadji; Noor, R.R; Sumantri, C; Supriatna, I; Gunardi, E.D
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 3 (2010): SEPTEMBER 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (313.3 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i3.661

Abstract

The information of Katingan cattle as an indigenous cattle in Central Kalimantan is very limited, especially phenotypic characterization. A number of 72 heads, consist of 57 heads female and 15 heads male of Katingan cattle in adults category were used in this study. The samples were obtained from three sub districts in district of Katingan, those were Tewah Sanggalang Garing (Pendahara Village), Pulau Malan (Buntut Bali Village) and Katingan Tengah (Tumbang Lahang Village). The location were used as the variable of groups (subpopulation). This study was conducted to describe morphometric performance, which was analysed by discriminant and canonical to estimate the phylogenic relationship and to determine the discriminant variable among the group (subpopulation). The SAS package program version 6.0 and MEGA 2 program was used to analyze data. The observed parameters were body length, wither height, chest width, chest depth, chest circumference, hip heigth, hip width, head height, head length and head width. The chest depth and hip height of female cattle from group of Buntut Bali were lower (P < 0.05) than that of Pendahara and Tumbang Lahang groups. The parameter of: chest width, hip width and body length of Buntut Bali groups were higher (P < 0.05) than that of Pendahara and Tumbang Lahang groups. The average body weight of male Katingan cattle from Buntut Bali was higher (P < 0.05) than that of Pendahara and Tumbang Lahang groups but there were not different (P > 0.05) on bodyweight of female Katingan cattle among location. The highest similarity value was Katingan cattle from group of Tumbang Lahang (92,86%) followed by group of Pendahara (40.91%) and group of Buntut Bali (38.89%), repectivelly. Katingan cattle from group of Pendahara and Tumbang Lahang had closest genetic distance (1.406), while the longest genetic distance (2.046) was between group of Buntut Bali and group of Tumbang Lahang. Genetic distance between group of Buntut Bali and Pendahara was 1.929. Katingan cattle from Pendahara and Tumbang Lahang within one cluster. Body length in canonical structure 2 can be used as discriminant variable. Key Words: Katingan Cattle, Morphometric, Genetic Distance, Discriminant Analysis, Canonical

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