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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 18 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 14, No 2 (2009)" : 18 Documents clear
The use of earthworm meal (Lumbricus rubellus) as anti-pullorum agent in feed additive of broiler chicken Damayanti, Ema; Sofyan, Ahmad; Julendra, Hardi; Untari, Tri
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 2 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (114.826 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i2.348

Abstract

The aim of this research was to study the use of earthworm meal (TCT) L. rubellus as anti pullorum agent in poultry feed additive (IP). The antibacterial activity of TCT against Salmonella pullorum was examined using diffusion agar method at each of the following concentrations: 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% (w/v) in 100 µL DMSO. In vivo test was conducted using 80 broiler chicken and were infected by S. pullorum with treatments of: IP0: IP contained 0% TCT, IP1: IP contained 25% TCT, IP2: IP contained 50% TCT, IP3: IP contained 75% TCT and IP4: IP contained 100% TCT. Each treatment was replicated 4 times with 4 chicks each. Feed additive was periodically fed to broiler during 7 days before and 10 days after infection. Anti-pullorum activities were evaluated using serology test, isolation and biochemical identification of S. pullorum. The results showed that 75% TCT was optimum to inhibit S. pullorum in vitro. The isolation and identification of S. pullorum results showed that 0 out of 8 (0%) broilers treated with IP4 was not infected by S. pullorum whereas 1 out of 2 (50%) broilers treated with IP0 were infected by S. pullorum. The reduction of S. pullorum prevalence as followed by increasing TCT in feed additive. In conclusion, TCT as poultry feed additive could inhibit S. pullorum infection. Key words: Earthworm Meal, Feed Additive, S. Pullorum
The Utilization of turmeric and curcuma xanthorrhiza as feed additive for broilers Sinurat, A.P.; Purwadaria, T.; Bintang, I.A.K.; Ketaren, P.P.; Bermawie, N.; Raharjo, M.; Rizal, M.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 2 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (68.877 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i2.349

Abstract

The use of plant bioactives to replace antibiotics are now widely investigated. Turmeric or Curcuma longa (CL) and curcuma xanthorrhiza (CX), are commonly used by human and known to have active ingredients as antimicrobial. Therefore a research was conducted to evaluate the possibility of using these plant bioactives to replace antibiotic in poultry feed. The bioactives concentration of the CL and CX powder were measured prior to the feeding trial and then supplemented into standard diets of broiler chikens. The levels tested in this trial were based on the active ingredients that could inhibit growth of bacteria and fungi, i.e., low, medium and high levels of the CL and CX, respectively. The combination of low level of CL + high level of CX and low level CL +  medium level of CX were also tested. A diet without feed additives and with antibiotics were used as controls. Each diet was fed from day old to 35 days old, replicated 6 times and each replication consist of 15 birds. Results showed that neither the antibiotic tested nor the turmeric (CL), xanthorrhiza (CX) nor the mixture of CL and CX gave significant (P>0.05) improvement on performances (body weight, FCR and mortatlity), nutrient digestibility of feed and carcass yield of broilers. Key Words:  Broilers, Curcuma Longa, Curcuma Canthorrizhol, Bioactive
The performance of Nagrak and Kampung chicken kept intensively in Cibadak Sukabumi, West Java Nataamijaya, Achmad Gozali
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 2 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (134.382 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i2.350

Abstract

A study on the performance of Nagrak and Kampung chicken under intensive management system was conducted in Cibadak District of Sukabumi West Java. As many as 200 hens of Nagrak and Kampung, each were placed in individual cages. The birds were given 90 g of diet daily, the diet was the mixture of layer commercial diet and ricebran at equal ratio, drinking water was given ad libitum. Artificial insemination was conducted every three days using semen collected from 20 cockerels of each local bird. Disease control was done by vaccination against Newcastle Disease and Infectious Bursal Disease. Sulfamix and antibiotics were given whenever needed. Eggs were collected twice a day, weighed and stored to be incubated or to be analyzed for their characteristics. Parameters observed were physical appearance, hen-day egg production, egg quality, egg fertility and hatchability, body weight, feed conversion and mortality. Results showed that Nagrak chicken physical appearance was different from that of Kampung chicken, yet their hen-day production were not significantly different (26.93 ± 14.10% vs 27.04 ± 16.20%). The egg characteristics of these birds (Nagrak vs Kampung) were as follows: egg weight (36.29 ± 6.50 g vs 35.55 ± 5.42 g); yolk weight (16.61 ± 1.34 g vs 16.22 ± 2.11 g); albumen weight (17.31 ± 2.64 g vs 16.87 ± 1.35 g); shell weight 37 ± 0.81 g vs 2.46 ± 0.54 g); yolk color (9.62 ± 1.81 g vs 9.67 ± 1.70 g); haugh unit (83.60 ± 5.41 vs 83.45 ± 6.10); shell thickness (24.0 ± 0.83 µm vs 24.4 ± 0.67 µm), however no significant difference was found. Neither the egg fertility, hatchability nor mortality rate of the birds was significantly different. At 12 weeks old the average body weight of male Nagrak chicken (1260.04 ± 57.33 g) was much higher (P<0.01) than that of male Kampung chicken (750.68 ± 60.11 g) while the average body weight of female Nagrak chicken (980.37 ± 48.11 g) was much higher (P<0.01) than that of female Kampung chicken (656.11 ± 58.47 g). The feed conversion ratio of male Nagrak chicken (4.21) was better (P<0.05) than that of male Kampung chicken (5.62), the feed conversion ratio of female Nagrak chicken (5.15) was also better (P<0.05) than that of female Kampung chicken (6.81). No significant difference was found on the feed conversion ratio of Nagrak hens (9.24) and Kampung hens (9.06). Key words: Performance, Nagrak, Kampung, Local Chicken
Effects of inclusion Aspergillus niger fermented shrimp waste meal in broiler diets on live performance and digestive organ weight Djunaidi, Irfan H.; Yuwanta, Tri; ., Supadmo; Nurcahyanto, M.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 2 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (114.309 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i2.351

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of the inclusion of different levels of shrimp waste meal fermented with Aspergillus niger (LUF) in diets on growth performance and digestive organ weight of broilers. A total of 75 d-old chicks were randomly allocated to 5 (five) treatments in 3 replication pens of 5 birds each. Treatments consisted of LUF inclusion of 0 (control), and 5, 7.5, 10 and 12,5% (P0, P1, P2, P3 and P4) in the diets. Birds were raised under standard condition and provided with feed and water ad-libitum. Feed and birds were weighed weekly up to 35 days to determine body weight, feed intake and feed conversion. At the end of experimental period, the birds were slaughatered and dressed up to determine carcass percentage and digestive organ weight. There was a significant negative linear response in body weight, feed consumption and feed conversion with increase of LUF more than 7.5% in the diets until 35 days of age, but % carcass was almost the same for all treatment. There was no significant response in digestive organ weight with increasing levels of LUF. The present result indicated that LUF could be considered as a potential feed ingredient as protein source of broiler but its inclusion should be limited until 7.5% of the diet to maintain growth performance and digestive organ weight. Key words: Shrimp Waste Meal, Broiler, Growth Performance, Digestive Organ Weight
Quantification of the efficiency of rumen microbial protein synthesis in steers fed green tropical grass Mullik, Marthen L.; Poppi, Dennis P.; Mclennan, Stuart R.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 2 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (77.542 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i2.352

Abstract

The rate of rumen microbial crude protein (MCP) supply to the intestines is a crucial element in the current rumen models to predict respond of ruminants to a certain diet. Data from tropical pastures are always below predicted results from the existing rumen models. Thus, quantification of the rumen MCP supply from tropical forage will improve predictive rate under tropical feeding conditions. Four Brahman crossbred steers (457 ± 20.1 kg) were used in a metabolism study. Pangola grass (Digitaria erianthe cv. Steudal) was harvested every morning and fed to the animals soon afterward. Parameters measured were EMPS, intake, fractional passage rates, and rumen ammonia concentration. The EMPS was estimated using purine derivative excretion in urine. Mean crude protein and water soluble carbohydrate was 6.3 and 7.4% of dry matter (DM) respectively. Mean DM intake was 1.6% liveweight. Average rumen ammonia concentration was 69 mg/L whilst rumen passage rates were 7.84 and 6.92%/h for fluid and solids respectively. Mean EMPS was only 72 g MCP/kg digestible organic matters. It is concluded that EMPS in steers consuming green pangola grass was at the level below the minimum recommended value for forage diets adopted in the current feeding standards. Key words: Microbial Protein, Efficiency, Tropical Grass, Cattle
Coat colour pattern in Garut sheep and its crossbred Inounu, Ismeth; Ambarawati, D.; Mulyono, R.H.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 2 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (211.937 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i2.353

Abstract

Coat colour is a qualitative trait whose expression is controlled by genes and could be used as a characteristic of sheep breed and could be used as a trade mark for certain sheep breeder enterprise. The research was done to study the coat color pattern in Garut sheep and its crossbred. In this study 178 heads of sheep was used which consisted of 64 Garut sheep (GG); 24 MG sheep (50% M and 50% G); 14 HG sheep (50% St. Croix and 50% G); 20 HMG sheep and 56 MHG sheep. HMG and MHG sheep are compost of 25% St Croix; 25% M. Charolais and 50% Garut. Phenotypic observation of coat colour were done by visualization and from the picture of sheep as individual identity in each position from the right; the left, front and rear sites. Sheep coat colour pattern in this study was largely determined by 5 main alleles: white or tan (65.7%), wild (17.4%), badgerface (14.6%), Light badgerface (0.6%) and black and tan (1.7%) that present at the Agouti locus. Other locus that determine the coat colour pattern in this study are Albino (C); Australian Piebald (AsP); Brown (B); Extension (E); Pigment Head (Ph); Roan (Rn); Spotting (S); Sur Bukhara and Sur Surkhandarya (SuB/SuS) and Ticking (Ti) all of these locus increase the variation of coat colour pattern. Key words: Coat Colour Pattern
Verification for the control of kappa-casein gene on milk protein yield of friesian-holstein in dairy central region of West Java Anggraeni, A.; Sumantri, C.; Farajallah, A.; Andreas, E.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 2 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (202.262 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i2.354

Abstract

Genotipe of BB kappa kasein (ĸ-kasein) gene positively influences high milk protein yield. The aim of this research was to verify the use of the к-casein gene as marker of assisted selecion (MAS) of high protein yield in domestic Holstein-Friesian (HF) cattle. Genotyping blood samples was conducted for lactating cows from BPPT-SP Cikole (82 head) and a number of small holders in KPSBU Lembang (190 head). Genotyping the к-casein gene was also conducted for active and non active AI bulls (HF) from BIB Lembang (25 head) and BBIB Singosari (32 head). Varian genotipes were identified trough DNA migration, whereas frequencies of alleles were calculated by Nei Method (1987). The effects of variant genotypes on protein yield and other milk component yields were studied in lactating cows (56 head in BPPT-SP Cikole and 111 head in KPSBU Lembang) by applying Least Square Means (LSM) method of the General Linear Model (GLM). Genotyping the ĸ-kasein gene resulted in three genotypes, namely AA, AB and BB, with two alleles, namely A and B. It was identified that a very limited number of lactating cows with BB genotype (0-9%). These cows produced higher protein yield around 3.37-3.84% than that of AA cows, while AB cows produced protein yield in between, though these differences were not statistically significant (P>0,05). In contrast, AA cows tended to produced higher milk fat yield than BB cows. Cows BB and AB seemingly produced higher dry matter, while both specific density and pH were not affected by variant genotypes of the к-casein gene.  The results showed that BB genotype of the к-casein gene tended to be quitely consistent in controlling high protein yield, so it would be a good oppurtinity to be used as MAS of milk protein yield in HF domestic. Key words: Protein Yield, Dairy Cattle (HF), к-Casein Gene, Genotype BB
Viability of Bali bull epididymal spermatozoa preserved at 3–5oC in Tris extender with different lactose concentrations Rizal, Muhammad
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 2 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (85.24 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i2.355

Abstract

Cauda epididymal spermatozoa could be used as an alternative source of gamete in the application of various reproductive technologies, because the spermatozoa is motile and has ability for fertilizing the oocyte. The objective of this research was to examine the effectivity of lactose in maintaining viability of Bali bull epididymal spermatozoa preserved at 3–5oC. Five testis with epididymides of Bali bulls were obtained from slaughterhouse. Epididymal spermatozoa was collected by the combination of slicing, flushing and tissues pressure of cauda epididymides with physiological saline (0.9% NaCl). Collected-spermatozoa was divided in equal volume into three tubes and diluted with Tris extender containing 20% egg yolk (control), Tris extender + 0.3 g lactose/100 ml (L0.3), and Tris extender + 0.6 g lactose/100 ml (L0.6), respectively. Diluted-spermatozoa was stored in refrigerator at 3–5oC. Quality of diluted-spermatozoa including percentages of motile spermatozoa (MS), live spermatozoa (LS), and intact plasma membrane (IPM) were evaluated every day during storage at 3–5oC for six days. Data were analyzed using completely randomized design with three treatments and five replications. Results of this study showed that mean spermatozoa concentration, percentage of MS, percentage of LS, percentage of abnormal spermatozoa, percentage of cytoplasmic droplet, and percentage of IPM of Bali bull fresh epididymal spermatozoa were 11,222.5 million cell/ml, 75, 86.75, 10.5, 14, and 86.75%, respectively. At day-7 storage, percentages of MS, LS, and IPM for L0.3 (39, 50.6, and 51.6%) and L0.6 (39, 51.4, and 51.8%) were significantly (P<0.05) higher than control (29, 41.8, and 42.4%). In conclusion, addition of lactose in Tris extender extended viability of Bali bull epididymal spermatozoa preserved at 3–5oC. Key Words: Lactose, Preservation, Epididymal Spermatozoa, Bali Bull
Effect of bacteriocin from Lactobacillus sp. Var. SCG 1223 on microbiological quality of fresh meat Usmiati, Sri; ., Miskiyah; R.A.M., Rarah
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 2 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (335.745 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i2.356

Abstract

Inhibition technology of microorganism on meat can be done biologically and chemically. Biologically, inhibition to microbe can be conducted by addition antimicrobe, for example bacteriocin that have character as biopreservative. The aim of this research was to study the microbiological quality of fresh meat with bacteriocin isolated from Lactobacillus sp. SCG 1223 storaged at certain addition and temperature with different storage time. This experiment was done based on Completely of Random Design (CRD) with factorial arragement 3 x 4 for meat kept at room temperature (270C) and 3x3 for meat kept at cold temperature (4ºC) in three replications. The first factor was addition of biopreservative: addition bacteriocin (B), without addition antimicrobia (TB), and addition of nisin (N) on fresh meat. The second factor was different storage time at room temperature (H0, H6, H12 and H18) and low temperature (D0, D14, D28). Other treatments as indicators was contaminated with indicator bacteria (S. thypimurium, E. coli, L. monocytogenes). Variable analyzed were initial TPC (Total Plate Count) and total indicator bacteria S. thypimurium; E. coli; L. monocytogenes at fresh meat, meat quality consist of total indicator of bacteria, pH value of meat; and protein level. Result indicated that bacteriocin from Lactobacillus sp. SCG 1223 isolat could inhibit bacteria growth (S. thypimurium, L. monocytogenes, and E. coli. Bacteriocin produced by Lactobacillus sp. can work at room temperature (270C) and cold temperature (40C). Nisin effectivity almost same to bacteriosin produced from Lactobacillus sp. SCG 1223 isolated from cow fresh milk in inhibiting Gram positive L. monocytogenes. Key Words: Microbiological, Bacteriocin, Lactobacillus sp. Var. SCG 1223
Coat colour pattern in Garut sheep and its crossbred Inounu, Ismeth; Ambarawati, D.; Mulyono, R.H.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 2 (2009): JUNE 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (211.937 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i2.353

Abstract

Coat colour is a qualitative trait whose expression is controlled by genes and could be used as a characteristic of sheep breed and could be used as a trade mark for certain sheep breeder enterprise. The research was done to study the coat color pattern in Garut sheep and its crossbred. In this study 178 heads of sheep was used which consisted of 64 Garut sheep (GG); 24 MG sheep (50% M and 50% G); 14 HG sheep (50% St. Croix and 50% G); 20 HMG sheep and 56 MHG sheep. HMG and MHG sheep are compost of 25% St Croix; 25% M. Charolais and 50% Garut. Phenotypic observation of coat colour were done by visualization and from the picture of sheep as individual identity in each position from the right; the left, front and rear sites. Sheep coat colour pattern in this study was largely determined by 5 main alleles: white or tan (65.7%), wild (17.4%), badgerface (14.6%), Light badgerface (0.6%) and black and tan (1.7%) that present at the Agouti locus. Other locus that determine the coat colour pattern in this study are Albino (C); Australian Piebald (AsP); Brown (B); Extension (E); Pigment Head (Ph); Roan (Rn); Spotting (S); Sur Bukhara and Sur Surkhandarya (SuB/SuS) and Ticking (Ti) all of these locus increase the variation of coat colour pattern. Key words: Coat Colour Pattern

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