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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Search results for , issue " Vol 15, No 1 (2010): MARCH 2010" : 10 Documents clear
Morphological diversity and genetic differentiation of PO cattle in smallholder farmers ., Hartati; ., Sumadi; ., Subandriyo; Hartatik, Tety
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 1 (2010): MARCH 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (155.518 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i1.680

Abstract

PO cattle is one of  the local cattle with high genetic diversity. The aim of this research was to study genetic diversity of PO cattle in smallholder farmer  based on morfology and molecular markers. This research was conducted at breeding center in East Java and Central Java include Tuban, Lamongan and Blora regency, since June until December 2008.  PO bull used were of 18 months until 24 months of age and cow of 24 months until 36 months of age or at first calving as much as 30 head each location. The variables measured were body weight, body length, withers height, hip height, shoulder point width, chest girth, chest depth, canon bone circumference, head length and head width. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistic, average analysis between subpopulations, discriminant and canonical analysis and mahalanobis distance was done by SAS DISCRIM procedure. Whole blood were collected to get the data of polymorphism DNA microsatellite using technology of PCR and electrophoresis using 6 microsatellite loci. Variable measured were number and size of  alel, alel frequency, heterozygosity,genetic distance and fixation index (F-stat). Data were analyzed using analysis of Microsate Toolkit, GENEPOPV4, MSA (Microsatellite Analyser) and Mega 4. The result showed that Blora and Tuban subpopulation have genetic diversity which is relative lower  compared to that of Lamongan. The genetic distance which was close presented by Tuban and Blora subpopulation while Lamongan and Tuban subpopulation show far genetic distance. The result of canonical analyses showed  high correlation on shoulder point width, head width, body length, withers height and hip height variable so this five variable can be used as distinguishing variables among subpopulation. The result of molecular genetics analysis using microsatellite showed that highest frequency of alel presented by HEL9 locus at Tuban population so this loci have the high polymorfism. The genetic differentiation among subpopulation showed by differentiation FST value among six loci  indicating the increasing of inbreeding in  the three subpopulations. Key words: Morphological Diversity, Genetic Differentiation, PO Cattle
Effect of mixing banana stem juice and subsequent heating on rumen degradability of soy bean meal Yulistiani, D; Puastuti, W; Mathius, I.W
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 1 (2010): MARCH 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (88.899 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i1.671

Abstract

The study was conducted to evaluate the rumen degradability of soy bean meal when it was mixed with banana stem juice and was subsequently heated.  Banana stem juice was used as source of tanin to protect protein in soy bean meal from degradation in the rumen. The banana stem juice (in volume) was mixed with soy bean meal at three ratio, which were 1 : 1, 1:2 and 1 : 3 (w/v). These mixing was then heated at 60oC and 90oC. The heating was done in an oven. Sample from each treatment was then filled into polyester bag with porosity of 45 mm and the size of 5 x 9 cm. The bags were incubated in the rumen of fistulated sheep for 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24 and 48 hours. The experiment was carried out in factorial 3 x 2, with three levels of banana stem juice and 2 levels of heating and was arranged in completely randomized design. Untreated soy bean meal was also incubated used as  control. Degradation data of dry matter and crude protein at each incubation time was fitted into exponential equation,  P = a + b (1 - ect). Results shows that there was a significant interaction factor of stem juice ratio and heating on water soluble substrate (constant A) where heating at 90oC with ratio 1 : 2 (w/v) resulted in the highest a. The insoluble but fermentable substrate (B) was decreased by the increasing concentration of banana stem juice, while the rate of protein degradation of b fraction was lower compared to control. In conclusion, banana stem juice can reduce the rate of degradation of soy bean meal in the rumen. Key words: Degradation, Crude Protein, Soy Bean Meal, Banana Stem Juice
The suplementation of fibre degrading enzymes and phytase in poultry diet on the performance of broiler chickens Tirajoh, Sisca; Piliang, W.G.; Ketaren, P.P.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 1 (2010): MARCH 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (123.168 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i1.676

Abstract

Most poultry feed in Indonesia are imported while some of local feed such as rice bran is available throughout the year. Rice bran contains fiber and phytic acid so it needs to be supplemented with degrading enzymes and phytase to be used as poultry feed. This experiment was aimed to evaluate the effect of various levels of degrading enzymes and phytase on performances of broiler chickens fed diet containing rice bran. Based on Completely randomized design, a number of 280 of day old chicks (unsexed) were allotted to receive 7 experimental diets: (i). P1 = basal diet (control); (ii). P2 = P1 + natugrain: xylanase 1650 EXU + β-glucanase 1200 BGU/kg; (iii). P3 = P1 + phytase 500 FTU/kg; (iv). P4 = P1 + phytase 1000 FTU/kg; (v). P5 = P1 + fibre degrading enzymes (PU42 + BS4) 7,5 unit /kg; (vi). P6 =  P1 + fibre degrading enzymes (PU4-2 + BS4) 7.5 unit /kg + phytase 500 FTU/kg; (vii). P7 = P1 + fibre degrading enzymes (PU4-2 + BS4) 7.5 unit/kg  + phytase 1000 FTU/kg. The chickens were fed and given water ad lib for 6 weeks and then some were slaughtered for carcass evaluation. Results showed that supplementation of 1000 FTU/kg phytase to the diet improved feed efficiency and percentage of breast weight of chickens significantly (P<0.05). Supplementation of other levels of phytase, fiber degrading enzymes and its combination levels into the diets did not affect feed consumption and live weight gain of the chickens. Key words: Broiler Chickens, Fiber Degrading Enzymes, Phytase
Additional micromineral Mn and Cu in ration to rumen biofermentation activities of sheep in vitro method Fathul, Farida; Wajizah, Sitti
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 1 (2010): MARCH 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (124.978 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i1.672

Abstract

Ruminants need micro mineral for both their own requirements and rumen microbe activities. The objective of this research was to study the effect of Mn, Cu, and its combination addition in ration on the activity of in vitro fermentation using sheep rumen liquid. This research was conducted at Laboratory of Ruminant Nutrition Faculty of Animal Science Bogor Agricultural Institute. The rations were R0 = basal ration; R1 = basal ration + 40 ppm Mn; R2 = basal ration + 10 ppm Cu; dan R3 = basal ration + 40 ppm Mn + 10 ppm Cu. The result indicated that addition of Mn, Cu, or Mn+Cu did not significantly influence (P>0.05) pH, NH3, bacteria and VFA; but they significantly increased (P<0.01) dry matter digestibility (DMD) and organic matter digestibility (OMD). The average: pH was 4.78 ± 0.07 – 4.89 ± 0.06; NH3 was 6.77 ± 2.07 – 7.47±0,67 mM, and VFA was 93.19 ± 55.79 – 136.61±15.31 mM.  R1 gave the highest value of DMD (57.63%) and OMD (70.32%). The VFA related positively to NH3 (r = 0.86); with the equation Ý = -266.9 + 54.182 X and R2 = 0.74.  It was concluded that additional of Mn, Cu, or Mn+Cu did not alter pH, NH3, and VFA. The additional of Mn altered DMD, but additional of Mn+Cu reduced DMD and OMD. Key Words: pH, NH3, VFA, DMD, OMD
Sensory quality and fatty acids composition of male local duck meat with Santoquin, vitamin E and C suplementation in ration Purba, Maijon; Laconi, E.B; Ketaren, P.P; Wijaya, C.H; Hardjosworo, P.S
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 1 (2010): MARCH 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (193.635 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i1.677

Abstract

Fishy odor is one of off odor attributes local duck meat. Off odor reduces consumer preference on duck meat. This experiment was conducted to evaluate effect of fish meal levels and antioxidant in diets on the off odor intensity and fatty acid composition of local duck meat. The experiment was designed based on 2x3factorial experiment. The first factor was two fish meal level: low (TIR) and high (TIT), and second factor was three antioxidant level: none, 150 ppm santoquin (Sq) + 400 IU vitamin E (VE), and 400 IU vitamin E (VE) + 250 mg vitamin C (VC)/kg diet. One hundred and twenty MA (Mojosari♂ x Alabio♀) day old male duck were allocated into six treatments: (1) TIR, (2) TIR + 150 ppm Sq + 400 IU VE, (3) TIR + 400 IU VE + 250 mg VC (4) TIT, (5) TIT + 150 ppm Sq + 400 IU VE, and (6) TIT + 400 IU VE + 250 mg VC. Off odor intensity on raw and boiled meat, and fatty acid composition in boiled duck meat were used as parameters. The result indicated that fish meal levels did not significantly (P>0.05) affect the off odor intensity in raw and boiled meat. However, antioxidants supplementation significantly (P<0.05) reduced off odor intensity in both raw and boiled meat. Antioxidants supplementation in diet prevented the unsaturated fatty acids from lipid oxidation in boiled meat. This experiment suggests that supplementation of 150 ppm santoquin + 400 IU vitamin E or 400 IU vitamin E + 250 mg vitamin C to the duck diets were effective in reducing off odor and hence increased the sensory quality of duck meat. Key words: Local Duck, Antioxidants, Fish Meal, Fatty Acids, Quality Sensory
Identification of Bmpr-1b and Bmp15 gene mutations in fat tail sheep ., Maskur; Arman, Chairussyuhur
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 1 (2010): MARCH 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (304.132 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i1.673

Abstract

Fat tail sheep (FTS) is regarded as highly prolific local sheep and have been well adapted under tropical climate of Lombok island. BMPR-1B and BMP15 genes that controll reproductive traits such as ovulation rate and litter size in different type of sheep will be studied as candidate genes for prolific traits in FTS. These genes  have been reported by various investigators have different prolificacy mechanism between several breeds of sheep, and it is very likely will occur in FTS. This study was designed to understand different prolificacy mechanism that occurred among breed of sheep. One hundred and forty FTS potential for twin and triplet scattered in Lombok Island, West Nusa Tenggara Province were screened to identify mutation of BMPR-1B and BMP15 genes using Forced PCR-RFLP method. Furthermore, the frequency of allel and genotype caused by mutation was measured in each gene. Results of the study indicated that mutation of FecXG at BMP15 gene resulted in two alleles, namely “wild-type”(+) Allel  was 111 bp and 30 bp, and mutan allel (G) was 141 bp with frequency of 0.675 and 0.325. The combination of allel at BMP15 gen resulted in two genotipes, namely: ++ (111 bp/111 bp) and G+ (141 bp/111 bp) with frequency of 0.35 dan 0.65 in FTS. Mutation of FecB at BMPR-1B gen resulted in two allel, namely “wild-type”(+) Allel was 140 bp, and mutan allel (B) was 110 and 30 bp with frequency of 0.718 and 0.282. The combination of allel at BMPR-1B gen resulted in three genotipes, namely: BB (110 bp/110 bp), B+ (110 bp/140 bp), and ++ (140 bp/140 bp), its frequency was 0.11, 0.35 and 0.54 in FTS, respectively. Key words: Mutation, BMPR-1B, BMP15, Fat Tailed, Sheep
The Manipulation effectivity of cell co-cultures in 5% CO2 incubation system to increase in vitro cattle embryo production Syaiful, Ferry Lismanto; BP, Zesfin; Saladin, R; ., Jaswandi; ., Hendri
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 1 (2010): MARCH 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (206.437 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i1.678

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to determine the effectivity of various cell co-cultures of cattle embryo production by in vitro CO2 5% incubation system and get the best cell co-culture. Cell co-culture which are used in the synthesis is the oviduct cells, isthmus cells, ampulla cells, follicle cells and without cells. Data were analyzed based on completely randomized desiggn. The average growth rate/ cleavage in various cell culture was: the oviduct cell 59.24%, ampulla cell  58.69%, isthmus cell 58.25%, follicle cell 52.24% and without cells 47.76%. The average  growth of 8-16 cells embryos to various cell co-culture was: the oviduct cell 46.02%, ampulla cell 45.45%, isthmus cell 45.15%, follicle cell 43.07%, and without cell 38.50%. The mean percentage of morula in various cell co-culture treatment was: the oviduct cell 20.59%, ampulla cell 20.48%, isthmus cell 20.30%, follicle cell 16.96% and without cell 12.58%. The average percentage of embryonic growth (cleavage, 8-16 cells and morula) was not significantly different (P > 0.05).  The treatment of a variety of cell co-culture increased significantly (P>0.05), blastocysts production, namely: the oviduct cell 3.28%, ampulla cell 3.22%, isthmus cell 3.08%, follicle cell 2.45% and without cell 1.97%.  In conclusion, the treatment of various cell co-culture in 5%CO2   incubation system can increace the growth of cattle embryos in vitro.   Key words: Cell Co-Culture, In Vitro Embryo, 5%CO2 Incubation System, Cattle
Supplementing energy and protein source at different rate of degradability to mixture of corn waste and coffee pod as basal diet on rumen fermentation kinetic of beef cattle Pamungkas, Dicky; Utomo, R.; Ngadiyono, N.; Winugroho, M.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 1 (2010): MARCH 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (81.431 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i1.674

Abstract

The use of corn waste and coffee pod as basal diet needs energy and protein supplementation in order to optimize rumen microbial growth. A research was done to study the appropriate supplement which is suitable based on the result of rumen fermentation kinetics. Four ruminally canulated cows, (205-224 kg of live weight) were placed in individual cages. The basal diet (BD) offered were corn waste and coffee pod mixture (80:20). Source of high degradable energy (HDE) was cassava pomace; while the low degradable energy (LDE) was arenga piñata waste. The high degradable protein (HDP) was mixed-concentrate while the low degradable protein (LDP) was leucaena leave meal. The supplementation of energy and protein to basal diet was in ratio of 50:50 based on dry matter. Feed offered were basal diet and the supplement at ratio of 60: 40 (3 % of LW). Observation was carried out for 4 periods (10 days/period). In each period, animal was fed one of the following diets:  A = BD, B = BD+ HDE+LDP, C = BD+LDE+LDP, and D = BD+HDE+HDP. Rumen kinetics observed were: pH, and VFA, NH3 and rumen microbial protein concentrations. Rumen fluid was taken at the end of each period gradually along the course of 24 hours fermentation. The results showed that the diets gave significant effect (P < 0.05) on rumen pH. The lowest rumen pH (5.76) was observed on diet D  at 2:00, 12 hours after feeding. Meanwhile, the highest pH (7.22) was found in animal fed diet A at 16:00. The total VFA on diet D of periode:1, 3 and 4 showed the highest level: 68.1 mmol/l; 75.37 mmol/l and 85.14 mmol/l respectively. The highest NH3 concentration was found in diet D followed  by diet C, B and A. At 12:00 observation or at 4 h after morning feeding the highest NH3 was observed from diet D (41.94 mg/100 ml). It is concluded that diet D resulted in the best rumen fermentation kinetic, therefore it could be used in feed formulation in cattle diets. Key words: Corn Waste, Coffee Pod, Degradation, Rumen Fermentation
Preservation of Bacillus pumilus PU4-2 xylanases by immobilization technique into pollard and cation addition Haryati, T; Marbun, P.A; Purwadaria, T
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 1 (2010): MARCH 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (156.291 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i1.679

Abstract

Utilization of by-product from agriculture as alternative source of feedstuff has been widely practiced. However their usage is limited due to high fiber content and low nutrient digestibility. The use of specific hydrolizing enzymes, xylanases are gaining importance because of their wide application in various industrial sectors especially in bioconversion of hemicellulosic material. This experiment was done to evaluate the effect of cation addition and immobilization of enzyme into pollard on stability of B. pumilus xylanase. The enzyme extract was purified by precipitation with 75% ammonium sulphate. Four kinds of cation (Ca2+, Fe3+, Mg2+, Zn2+) were added to the purified enzyme, at concentration of 1m M and stored at 4 and 27˚C. For immobilization process, the optimum enzyme concentration that will be added to pollard has been evaluated by analysis of xylanase activity and their recovery. The specific activity of enzyme after precipitation increased 1.8 times, from 420.3 to 765.2 U/mg protein. All cations act as activator which relative activity become 130.6; 139.0; 103.8 and 163.5% respectively. Concentration of 0.5mM Ca2+ and Fe3+ were most able to keep xylanases activity stable at 4˚C. The optimum composition of enzymes and pollard was 1.5 ml for 5 gram of pollard with recovery of xylanases activity of 82.2%. In immobilized enzyme, the activity of enzyme without cation addition is higher than that with addition of Ca2+ and Fe3+. Activity of enzyme stored at 4˚C is more stable than that at 27˚C. Immobilized enzyme is more stable for storage, which lasted for 7 weeks at 27˚C and 12 weeks at 4˚C compared to liquid enzyme which lasted for only 7 days at 27˚C and 13 days at 4˚C. Key words: Xylanase, Bacillus pumilus PU4-2, Preservation, Imobilization, Cation
Quality evaluation of shrimp by-product complete ration pellets Saenab, Andi; Laconi, Erika B.; Retnani, Yuli; Mas’ud, M. Sayuti
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 1 (2010): MARCH 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (575.721 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i1.675

Abstract

This research was done to evaluate the physical characteristic and chemical quality of the complete ration in pellet form that contain shrimp by-product.  The evaluation was done on several variables namely: moisture content, water activity, particle size, average collision endurance, friction endurance and angle of repose. Data obtained was analyzed based on Completely randomized design. The treatment was: R0 (complete ration without shrimps by-product), R1 (complete ration with 10% shrimps by-product), R2 (complete ration with 20% shrimps by-product) and R3 (complete ration with 30% shrimps by-product). The results showed that physical characteristic of the complete ration pellet that contain 20% shrimps by-product had the lowest moisture (13.07%) and the water activity (0.45). Based on the research, it is concluded that the best level of shrimp by-product in the complete ration was 20%. Key words:  By-Product, Pellet, Digestibility, Sheep

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