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Ahmadi Riyanto
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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 20 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 15, No 2 (2010)" : 20 Documents clear
quality of broiler fed diet supplemented by garlic meal and white turmeric meal Dono, Nanung Danar
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 15, No 2 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i2.645

Abstract

This research was done within 42 days to investigate the effect of diet supplemented by garlic (Allium sativum) and white turmeric (Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb) meals on physical and chemical quality of broiler meat. The number of 90 broiler DOC were used in this study.  They were randomly allocated into 18 unit of cages. During the study, the chicken were given 6 feeding treatments, i.e.: R-0 (98.0% base diet + 2.0% filler; as control diet), RB-1 (98.0% base diet + 1.0% garlic meal + 1.0% filler), RB-2 (98.0% base diet + 2.0% garlic meal), RT-1 (98.0% base diet + 1.0% white turmeric meal + 1.0% filler), RT-2 (98.0% base diet + 2.0% white turmeric meal), and RB1T1 (98.0% base diet + 1.0% garlic meal + 1.0% white turmeric meal). The base diet was composed of: yellow corn, soybean meal, fish meal, rice polishing meal, sorghum, poultry meat meal, mineral mix, and was design to contain 17.5% crude protein and metabolizable energy 2,900 kcal/kg. Variables observed were:  physical appearance (slaughter weight, non-feather weight, carcass weight), physical quality (pH, water holding capacity, cooking lose, tenderness), and cholesterol content (breast meat and blood cholesterol). All data were statistically analyzed by the Oneway of ANOVA and followed by the DMRT for significant results. Results showed that 1.0 - 2.0% garlic meal and 1.0 - 2.0% white turmeric meal supplementation reduced: breast meat cholesterol (P < 0.05), cooking lose (P < 0.05), and increased: pH (P < 0.01), and water holding capacity (P < 0.01) and improved tenderness (P < 0.05). Supplementation of 2% garlic meal and white turmeric meal didn’t affect slaughter weight, non-feather weight, carcass weight, nor blood cholesterol. Key Kords: Physical And Chemical Quality, Broiler’s Meat, Garlic, White Turmeric
The effect of fermentation of sludge with Neorospora sp on the egg performances and quality of laying hens Fenita, Yosi; Santoso, Urip; Prakoso, Hardi
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 15, No 2 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i2.646

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to produce enriched eggs (high concentration in protein, amino acid and β-karoten) but law in lipid and cholesterol content. An experiment was conducted to study the utilization of fermented palm oil sludge (LSF) using neurospora sp for layer. The present study was done based on Randomized Design in which 100 layer were distributed to five treatment group as follow: Layers were fed diet with (0, 5, 10, 15 and 20% LSF). Experimental results showed that LSF significantly (P < 0.05) affected egg mass production, feed comsumption, feed conversion, and HU and highly affected (P < 0.01) yolk colour. The best treatment was with 10% LSF. LSF had no effect on egg weight, shell thickness, albumen index and yolk index (P > 0.05). LSF reduced egg smell, improved taste of egg and yolk colur (P < 0.05). Protein and fat, contents of eggs were significantly reduced (P < 0.05) and cholesterol content of eggs was significantly reduced (P < 0.01). Utilization LSF increased the content of β-karoten yolk (P < 0.01), and modified the composition of amino acid in yolk. In conclusion, utilization of LSF improved egg quality, reduced egg cholesterol dan lipid and modified the composition of amino acid in yolk. Key Words: Palm Oil Sludge, Neorospora sp, Egg Quality
Utilization of complete rumen modifier on sheep fed high fibrous forages. Thalib, Amlius; Widiawati, Yeni; Haryanto, Budi
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 15, No 2 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i2.647

Abstract

A research to improve livestock productivity and lower enteric methane production on ruminant was conducted by manipulation approach on rumen system using a complete rumen modifier (CRM). An in vivo experiment was carried out using twenty four sheep ( mean weight 18 kg) which were distributed into 3 treatment groups of feed additive: I. control ( without treatment: K); II: K + CRM-LG; III: K + CRM-EL. Diet given consisted of fermented rice straw (ad libitum) + concentrate containing 16 % protein (400 g/head/day), and drinking water was given ad libitum. The experiment was conducted for 14 weeks based on completely randomized design. By the end of the experiment, animals were placed in the metabolism cages for 2 weeks (ie. 1 week for adaptation and 1 week for data collection). Rumen liquid of each treated animal was taken for the measurement of rumen characteristics. Parameter measuremed were: total gas production; gas composition of CO2 and CH4; in vitro DMD; NH3 and VFA contents; pH; bacterial and protozoal counts; consumption/ DMI; in vivo DMD; ADG and FCR. The results showed that productivity of sheep was improved by CRM treatments followed by lowered enteric methane production. The ADG values of CRM treatments (71.4 to 73.5 g) were significantly higher (P < 0.05) than that of control (50 g). The improvement of average daily gain was followed by a better feed conversion (P < 0.05) (ie. 10.6 vs. 12.8). The CRM treatments lowered the percentage of CH4 by 24% compared to Control (P < 0.05). The total and composition of VFA of CRM-treated rumen liquor were significantly different (P<0.05) compared to that of rumen liquor of Control (ie. the total VFA: 85.3 vs 73.5 mM and the percentage of acetic acid: 67.8 vs 60.3%). It is concluded that CRM treatment resulted in positive effects on growth of ruminant fed high fibrous forages such as rice straw and could lower enteric methane production. Key Words: Rumen Modifier, Productivity, Enteric Methane, Sheep, Rice Straw
In vitro slow-release urea contained in rice straw-based diets to increase efficiency of rumen microbial protein synthesis Kardaya, Dede; Wiryawan, K.G; Parakkasi, A; Winugroho, H.M
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 15, No 2 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i2.648

Abstract

Effect of slow-release urea on efficiency of rumen microbial protein synthesis (EMPS) was examined using an in vitro technique. The objective of this experiment was to reveal the in vitro slow-release urea characteristics of zinc-urea, zeolites-urea, and zeolites-zinc-urea in relation to EMPS observed in different incubation time. The experimental design employed was randomized block design with 4 x 3 factorial plus a control treatment, and conducted in two replications. Factors were various urea sources (urea, zinc-urea, zeolites-urea, and zeolites-zinc-urea) and molasses concentrations (0%, 6%, and 12%) in rice straw-based diets. The control treatment was the rice straw-based diets containing neither urea nor molasses. Diets consisting of 45% rice straw and 55% concentrates (DM basis) were formulated to have similar N and TDN levels. Responses of parameters measured were subjected to MANOVA using the GLM procedure of SPSS 16.00 and differences among mean values, if applicable, were examined using HSD-test. Orthogonal comparisons were used to determine the effects of the control treatment vs. various urea sources. Results indicated that treatment of UZ combined with 6% of molasses showed the highest microbial biomass production (2.71 mg/l) at 24 hours fermentation period with its peak production estimation (3.2 mg/l) reached at 33.5 hours of fermentation period. Moreover, UZ treatment resulted in the highest microbial protein synthesis (1,381.45 ± 77.1 mg/l) at 24 hours fermentation period with its peak microbial protein synthesis estimation (1,756.04 mg/l) reached at 33.7 hours of fermentation period. The highest EMPS (25.98 ± 1.21 mg/100 mg OMD) was achieved when ration contained 6% of molasses. Key words: Slow-Release Urea, Microbial Protein Synthesis, Microbial Biomass, In vitro
Profile of blood glucose and ultrastucture of beta cells pancreatic islet in alloxan compound induced rats Suarsana, I Nyoman; Priosoeryanto, B.P; Bintang, M; Wresdiyati, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 15, No 2 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i2.649

Abstract

Diabetes is marked by elevated levels of blood glucose, and progressive changes of the structure of pancreatic islet histopathology. The objective of this research was to analyse the glucose level and histophatological feature in pancreatic islet in alloxan compound induced rats. A total of ten male Spraque Dawley rats of 2 months old were used in this study. The rats were divided into two groups: (1) negative control group (K-), and (2) positif induced alloxan group (diabetic group =DM). The rats were induced by a single dose intraperitonial injection of alloxan compound 120 mg/kg of body weight. The treatment was conducted for 28 days. Blood glucose levels of rats were analysed at 0, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days following treatment. At the end of the experiment, rats were sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Pancreas was collected for analysis of histopathological study by Immunohistochemical technique, and ultrastructural study using transmission electron microscope (TEM). The result showed that Langerhans islet of diabetic rat (rat of DM group) showed a marked reduction of size, number of Langerhans islet of diabetic rat decrease, and characterized by hyperglycemic condition. By using TEM, beta cells of DM group showed the rupture of mitochondrial membrane, the lost of cisternal structure of inner membrane of mitocondria, reduction of insulin secretory granules, linkage between cells acinar with free Langerhans islet, and the caryopicnotic of nucleus. Key words: Alloxan, Beta Cells, Rat, Blood Glucose, Immunohistochemistry
Relative superiority of Boer x Kacang goats at pre-weaning Mahmilia, Fera Mahmilia; Doloksaribu, Meruwald
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 15, No 2 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i2.650

Abstract

productivity expected from these crosses is the effect of heterosis or hybrid vigor. Boer goat is selected to improve the productivity of local Kacang goats, because this goat has a high genetic potential and has a large body formation. The objective of this research was to evaluate relative superiority of crossbreed between Boer and local goat (Kacang) during pre weaning period. The research was conducted at Goat Research Station, Sei Putih-North Sumatra, from Januari 2007 to December 2009. During pre weaning period the kids were reared with their mothers in group pen. Research results showed that birth weight and weaning weight of crossbreds (Boerka 1 and Boerka 2) were heavier than that of Kacang goat. The relative superiority of the crossbreds were 21,89 - 43,20% for birth weight, 32,88 – 54,68% for weaning weight and 37,11 – 53,32% for pre weaning daily gain. In addition the degree of mortality at pre weaning period of crossbreeds was lower than that of Kacang goats. Key words: Kacang Goat, Boer, Boerka, Relative Superiority
Satin and their crossbred rabbit production Brahmantiyo, Bram; Raharjo, Y.C; Martojo, H; Mansjoer, S.S
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 15, No 2 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i2.651

Abstract

Rabbit productivity in intensive management to be evaluated considering development in the rabbit farming were rapidly increased. Rex, Satin and their crossbred (Reza) rabbits have been developed in Research Institute for Animal Production and productivity information of each breed can be used as basis for policy or model of cultivation and breeding in the community. Research conducted by evaluating the productivity of growth, carcass and the carcass proportion of the three strains of rabbit. Rex and satin growth were no different, and Reza was higher at 12-14 weeks of age. Carcass production comes from cutting the rabbit at the age of six months, this trait is strongly influenced by the weight of rabbits, and Reza gives the lowest performance compared to Rex and Satin. Rex, Satin and Reza were medium type rabbits with dual-purpose product (fur and meat). These rabbits showed the childs growth is good enough, to adapt the environment temperature and high food and have adequate carcass production. Key Words: Rabbit, Rex, Satin, Reza, Growth, Carcass
Analyses of fixed effects for genetic evaluation of dairy cattle using test day records in Indonesia Anang, Asep; Indrijani, Heni; Tasripin, Didin
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 15, No 2 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i2.652

Abstract

Season, rainfall, day of rain, temperature, humidity, year and farm are fixed effects, which have been reported to influence milk yield. Those factors are often linked together to contribute to the variation of milk production. This research is addressed to study the fixed effect factors, including lactation curve, which should be considered for genetic evaluation of milk yield based on test day records of dairy cattle. The data were taken from four different farms, which were PT. Taurus Dairy Farm, BPPT Cikole, Bandang Dairy Farm, and BBPTU Baturraden. In total of 16806 test day records were evaluated, consisting of 9,302 at first and 7,504 at second lactation, respectively. The results indicated that fixed effects were very specific and the influences had different patterns for each farm. Consequently, in a genetic evaluation, these factors such as lactation, temperature, year, day of rain, and humidity need to be evaluated first.  Ali-Schaeffer curve represented the most appropriate curve to use in the genetic evaluation of dairy cattle in Indonesia. Key words: Fixed Effects, Milk Production Curve, Test Day, Dairy Cattle
Assessment of the purity and characteristics of rat splenic T cells isolated by one-step discontinuous gradient of percoll Depamede, Sulaiman Ngongu Depamede
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 15, No 2 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i2.653

Abstract

T cells isolated from spleen lymphocytes of rat (Rattus rattus) have been commonly used in an immunological research. However the T cells are still contaminated with other splenic cells.  Therefore a simple and reliable technique to isolate the T cells in one step process is needed. The aim of the present study was to assess whether T cells isolated from spleen lymphocytes of rat as a model by means of discontinuous density gradient of Percoll could give pure T cells with their activities as needed in an immunological research. Isolation was carried out in 5 density gradients of Percoll i.e. 1.052, 1.063, 1.075, 1.085, and 1.122 g/ml. The purity of the cell fractions was determined by immunocytochemistry and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) methods. The activity of each lymphocyte fraction was determined through cell proliferation assays by culturing the cells in the presence of phytohemaglutinin (PHA) and Concanavalin A (Con A) as T cells inducers. The FACS results show that fraction I and II were found to contain mostly B cells and macrophages. The fractions were obtained on the layers of gradient 1.052/1.063 and 1.063/1.075. Fraction III (gradient 1.075/1.085) contain T cells (43.2%) which consisted of CD4 (34.4%) and CD8 (18.6%), B cells (36.5%), and macrophages (10.0%). Fraction IV was strongly expressed T cell receptors (76.2%) which consisted of CD4 (63.6%) and CD 8 (20.0%), while B cells were found 20.0% and macrophages just about 0.6%. The activity of T cells as expressed by their respond to PHA and Con A shown that fraction III gave the most positive response, while fraction IV which contained the most ‘pure’ T cells gave less activity. From the present study it can be concluded that the discontinuous density gradient of Percoll method can be used to isolate and purify T cells in one step process. Furthermore, the present study indicated that T cells to proliferate in response to mitogen require other immune cells such as B cells and macrophages. Key words: Percoll, Lymphocyte, T Cell, Rat, Mitogen
Protection of inactive intranasal ántrax vaccine to Bacillus anthracis infection Priadi, Adin; Natalia, Lily; Adji, Rahmat S.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 15, No 2 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i2.1107

Abstract

Ánthrax is an endemic zoonotic disease distributed in many parts of Indonesia. Although vaccination program has been implemented in many areas, cases are still frequently reported. Farmers are reluctant to vaccinate their livestock since spore vaccine used in the field often cause side effects and death of the animals. To overcome this problem, an inactive vaccine composes of Bacillus anthracis toxins, cell wall and capsule subunits was developed. B. anthracis Sterne strain (34F2) was selected to produce toxins and cell walls. Local Bacillus anthracis isolated from Citaringgul was used to produce capsule as the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) revealed that this isolate poses cap gene encoding for capsule. Two vaccines compose of 15 μg toxoid, 30 μg of capsule, 15 μg of cell wall and 30 μg toxoid, 60 μg of capsule, 15 μg of cell walls were designated as vaccine I and vaccine II respectively. For each experiment, 10 mice were nasally immunized by placing 5 μl of vaccine into each nare 3 times at 2-week intervals. A group of 10 mice were unvaccinated and used as control. Blood was collected fortnightly to monitor antibody responses. All mice were challenged with 2 x 105 B. anthracis Sterne spores injected subcutaneously two weeks after the last vaccination. Two weeks after vaccination of antibodies to B. anthracis toxin, capsule and cell wall were detected in dot-blot assay. Mice that were immunised intranasally with chitosan adjuvanted vaccine developed high IgG responses in sera as detected by ELISA, and the response was dose dependent. Vaccine II gave better response than vaccine I. Vaccine I and II protected mice from challenge at a rate of 60 and 80% respectively. This results showed that intranasal B. anthracis vaccine composes of toxin, capsule and cell wall with chitosan as an adjuvant gave a good protection against B. anthracis Sterne spores challenge in mice. Key Words: Inactive Intranasal Ántrax Vaccine, Protection, Bacillus anthracis, Mice

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