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Ahmadi Riyanto
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medpub@litbang.deptan.go.id
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ahmadi_puslitbangnak@yahoo.com
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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 20 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 14, No 1 (2009)" : 20 Documents clear
Effect of enrichment of organic selenium, inorganic selenium and vitamin E in quail ration on the performances and potency of quail egg as a source of antioxidant Akil, Syahrir; Piliang, Wiranda Gentini; Hanny Wijaya, C.; Utomo, Desianto Budi; Wiryawan, I Komang Gede
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 1 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (284.156 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i1.357

Abstract

The change of life style influences human health and it contributes to many human diseases outbreak, therefore nutrition of antioxidant is required. This study was aimed to get an optimum level of combined organic selenium, inorganic selenium and vitamin E in obtaining the best production and reproduction of quails and the highest antioxidant level in quail eggs. This study was conducted from January to August 2008.  Numbers of observed quails were 720 individuals (360 female and 360 male quails). The treatments were applied when the quails were six weeks old. Nine treatment diets were: To (commercial diet), T1 (0.46 ppm inorganic Se + 43.50 ppm vitamin E), T2 (0.46 ppm inorganic Se + 87.00 ppm vitamin E), T3 (0.92 ppm inorganic Se + 43.50 ppm vitamin E), T4 (0.92 ppm inorganic Se +87.00 ppm vitamin E), T5 (0.46 ppm organic Se + 43.50 ppm vitamin E), T6 (0.46 ppm organic Se + 87.00 ppm vitamin E), T7 (0.92 ppm organic Se + 43.50 vitamin E) and T8 (0.92 ppm organic Se 0.92 + 87.00 ppm vitamin E). The design of the experimental applied was a factorial – nested design. Any significant differences among the treatment diets were analysed using Duncans test. The result of this study indicated that treatment T7 (0.92 ppm organic selenium + 43.50 ppm vitamin E) in general gave the highest content of selenium in meat, in egg albumin, egg yolk, vitamin E in egg yolk, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), activity of antioxidant, hatchability and low mortality. Key Words: Quail, Selenium, Vitamin E, Antioxidant
Performance of broiler chicken fed physically and chemically treated jatropha (Jatropha curcas) seed meal Pasaribu, Tiurma; Wina, E.; Tangendjaja, B.; Iskandar, S.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 1 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (111.945 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i1.358

Abstract

Jatropha seed meal which is a by-product of biofuel is rich in protein. Its utilization as feed ingredient is limited by the presence of several anti nutritive and toxic compounds. An experiment was conducted at the Indonesian Research Institute for Animal Production to evaluate the effect of jatropha seed meal on broiler performance. Jatropha seed meals were treated physically, chemically or their combination to reduce or eliminate the anti nutritive and toxic compounds. Then, the inclusion of untreated or treated jatropha seed meals in the diet at the level of 4% was evaluated on broiler. The experiment was done in Completely Randomized Design with 5 treatments of feed, i.e 1) control feed, 2) feed containing untreated jatropha seed meal (OO), 3) feed containing physically treated jatropha seed meal (OTO), 4) feed containing chemically treated jatropha seed meal (EHM) and 5) feed containing physically and chemically treated jatropha seed meal (EHMO). Every treatment had 7 replications with 5 chickens for each replication. The treatment diets were given to 7 days old chicken for 14 days. The observed parameter were feed intake, daily gain, feed conversion ratio, and mortality. The broiler performance recieved EHMO feed was better that those of OTO or EHM treatment (751.1; 731.2; 498.8 g of body weight for EHMO, EHM and OTO treatments, respectively), however, it was lower than the control treatment (856.3 g). Feed Conversion Ratios of EHM and EHMO treatments were not significantly different from control treatment (1.868; 1.813 vs 1.707), however, they lower than OO (2.532) and OTO (2.249) treatments. Chicken mortality of EHMO treatment was much lower than OO that of treatment (0 vs 34.29%, respectively). In conclusion, the processing technology of jatropha seed meal using combined physical and chemical treatments (EHMO) was the best choice as it gave better chicken performance without mortality compared to other techniques in this experiment. Key words: Jatropha Seed Meal, Detoxification, Broiler Chicken, Performance
The influence of cage density on growth and behavior of Tangerang-Wareng Pullets Iskandar, Sofjan; Setyaningrum, S.D.; Amanda, Y.; Rahayu H.S, Iman
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 1 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (153.84 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i1.359

Abstract

One hundred and eight pullets of 13 weeks old white Tangerang-Wareng, were allocated to numbers of wire cages. Each cage had 4050 cm2 floor space. The treatments were three cage-densities (4, 6 and 8 pullets/cage) with six replications for each treatment for growth observation, while there were other three treatments (observation times), which were 07.00-08.00 (morning), 12.00-13.00 (noon) or 17.00-18.00 (afternoon), that were applied and replicated in three for behavior observation. Commercial ration containing 20.86% crude protein, 3.22 Ca, 0.87% total P and 2982 kkal metabolizable energy (ME)/kg and drinking water were provided ad libitum. Results showed that cage density neither significantly (P<0.05) affected birds’ final bodyweight, bodyweight gain, feed consumption nor feed conversion ratio. Analysis of variance showed that there was no interaction effect of cage densites and observation times on every observed behavior variable, except on standing activity. Cage density did not significantly (P<0,05) affect behavior, except behavior of cleanning, which increased with the increase of space allocation. The presentages of eating and pecking were significantly increase in the morning, while presentage of bird having a rest increased at noon. Drinking behavior was not affected by both cage density and observation time. The most birds showed the highest activities in the morning. In general the most cage density of 8 birds/4050 cm2 of floor space (506 cm2/bird), was more likely comfortable to the birds to live. Key words: Cage Density, Tangerang-Wareng Pullet, Growth, Behavior
Altering physiological conditions and semen acidity by manipulating dietary cation-anion difference and fish oil supplemenation of Garut breed rams Hidayat, Rahmat; Toharmat, T.; Boediono, A.; Permana, I.G.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 1 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (186.724 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i1.360

Abstract

Contribution of Garut breed sheep as protein resources is not optimal yet.  Acceleration of population growth such as increasing of female offspring is neccesary.  This study was carried out to obtain information regarding the effect of dietary cation-anion difference (PKAR: meq [(Na + K) – (Cl+S)/100 g of dry matter]) and fish oil supplementation on acidity of blood and semen, blood gas and plasma and semen mineral. The dietary treatmens were as follows:   RN0= basal ration (PKAR +14) without fish oil, RNI= basal ration (PKAR +14) with 3% fish oil, RB0= base ration (PKAR +40) without fish oil, RBI= base ration (PKAR +40) with 3% fish oil, RA0= acid ration (PKAR -40) without fish oil, and RAI= acid ration (PKAR -40) with 3% fish oil.  The rations contained 150 ppm of zinc and were offered to 18 of Garut rams.  The result indicated that blood pH, pCO2, and pO2 were not affected by PKAR and fish oil supplementation, but cHCO3 and cBase were affected (P<0.05).  PKAR and fish oil supplementation affected (P<0.01) plasma Mg and S, but did not affect K, Na, Zn and Cl.  Semen pH after day 28 of experimental period were highly significant different and that followed PKAR pattern.  In conclution, PKAR affected cBase, cHCO3, concentration of Mg and S plasma and semen pH of Garut rams.  The result suggested that PKAR could be applied to manipulate physiological condition and semen pH. Key Words: PKAR, Physiological Condition, Semen, Garut Ram
Utilization of Passion fruit hulls (Passiflora edulis Sims f. edulis Deg) as component of complete feed for growing Kacang goats Simanihuruk, Kiston
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 1 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (143.113 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i1.361

Abstract

Processing of passion fruit (Passiflora edulis Sims f. edulis Deg) to produce passion fruit juice produce passion fruit hulls that is potential for feedstuff. Twenty male kacang goats (average initial body weight 17±1.24 kg) were used in an experiment to study the effect of utilization of passion fruit hulls as feed component in the complete pellet ration on their growth. The experiment was arranged in completely randomized design consisting of 4 diets and 5 replications. Animal were randomly allocated into 4 diets (0, 15, 30, 45% level of passion fruit hulls). Each diet contained 14% crude protein and 2550 Kcal kg-1 metabolism energy. The ration was offered at 3.8% of body weight based on dry matter. The result of the experiment showed that all variables observed were not affected by level of passion fruit hulls (P>0.05). Average daily gain and feed efficiency tended to decrease with the increase level of passion fruit hulls. The highest dry matter, organic matter and N intake (768,78 g h-1 d-1; 687,37 g h-1 d-1 and 17,22 g h-1 d-1 respectively) were found from R1 treatment (15% level of passion fruit hulls). It was concluded that passion fruit hulls can be used till 45% level in the diet of Kacang goat. Key Words: Passion Fruit, Complete Pellet Ration, Kacang Goat
The quality of Garut ram liquid semen in Tris egg yolk extender to the sucrose supplementation ., Yulnawati; ., Herdis
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 1 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (57.049 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i1.362

Abstract

The successful program of artificial insemination in sheep is determined by the quality of sperm that are used. Therefore, it is important to maintain the quality of sperm during and after storage in low temperature. The research was conducted to study the influence of sucrose in the Tris-yolk extender in maintaining the quality of Garut ram sperm during preservation in reaction tube for four days at 5°C. Ejaculated sperm was collected once a week for five weeks using artificial vagina from same ram. Semen was divided into four groups of extenders, i.e. Tris egg yolk 20% (TKT), TKT + 0,1% sucrose, TKT + 0,3% sucrose and TKT + 0,5% w/v sucrose. The results showed that the percentage of motility on day four (D-4) of storage in TKT (41.00 ± 2.0%) was lower (P<0.05) than that in TKT + 0.3% (48.00 ± 2.45%) and TKT + 0.5% (51.00 ± 3.74%), however there was no significant different (P>0.05) from TKT + 0.1% (45.00 ± 3.16%). Whereas the percentage of live cells (%H) on D-4 in TKT, TKT + 0.1%, TKT + 0.3% and TKT + 0.5% were 55.00 ± 2.19%; 57.20 ± 2.79%; 59.20 ± 3.25% and 61.20 ± 3.60%, respectively. Meanwhile, the percentage of membrane integrity (MPU) in TKT (51.80 ± 1.94%) was significantly different (P<0.05) from TKT + 0.3% (57.40 ± 2.65%) and TKT + 0.5% (59.20 ± 3.66%), however there was no significant different (P>0.05) from TKT + 0.1% (54.80 ± 2.86%). In conclusion, the addition of sucrose 0.3% w/v into TKT extender could maintain the quality of Garut ram sperm more efficiently and better than TKT extender. Key Words: Sucrose, Tris Egg Yolk, Preservation, Garut Sheep
Comparison of four diluents for the retriever dogs semen preservation Wicaksono, A.; Arifiantini, R.I.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 1 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (70.22 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i1.363

Abstract

The quality of chilled semen depends on the composition of diluent. The choice of the buffer, anti-cold shock and nutrition sources can be the first decision in order to choose appropriate diluents. Nowadays a lot of diluent are used for canine semen preservation such as Tris buffer and Citrate buffer. This study was aimed to observe the differences of diluent for preserving Retriever dog spermatozoa. The semen sample collected from four Retriever dogs with three times repetition. The semen was evaluated macro-and microscopically. The semen with >70% sperm motility was divided into four tubes and diluted with diluter 1 (P1), diluter: P2, P3 and P4 (modified P3). The diluted semen was divided into two tubes and each sample was stored at room and 50C temperature. The viability of chilled semen was observed every 3 hours at room temperature and 12 hours at 50C. The result showed that P2 keep the sperm viability better than the other diluents. On 50C at 24 hours storage P2 showed the highest motile and live sperm percentage (46.25 ± 0.22%; 57.11 ± 0.25%). In room temperature at 6 hours P2 showed the highest motile and live sperm percentage (40.94 ± 0.20%; 52.65 ± 0.23%). It is concluded that P2 can keep the sperm viability by 84 hours of 50C and 21 hours at room temperature. Key Words: Diluents, Dog Sperm, Retriever
Effects of irradiation on the survival of bacterial contaminants in food Natalia, Lily; Priadi, A.; Irawati, Z.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 1 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (56.987 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i1.364

Abstract

The primary concern about microbial safety of irradiated food is the survival of pathogenic spore forming bacteria. Clostridium sporogenes was selected as the spore forming test organism for conducting inoculated pack studies for its similarities to the most toxigenic Cl. botulinum, in radiation resistance. Minimum radiation dose applied (45 kGy under cryogenic condition, in -790C) was determined to eliminate Cl. sporogenes spores and other bacterial contaminants in different kind of Indonesian chicken and beef dishes. In separate studies, irradiation doses of 3 – 7 kGy at cryogenic condition was used to improve the microbiological safety of a number chilled prepared meals. The dishes or ready to eat foods were packaged in air impermeable pouches. Irradiation process was carried out after inoculation on chicken and beef dishes with certain amounts of Cl. sporogenes spores. The evaluation of colony count differences between the irradiated and unirradiated foods revealed the effect of radiation on the survival of bacterial spores or other bacterial contaminants. It was demonstrated that a minimum dose of 45 kGy under cryogenic condition eliminated the spore of Cl. sporogenes, Bacillus spp and Staphylococcus spp. Irradiation at doses 5-7 kGy significantly reduced some potential pathogenic microorganisms in samples without affecting quality up to 3 months of storage at the refrigeration temperature. Key Words: Food Safety, Irradiation, Bacterial Contaminants
Molecular characterization of Bovine herpesvirus type 1 Indonesian isolates Saepulloh, Muharam; Wibawan, I.W.T.; Sajuthi, D.; Setiyaningsih, D.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 1 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (456.846 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i1.365

Abstract

Different subtypes of bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV-1) have been associated with different clinical conditions of cattle. For that reason subtypes differentiation has become an essential tool for understanding the pathogenesis and epidemiology of BHV infections. In search for a genomic region that would allow a clear distinction between BHV-1.1 and BHV-1.2 of glycoprotein D (gD) genes of 8 Indonesian isolates were amplified and sequenced. The amino acid sequence alignments revealed that the levels of genomic similarity ranging from 98.8 to 100% among BHV-1 Indonesian isolates and its results were also similar between BHV-1 Indonesia isolates and BHV-1.1 reference, and 98.4 to 98.8% between BHV-1 Indonesian isolates and BHV-1.2 reference. The isolates could be clearly separated into BHV-1.1 and BHV-1.2 after phylogenetic analysis. The results showed that the Indonesian isolates were characterized as BHV-1.1 as agent caused respiratory tract infections in cattle or infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) disease. The results suggest that the phylogenetic analysis performed here can be used as a potential molecular epidemiological tool for herpesviruses. Key Words: BHV-1.1, BHV-1.2, Glycoprotein D, Phylogenetic Analysis, IBR
Purification of neuraminidase from Influenza virus subtype H5N1 Tarigan, Simson; Indryani, Risa; ., Darminto; Ignjatovic, Jagoda
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 14, No 1 (2009)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (306.71 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i1.366

Abstract

Influenza-virus neuraminidase plays vital role in the survival of the organisms. Vaccination of animals with this glycoprotein confers immune responses so that enable it to protect the animals from incoming infection. Supplementation of conventional vaccines with this glycoprotein increases the protection and longevity of the vaccine. Purified neuraminidase can also be used to develop serological tests for differentiation of serologically positive animals due to infection or to vaccination. In this study purification of neuraminidase from influenza virus subtype H5N1 was described. Triton x-100 and Octyl β-D-glucopyranoside were used to extract and diluted the glycoprotein membrane. The enzymatic activity of the neuraminidase was assayed using a fluorochrome substrate, 4-methylumbelliferyl-a-D-N-acetyl neuraminic acid, which was found to be simple, sensitive and suitable for the purification purpose. The neuraminidase was absorbed selectively on an oxamic-acid agarose column. The purity of neuraminidase eluted from this affinity column was high. A higher purity of the neuraminidase was obtained by further separation with gel filtration on Superdex-200. The purified neuraminidase was enzymatically active and did not contain any detectable haemagglutinin, either by haemagglutination assay or by monospecific antibodies raised against H5N1 hemagglutinin.  The purified neuraminidase was recognized strongly by antibodies raised against an internal but only weakly by that against C-terminal regions of the neuraminidase protein of H5N1-influenza virus. The purified neuraminidase was in tetrameric forms but dissociated into monomeric form on reducing condition, or mostly dimeric form on non-reducing SDS-PAGE. Key Words: Neuraminidase, Influenza, H5N1, Methylumbelliferyl, Oxamic-acid

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