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Contact Name
Ahmadi Riyanto
Contact Email
medpub@litbang.deptan.go.id
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Journal Mail Official
ahmadi_puslitbangnak@yahoo.com
Editorial Address
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Location
Kota bogor,
Jawa barat
INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 14, No 4 (2009): DECEMBER 2009" : 8 Documents clear
Characteristics of Body Measurement and Shape of Garut Sheep and Its Crosses with Other Breeds Inounu, Ismeth; ., Erfan; Mulyono, R.H.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 4 (2009): DECEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (320.211 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i4.330

Abstract

It is important to know body measurement because it could be used to estimate body weight as well as to differentiate the chrateristic of body measurement and shape of animal due to different breed or environment. This research was carried out to study morphometric characteristic of body size and body shape from 78 of Garut sheep (GG), 29 HG sheep {crossbred between St. Croix (HH) and Garut sheep (GG)}, 36 MG sheep {crossbred between Mouton Charollais (MM) and Garut sheep (GG)}, 62 MHG sheep (MG x HG) and 38 HMG sheep (HG x MG). Body part measured were wither height (X1), rump height (x2), body length (X3), chest width (X4), chest depth (X5), hip width (X6), chest girth (X7), cannon circumference (X8) and hip length (X9). Data obeserved were analised using t test and Principle Components Analysis (PCA). Based on PCA it was showen that chest girth was the primary identity for body measurement on males and females of Garut, HG, MG, MHG and HMG with its Eigenvector value 0.689; 0.709; 0.689 and 0.681 respectively. The primary indentity for body shape of Garut sheep were chest girth and hip heigth with Eigenvector value -0.600 and 0.551 respectively. The primary indentity for body shape of HG sheep were body length with Eigenvector value -0.725. The primary indentity for body shape of MG sheep were chest girth, rump heigth, and wither heigth with Eigenvectors value: -0.600; 0.558 and 0.555 respectively. The primary indentity for body shape of MHG sheep was wither height with Eigenvector value 0.608. The primary indentity for body shape of HMG was body length with Eigenvector value 0.764. Body shape of HG and MG sheep is different than that of Garut sheep, but the body shape of MHG and HMG were close to Garut body shape. This result indicated that the adaptability to environment of HMG and MHG is close to that of Garut sheep. Key words: Sheep, Body Size, Body Shape.
Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis of dairy cows in Bogor Nugroho, Widagdo Sri; Sudarwanto, M.; Lukman, D.W; Setiyaningsih, E.; Usleber, E.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 4 (2009): DECEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (304.452 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i4.335

Abstract

Johne’s disease (JD) or partuberculosis is a chronic granulomatous enteritis in ruminants caused by infection of Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis subspecies (MAP). The disease has been detected serologically in Indonesia. It’s potential to spread to other herds and could create great economic losses. The objectives of current study were to detect MAP in milk and faeces of dairy cows as well as to evaluate the association between farm management factors and presence of the bacteria in dairy cows in Bogor. The sample size was calculated using the formula to detect disease with the prevalence assumed to be 5% using 95% significant level. Milk and faeces samples were taken from 62 dairy cows which were suspected as suffering from MAP infection. Detection of MAP was done by isolation in Herrold’ egg yolk medium with mycobactin J (HEYMj), acid-fast bacilli Ziehl-Neelsen staining, PCR IS900 and F57. Biochemical test to confirm M. tuberculosis presence was also conducted. Fifteen isolates of Mycobacterium sp. were found from the faeces samples but not from the corresponding milk samples. However, conventional PCR conducted on the isolate as well as the milk samples, gave negative results. Biochemical test proved that all Mycobacterium sp. isolates were not M. tuberculosis. This study indicated the prevalence of MAP in Bogor was less than 5%. These findings should be continued by observational study to achieve the comprehensive information at the cattle and herd level. Bovine Tuberculosis monitoring should be done also to protect dairy herd and food safety for the community. Key words: Johne’s disease, Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis, Milk, Faeces
The effect of pineapple waste (Ananas comosus (L). Merr) subtitution on mixed basal diet of Elephant grass and calliandra on rumen ecosystem of sheep Widiawati, Y.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 4 (2009): DECEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (75.402 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i4.304

Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pineapple waste substitution to mixed basal diet of Elephant grass and calliandra on rumen ecosystem. Pineapple waste was substituted to basal of Elephant grass and calliandra leaves (3:2) at the level of 0% (RA); 10% (RB); 20% (RC); 30% (RD); 40% (RE) and 50% (RF). In this experiment 24 Indonesian local male sheep (9-10 months old, 15.3 kg average body weight) were used, and were divided into 6 groups of dietary treatment (4 sheep each). Every group was offered one of the experimental diets (RA to RF) in a Completely Randomized Design. Pineapple waste was offered gradually for one month until the level of 50% (RF) was reached. The animals were adapted to experimental diets for about 14 days prior to the data collection period. Rumen fluids from each animal was taken (5 hours after morning feeding) for pH, ammonia concentration; bacteria and protozoa population analysis. The results showed that substitution of pineapple waste up to 30% had no effect on pH, but when the level was increased up to 40 and 50%, the pH (P<0.01) decreased. Ammonia concentration was similar when 10% of the pineapple waste was included, then it decreased significantly when the waste was given up to 50% (P<0.01). A decrease in bacteria population and an increase in protozoa population happened when the waste given was increased up to 50% but it wasn’t significant (P>0.05). Increasing pineapple waste given increased population of amyllolytic bacteria but decreased the population of cellulolytic bacteria. On the Elephant grass and calliandra basal diet with the proportion of 3 : 2, the best substitution of pineapple waste was up to 20%. Key words: Pineapple Waste, Rumen, Bacteria, Protozoa, Ammonia
The effect of combined probiotics with catalyst supplementation on digestion and rumen characteristic in Priangan sheep Krisnan, Rantan; Haryanto, Budi; Wiryawan, Komang G.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 4 (2009): DECEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (67.998 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i4.305

Abstract

An experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of combined supplementation of probiotics and catalyst on digestion and rumen characteristic in Priangan sheep. The trial was conducted using 16 heads of young male Priangan sheep with average initial weight of 18 kg in completely randomized design with factorial 2x2 and 4 replication. The first factor was two types of probiotics mixed with catalyst supplement, while the second factor was two levels of supplement percentage of catalyst at 0.5 and 1.0% of concentrate. The type of probiotics applied was probion and probiotics of buffaloes rumen microbes. The feeding level was set at 3% of body weight based on dry matter and consisting of forage (King grass) and concentrate at 50:50 ratio. The results indicated a significantly greater fibre digestion value (NDF) and proportion of acetate molar in the group of sheep fed combination of probiotics of buffaloes rumen microbes and catalyst supplement. It was concluded that the recommendation level of the combined rumen microbe probiotics with catalyst supplement in sheep ration was 0.5%. Key words: Probiotic-Catalyst Supplement, Digestibiliy, Rumen Characteristic, Sheep
The change of lignin, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber of palm frond with biodegumming process as fiber source feedstuff for ruminantia Imsya, Afnur; Paluli, Rizki
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 4 (2009): DECEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (96.843 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i4.328

Abstract

This research was conducted to study the effect of substrat levels and incubation time on changes of mean of: lignin, neutral detergent fiber and acid detergent fiber content of palm frond. This research was done based on completely randomized design with 2 factors as treatments. The first factor was substrate levels ie: 5, 10 and 15 litters, the second factor was incubation times: 3, 5 and 7 days of incubation which resulted in reduction content of lignin. Result of this research showed that treatments gave significantly different influence (P<0.05) on lignin, neutral detergent fiber and acid detergent fiber of palm frond. The best treatment was 15 litter of substrate with 7 days incubation, resulted in: 9.22 % lignin, 38.56% neutral detergent fiber, and 32.19% acid detergent fiber of palm frond. It is concluded that substrate level and incubation time interaction in biodegumming process decreased the level of lignin, NDF and ADF in palm frond. Key words: Biodegumming, Lignin, Neutral Detergent Fiber, Acid Detergent Fiber
Utilization of fermented rice straw as substitution of elephant grass in cow feed ., Antonius
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 4 (2009): DECEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (118.687 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i4.306

Abstract

The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of fermented rice straw by probion on feed consumption, digestibility, daily gain and feed efficiency of Simmental cow. This study was carried out based on completely randomized design, with here dietary treatments and four replications for each treatment. The treatments were R1 (JP-15) = 40% elephant grass + 15% untreated rice straw + 45% concentrate; R2 (JPF-15) = 40% elephant grass + 15% fermented rice straw + 45% concentrate; and R3 (JPF-35) = 20% elephant grass + 35% fermented rice straw + 45% concentrate. Concentrate was given at around 08:00 while unfermented/fermented rice straw was given afterward at around 09:00. Chopped elephant grass was given twice a day at 11:00 and 16:00. Water was available through out the day. Observation was done for two months on feed consumption, digestibility, daily gain and feed efficiency. The results did not show significant differences on feed consumption, digestibility, daily gain and feed efficiency, except on digestibilities of cellulose and hemicelulose. The digestibilities of cellulose and hemicelulose of treatment R3 was higher than that of R1 and R2. It is concluded that fermented rice straw is suggested to be used as an alternative feed to substitute elephant grass in maintaining feed consumption, digestibility, daily gain and feed efficiency of Simmental cow. Key words: Probion, Cow, Rice Straw
Polymorphism of Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) gene and their effect on growth traits in Indonesia native chicken Supriyantono, A.; Uhi, M.H.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 4 (2009): DECEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (144.764 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i4.329

Abstract

The research was aimed is to detect Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) gene polymorphism and their effect on growth traits in Indonesia natives chicken. Seventy two Indonesian native chicken are going to be used in this research. The polymorphism of IGF-I gene was detected by PCR-RFLP/Pst-I. Four growth traits (body weight at 1, 2, 3, and 4 months) were recorded for analyzing the association between IGF-I gene polymorphism and growth performance.The results showed that allele A (621 bp) and allele B (364 and 257 bp) were found in this research. It was found that Indonesian native chicken carried high frequencies of allele A (0.82), and frequencies of IGF-I genotypes (AA, AB, BB) were 68.0, 27.8, and 4,2%, respectively. When compared to the IGF-I genotypes, the BB genotype had the highest body weight at 1, 2, 3, and 4 month (P<0.05). The results showed that the B allele was positive of associated to a higher growth rate. Therefore, these results suggest that there is a possibility of IGF-I genotypes acting as a molecular marker for growth rate of Indonesia native. Key words: Polymorphism, IGF-I, Polecular Marker, Growth, Indonesia Native
Effect of level of lactic acid bacteria inoculant from fermented grass extract on fermentation quality of king grass silage Antaribaba, M.A; Tero, N.K; Hariadi, B. TJ.; Santoso, B.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 4 (2009): DECEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (69.454 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i4.316

Abstract

Ensiling is a method of preserving moist forage based on natural fermentation where lactic acid bacteria (LAB) ferment water soluble carbohydrate into organic acids mainly lactic acid under anaerobic condition. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of king grass (Pennisetum purpureophoides) ensiled with addition of LAB prepared from fermented grass extract (LBFG). Four treatment were (G0) king grass without additive; (G1) king grass with 2% (v/w) of LBFG; (G2) king grass with 3% (v/w) of LBFG; (G3) king grass with 4% (v/w) of LBFG. Ensiling was conducted in bottle silos of 225 g capacity at room temperatures (27.0 ± 0.20C) for 30 days. The results showed that crude protein content in silage G1, G2 and G3 were relatively higher than that in silage G0. The pH value, butyric acid, total VFA and NH3-N concentrations decreased linearly with increasing level of LBFG addition, while lactic acid concentration increased linearly with LBFG addition. It was concluded that addition of 3% (v/w) of LBFG resulting a better fermentation quality of king grass silage than 2% and 4% (v/w) of LBFG. Key words: Silage, Lactic Acid, Fermentation, King Grass

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