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Ahmadi Riyanto
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medpub@litbang.deptan.go.id
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ahmadi_puslitbangnak@yahoo.com
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Jawa barat
INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 10 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 14, No 3 (2009): SEPTEMBER 2009" : 10 Documents clear
Polymorphism of Pituitary-Specific Transcription Factor-1 (Pit-1) Gene at Locus (Pit-1-Hinf1) and its effects on dam body weight and milk production of local sheeps Sumantri, C.; Herdiana, D.; Farajallah, A.; Rahmat, D.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 3 (2009): SEPTEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (302.36 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i3.344

Abstract

Pituitary-Specific Transcription Factor-1 (Pit-1) is a transcription factor with critical role in the transcriptional regulation of multiple genes in the pituitary. The objective of this research was to identify polymorphism of Pituitary-Specific Transcription Factor-1 (Pit-1) gene at Locus (Pit-1-Hinf1) and to investigate any possible associations of Pit-1 genotypes on dam body weight, milk production and milk quality in local sheep at the Jonggol Animal Science Teaching and Research Unit (JASTRU), Fact. Anim. Sci. Bogor. Agric. Univ. A total number of 161 blood samples were collected from 3 local sheep, namely Garut from Wanaraja (55 hd), Garut from Margawati (23 hd) and lactating ewes (83 hd) from JASTRU  farm in Bogor. Genomic DNAs were extracted by a standard phenol-chloroform protocol and amplified by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques, then PCR products were digested with a Hinf1 enzyme restriction. Fragments of Pit-1gene at locus Pit-1-Hinf1 was detected by a silver-staining method. A length of 637 base pairs (bps) of the Pit-1 gene of local sheep was successfully amplified. The Hinf1 restriction enzyme cut the PCR product into three different length of fragments succesively at 345, 137, and 115   bps designated as A allele; whilst B allele had four fragments at 283, 137, 115, and 62 bps respectively. The locus of Pit-1-Hinf1 was polymorphic in local sheep from Jonggol, however it was monomorfic in Garut sheep. The frequencies of A and B alleles were 0,806 and 0,194 respectively. Pit-1 genotypes had no significant effect on dam body weight and milk production. This result is indicating that the use of single locus Pit-1-Hinf1 in Pit-1 gen is less effective to be used as a candidate in selecting dam body weight and milk production in these three local sheep. Key words: Local Sheep, Pit-1 Gene, Polymorphism, Dam, Milk
Improving growth rate of Bali cattle grazing native pasture in the wet season by supplementing high quality forages Mullik, Marthen L.; Permana, Bambang
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 3 (2009): SEPTEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (150.538 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i3.340

Abstract

This grazing experiment aimed at assessing effects of providing high quality forage as supplements for Bali cattle grazing native pasture in the wet season. Twenty four Bali heifers with a mean live weight of 85.4±3.8 kg were allotted into four reatments. The treatments were (1) grazing only, (2) grazing + Gliricidia sepium leaf, (3) grazing + Acacia villosa leaf, and (4) grazing + Lannea grandis leaf.  The heifers grazed together on a 25 ha Bothriochloa timorensis dominant pasture during the day (0700 h to 1700 h) in wet season, and supplements were provided at night. The supplements were given in accordance to achieve 30% refusal.  Total intake was estimated by marker technique (Cr2O3). Live weight was recorded twice a month. Data were subjected to statistical analysis based on general linear model suited to a completely random design.  The results showed that growth rate of Bali heifers grazing native pasture during wet season in Timor was low (35 g/d), and providing high quality forages as supplements at night significantly improved LWG by up 205%. Yet, the magnitude of LWG response varies according to type of forage, with the best result achieved by heifers given Gliricidia sepium leaf. Key Words:  Bali Cattle, Grazing, Native Pasture, Wet Season, Supplement
Detection of deoxynivalenol and T-2 toxin in feeds by gas chromatography with Electron Captured Detector Widiastuti, R.; ., Indraningsih
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 3 (2009): SEPTEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (178.431 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i3.345

Abstract

Deoxynivalenol (DON) and T-2 toxin are trichothecene mycotoxins produced by Fusarium spp. may pose to threat animal health. This research was aimed to validate an analysis method for DON and T-2 toxin detection in feed using a gas chromatography with electron captured detector ECD (GC-ECD) and to study the contamination level of DON and T-2 toxin in feed. Samples were extracted with organic solvents and derivitized with DMAP and HFBA prior to the detection with GC. Both toxins can be detected simultaneously with satisfied validation with GC. Analysis for DON showed that 17 out of 24 corn samples were positive (0.450 to 1.126 mg/kg), none was positive for 20 rice husk samples and 1 out of 14 cattle feed samples was positive (0.043 mg/kg), whereas analysis for T-2 toxin showed that 2 out of 24 corn samples were positive (0.022 and 0.063 mg/kg), 14 out of 20 rice husk samples were positive (0.027 to 0.720 mg/kg) and 6 out of 14 cattle feed samples were positive (0.039 to 0.084 mg/kg). The study showed that DON and T-2 toxin can be detected using GC-ECD. Whereas, the analysis results from field samples showed that the feeds were still safe to be used for animal feed, however a routine surveillance is needed to minimize further potential hazards. Key words:  Deoxynivalenol, T-2 toxin, Gas Chromatography, Feeds
Nutrient digestibility and beef cattle performance fed by lerak (Sapindus rarak) meal in concentrate ration Suharti, S.; Astuti, D.A.; Wina, E.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 3 (2009): SEPTEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (150.538 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i3.341

Abstract

This research was aimed to study the use of Lerak fruit meal to improve performance and feed digestibility of beef cattle. The research consisted of two trials (in vitro and in vivo studies). The in vitro trial was screening of bioactive compounds (saponin, tanin, dan diosgenin) in Lerak fruit (including seed) and continued to evaluate the effectivity of these compounds against ruminal protozoa. The in vivo study was done using 12 Ongole Crossbreed cattle which received 1of 3 different treatments: 1) concentrate without Lerak as control, 2) concentrate containing 2.5% Lerak, and 3) concentrate containing 5% Lerak. Anti protozoal activity, daily gain, and nutrient digestibility of beef cattle were measured. Results showed that saponin concentration in Lerak extracted by methanol was higher than that in Lerak extracted by water and Lerak meal, 81.5%; 8.2% and 3.85% respectively. Lerak extracted by methanol have higher antiprotozoal activity in vitro than Lerak extracted by water. In vivo experiment showed that there were no significant differences (P>0.05) of nutrient intake and digestibility in all treatments, that means the ration had good palatability and quality. Average daily gain of PO fed 2.5% Lerak was 20% higher than that of control diet (0.9 kg/day). Key words: Sapindus rarak, Protozoa, Performance, Ongole Crossbreed, Digestibility
Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) isolated from cow milk Suwito, Widodo
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 3 (2009): SEPTEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (183.713 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i3.346

Abstract

Verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) strains are responsible for serious human illnesses. These strains are commonly found in milk. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of verotoxigenic E. coli in milk. A total of 351 milk samples, were collected from dairy farms in Bogor, Sukabumi and Cianjur. These samples were analyzed for VTEC using biochemical, serological and vero cell cytotoxicity assays. VTEC O157:H7 isolates were found in milk collected from dairy herds in Bogor and Sukabumi at rates 0.47% of 214 samples, 1.10% of 91 samples respectively, and none in Cianjur. Hemolytic E. coli isolates were found in 0.94% of 214 milk samples from Bogor, 2.2% of 91 milk samples from Sukabumi and none from Cianjur. From E. coli isolates, 53 isolates (67.95%) were verotoxigenic, consisted of: two E. coli O157:H7 isolates and 51 non O157:H7 isolates.Therefore this study showed the occurrence of VTEC in milk samples from dairy farms in Bogor, Sukabumi and Cianjur. Key words: Milk, E. coli (VTEC) O157:H7, Verotoxigenic
Extraction and isolation of Ovine Pregnancy-Associated Glycoprotein (ovPAG) from cotyledon placenta of Garut sheep Setiatin, E.T.; Sajuthi, D.; Purwantara, B.; Talib, C.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 3 (2009): SEPTEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (275.806 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i3.342

Abstract

Pregnancy-associated glycoprotein (PAG) structurally related to aspartic protease, expressed in the outer epithelial cell layer (trophectoderm) of ungulate placenta. Ovine PAG (ovPAG) synthesized by mono- and binucleic trophoblast before complete implantation at Day 14-15. Of this, ovPAG could be used as a marker for early pregnancy. The objective of study was to extract and isolate PAG from placenta of Garut Sheep collected at term and to characterize their molecular weight. The procedures included extraction of protein at neutral pH (cotyledon was thawed, minced, added PBS, blended and centrifuged), acidic (H3PO41M, pH 4,5; centrifuged) and ammonium sulfate (40% and 80% (NH4)SO4, centrifuged) precipitation; gel filtration (Sephadex-G75), anion exchange chromatography (DEAE- cellulose). Cotyledon extract was subjected to Sephadex-G75 and DEAE cellulose, and their fractions were measured their absorbances. Absorbances of Sephadex-G75 and DEAE fractions at peak were assayed for protein concentration (Bichinconinic protein assay). Continuously, these fractions were subjected to monogel SDS-PAGE and stained by Commassie Brilliant Blue. It was four different molecular weights isolating from cotyledon of Garut Sheep, namely 68.8, 36.04, 32.39 and 12.18  kDa. However, after chromatography anion exchange (DEAE-cellulose), only  three bands exist, those were  71,67;  33,64 and 30,86 kDa. Key words: Garut sheep, Pregnancy-Associated Glycoprotein (PAG), Cotyledone, SDS-PAGE, DEAE-cellulose
Inactivation of Bacillus anthracis by Gamma irradiation Natalia, N.; Priadi, A.; Irawati, Z.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 3 (2009): SEPTEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (289.628 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i3.347

Abstract

The use of Bacillus anthracis as a biological weapon heighlightened awareness of the need for validated methods for the inactivation of B. anthracis spores. Ionizing radiation is capable of causing a variety of chemical changes and biological effects on bacteria which can be due both to direct interactions with critical cell components and to indirect actions on bacteria by molecular entities formed as a result of radiolysis of other molecules in the bacterial cell. This study determined the gamma irradiation dose for inactivating B. anthracis spores and its biological effects on the bacterial characteristics. Gamma irradiation was conducted at the IRKA irradiator at the National Nuclear Energy Agency, Jakarta and cobalt-60 was used as the source of ionizing radiation (capacity of ca. 134,044 Kci). Freeze dried culture of B. anthracis in glass ampoules was irradiated using   variable doses of 30, 20 and 10 KGy. Viability, biochemical and protease enzyme characteristics of B. anthracis were evaluated before and after irradiation.  The ability of B. anthracis to degrade gelatin, haemoglobin and bovine immunoglobulin G was also tested. The results showed that ionizing radiation  was able to inactivate or kill 11,05 x 108 cfu B. anthracis by 95.37%, 99.58% and 99.99 at respective doses of 10, 20 and 30 KGy. Bacterial spores appear to be less susceptible to irradiation than the vegetative cells, because of their specific structure. The survive spores irradiated at 30kGy shows some biochemical characteristic changes. The survivors failed to degrade methyl -D-glucopyranoside and arbutine. The ability of B. anthracis protease to degrade gelatin, haemoglobin and bovine immunoglobulin G was not affected by irradiation. These findings showed that a gamma irradiation at 30 KGy effectively inactivates B. anthracis spores without changing the protease activities. Key words: Gamma Irradiation, B. anthracis Characters, Protease
Improving the nutritive values of solid heavy phase to substitute corn in laying hens diet Pasaribu, Tiurma; Sinurat, A.P.; Purwadaria, T.; Ketaren, P.P.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 3 (2009): SEPTEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (145.788 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i3.338

Abstract

Solid heavy phase (SHP), a by product material of palm oil factory obtained by ceramic filtration from liquid waste could be used as a feedstuff to replace corn in poultry diet. A series of experiment was carried out to improve nutrient value of the SHP by supplementation of enzymes and amino acids in order to increase the proportion of SHP to substitute corn in layer diet. There are three enzymes i.e.: Balitnak production (BS4), a commercial single enzyme (consist of mannanase) and comercial multienzymes were tested. All the enzymes were mixed with fresh SHP in different dose, dried and ground. The nutrient digestibility of these materials was measured in order to decide the optimum level of each enzyme. Based on this result, a feeding trial was carried out. Experimental diets were formulated to study the effect of substitusion of 25% or 50% corn with dried SHP or enzymes-treated SHP on the performances of the layers. The effect of methionine and lysine supplementation into diets contained high levels of SHP was also studied. Results showed that all enzymes studied could increase the energy (TME) of the SHP. BS4 enzyme and the commercial multienzimes, except single enzyme, also increase the true protein digestibility of the SHP. The optimum dose of each enzyme for each kg dry mater of SHP was 13.3 ml BS4, 2 g single enzyme and 3 g multienzymes. Substitution of 25% corn in layer diet with dried SHP or enzymes-treated SHP did not significantly impair the performances (hen-day egg production and FCR) of layers. However, substitution of 50% corn with SHP + multienzymes or SHP + single enzyme significantly impaired the performances of the layers. Addition of methionine and lysine amino acids restored the performance of the hens fed with SHP + commercial multienzyimes, but not those fed with high levels of SHP + commercial single enzyme. Substitution of 50% corn with SHP + BS4 enzime did not significantly impaire the performance of layers and therefore, addition of amino acids into the diet was not required. Substitution of 25% or 50% corn with dried SHP or enzymes-treated SHP did not affect the egg quality (HU, yolk color index and shell thickness). It is concluded that solid heavy phase (SHP) could be used to substitute 25 to 50% corn in layer diet, especially when the SHP was treated with BS4 enzyme. Key Words: Solid Heavy Phase, Enzymes, Amino Acids, Layer
Fixed Regression Test Day Model as a solution in predicting the genetic value of dairy cattle Indrijani, Heni; Anang, Asep
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 3 (2009): SEPTEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (161.973 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i3.343

Abstract

Genetic evaluation on milk yield production basically based on breeding value. This research was addressed to study milk production curve, for the most appropriate genetic evaluation, and the best methods in estimating genetic parameter and predicting breeding values. Data were collected from PT. Taurus Dairy Farm, consisting of 581 cows having 305 days records in first lactation (P305) and 542 cows having 305 days records in second lactation. Records used for Test Day (TD) evaluation were 5,373 for first lactation, and 4,925 for second lactation. Total records used for Test Day were 10,298. The results indicated that the most suitable curve, being able to be used for genetic evaluation was Ali-Schaeffer with the coefficient of correlation of 0.999, and the most appropriate model for estimation of genetic parameters and prediction of breeding values was fixed regression model with the regression of Ali-Schaeffer by taking account to the covariates. The genetic evaluation can therefore be conducted simultaneously by ignoring lactation levels. Key Words: Test Day, Milk Production Curve, Breeding Value, Dairy Cattle
In vitro slow-release urea characteristics under different molasses levels contained in rice straw based diets Kardaya, D.; Wiryawan, K.G.; Parakkasi, A.; Winugroho, H.M.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 3 (2009): SEPTEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (5187.297 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i3.339

Abstract

Slow-release urea characteristics of zinc-urea, zeolites-urea, and zeolites-zinc-urea were examined using in vitro techniques. The objective of this experiment was to study the in vitro slow-release urea characteristics of zinc-urea, zeolites-urea, and zeolites-zinc-urea under different molasses concentrations in relation to the ruminal fermentative changes observed in different incubation time. The experimental design employed was randomized block design with a 4 x 3 factorial arrangement plus a control treatment, and conducted in two replications. Factors were various urea sources (urea, zinc-urea, zeolites-urea, and zeolites-zinc-urea) and molasses concentrations (0%, 6%, and 12%) in rice straw based diets. The control treatment was rice straw based diet containing neither urea nor molasses. Diets consisted of 45% rice straw and 55% concentrates (DM basis) were formulated to have similar N and TDN levels. Responses of parameters measured were subjected to MANOVA using the GLM procedure of SPSS 16.00 and differences among mean values, if applicable, were examined using HSD-test. Orthogonal comparisons were used to determine the effects of control treatment vs. various urea sources following significance for the two-factor ANOVA model. Results indicated that zinc-urea, zeolites-urea, and zeolites-zinc-urea under different molasses concentrations contained in rice straw based diets decreased ruminal ammonia up to 48 hours incubation, controlled total VFA level and pH values revealed from lower NH3:VFA ratio, and improved both in vitro dry matter and organic matter degradabilities. The best impact of the in vitro slow-release urea characteristics of zinc-urea, zeolites-urea, and zeolites-zinc-urea on the ruminal fermentative changes (NH3, VFA, pH, DMD, OMD) was well attributed to the diets contained 6% molasses. Key words: Slow-Release Urea, Molasses, Rice Straw, In Vitro

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