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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 20 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 13, No 3 (2008)" : 20 Documents clear
Molecular analysis of Hemagglutinin Gen of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza of H5N1 Subtype Isolated from Waterfowls Susanti, R; Soejoedono, Retno D; K Mahardika, I Gusti Ngurah; T Wibawan, I Wayan; Suhartono, Maggy T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 3 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i3.584

Abstract

Avian influenza viruses (AIV) subtype H5N1 isolated from waterfowls in West Java pose the known characteristic of highly pathogenic strains, with polybasic amino acid sequence of cleavage site QRERRRKKR and QRESRRKKR. This research aimed to analyze the important domains of hemagglutinin (HA) gene of those isolates. Fragment of HA gene was amplified using RT-PCR method with specifically-designed primer pairs and sequenced using dideoxy termination method with ABI automatic sequencer (Applied Biosystems). Multiple alignment of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences were analyzed using ClustalW of MEGA-3.1 program. Some of biological domains of HA, i.e. antigenic sites, receptor binding pocket, and glycosylation sites of the isolates were polymorphic. The viruses also pose conserved glutamine (Q) and glisin (G) residues at the known receptor binding site, at the position 222 and 224 respectively. This findings clearly show that all AIV subtype H5N1 isolaed from waterfowl preservesthe α-2,3NeuAcGal avian receptor specificity. Key Words: Antigenic Sites, Glycosylation Sites, Receptor Binding Pocket, AIV H5N1, Waterfowls
Survival Analysis of the Effect of Season at Calving, Lactation Number and Breeding on Days Open in Dairy Cattle at Khon Khaen Province, Thailand Taufik, E; Suriyasataphorn, W
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 3 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i3.578

Abstract

The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of season at calving, lactation number and breeding on days open (interval between calving and conception) in dairy cattle by using Cox proportional hazards model as a survival analysis method. The data were sampled from 143 cows at 6 farms located in Khon Kaen Province, North-Eastern Thailand and classified as farm identification (FID), cow identification (CID), calving date (CDA), date at last follow up (LAF), percentage of Holstein-Friesian (PHF), lactation number (LAN) and event of interest (1 = conception, 0 = not conception) (event). Time of days open was calculated by subtracting LAF by CDA and CDA was used to determine season of calving. The result showed that based on Kaplan-Meier survivorship percentiles, overall median days open of cattle were at 210, whereas median days open for the cow calved in summer was 231 and 204 for the cow calved in other season. Median days open for the cow calved with one lactation was 226 and 207 for the cow with two lactation and more. Median days open for the cow with percentage of Holstein-Friesian <75% was 211 and 206 for the cow with percentage of Holstein-Friesian >75%. The result from Cox proportional-hazard regression of days open for Khon Khaen dairy cows showed that cows that calved in rainy and winter had a greater chance of 1.28 times and 1.76 times, respectively, of becoming pregnant than those calved in summer, although the difference was insignificant and cows with lactation number two or more were marginally had 1.54 times chance to get pregnant compare to cows with one lactation number, even though this chance was not statistically significant (P = 0.1725), whereas cows with percentage of Holstein Friesian >75% had significantly greater chance 1.17 times more to get pregnant compare to those with percentage of Holstein Friesian <75%. Key Words: Survival Analysis, Cox Proportional Hazard Model, Dairy Cow, Days Open
Supplementation of bangun-bangun leaf (Coleus amboinicus Lour) and Zn-vitamin E to improve metabolism and milk production of Etawah cross bred goats Rumetor, Sientje Daisy; Jachja, Jajat; Widjajakusuma, Reviany; Permana, Idat Galih; Sutama, I Ketut
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 3 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i3.579

Abstract

Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of Coleus amboinicus L. and zinc-vitamin E supplementation in ration to improve rumen metabolism and milk production of Etawah crossbred goat. In the first experiment, 6 treatments were evaluated using in vitro batch culture. It was found that Coleus amboinicus and Zn-vitamin E supplementation significantly (P< 0.01) increase dry matter (DM) and organic matter (OM) digestibility and Volatile Fatty Acid (VFA) concentration, but decrease NH3 concentration, rumen pH and total microbe. In the second experiment, 8 treatments were evaluated using in vivo experiment on 24 goats. The result showed that Coleus amboinicus and Zn-vitamin E supplementation significantly increase dry matter and TDN intake and milk production. Key Words: Coleus Amboinicus, Zn-Vitamin E, Rumen Metabolism, Milk Production, Etawah Crossbred Goat
Effect of Katuk leaf (Sauropus androgynus L. Merr) suplementation in the diet on reproductive function of Quail Subekti, Sri; Sumarti, Sri Susilogati; Murdiarti, Tri Budhi
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 3 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i3.580

Abstract

Katuk (Sauropus androgynus L Merr) is known to contain carotenoids, vitamin E, vitamin C, protein, and sterol compounds. This study was aimed to determine whether phytosterol in Sauropus androgynus (SA) leaf affected the reproductive system of female quails. One hundred and fifty female quails were raised from 2-27 weeks old and divided into three dietary treatment, with five replicates and 10 quails in each replicate. The treatment diets were: 1) control group: diet without katuk leaf meal; 2) diet with 9% SA ethanol extract (TEK); 3) Diet containing 9% SA meal (TDK). The TDK-fed quails laid their first eggs at 46 day of age, compared with the TEK (52 day) and the control groups (53 day). The highest fertility (94.55%) and hatchability (93.29%) were obtained from the TDK fed quails at the age of 23 and 24 weeks, respectively. These findings indicated that the reproductive system of female quails were improved not only by phytosterol in SA leaf, but also by the β-carotene, vitamin C, α-tocopherol in SA leaf. Key Words: Katuk Leaf, Fertility, Hatchability, Quail
Responses of Giving n-Hexane Jaloh Extract on Broiler Chicken which Heat Stress Condition to Expression of iNOS Enzyme in Lung Tissue, Serum level of Glucose and Calcium Sugito, Sugito
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 3 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i3.581

Abstract

Giving of extract n-hexane of jaloh bark (EHJ) can lessen impact heat stress on broiler chicken. The studies of activity of EHJ in lessening heat stress impact at broiler chicken have not been conducted yet. An experiment was conducted to study the effect of extract n-hexane of jaloh bark (EHJ) administration on body temperature, level of calcium and glucose in serum, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in lung tissue, and behaviors of broilers exposed to heat stress at temperature 33 ± 1oC. This study used 18 broilers aged 20 days which were divided into 3 groups. The first group was broilers given heat stress without EHJ (CP). The second group was treated heat stress and EHJ at dose 10 mg/kg BW (CP+EHJ). The EHJ was given 1 hour before cage temperature was raised. Broilers in group CP and CP+EHJ were divided into 3 periods of slaughtering i.e. 2 and 4 hours after given heat stress and 2 hours after heat stress termination. Each of slaughtering period consisted of 3 broilers as replication. Result of this research indicated that CP+EHJ lessen stress in the form of restlessness and increased expression of iNOS in the lung tissue. It was assumed that one of mechanism of EHJ in lessening stress on broiler related to forming of iNOS enzyme in the lung tissue. Key Words: Salix, Heat Stress, Calcium, Glucose, i-NOS Enzyme
Quality evaluation of signal grass (Brachiaria brizantha) ensiled with forage as tannin source Santoso, B; Hariadi, B. Tj
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 3 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i3.582

Abstract

This research focused on examining the possibility of using three kinds of plant leaves i.e. Acacia mangium Willd, Persea americana Mill and Psidium guajava as tannin source to signal grass (Brachiaria brizantha) silage. The silages were made from the first cut of signal grass harvested at 50 days. Four treatment silages were TA: grass ensiled without tannin as control, AM: grass ensiled with A. mangium (6 g tannin /kg fresh weight), PA: grass ensiled with P. americana (6 g tannin /kg fresh weight), and PG: grass ensiled with P. guajava (6 g tannin/kg fresh weight). After mixing, the materials were packed into glass bottle silos (225 g capacity), in triplicate, which were ensiled for 30 days. The results showed that dry matter, organic matter and crude protein concentrations in signal grass silage mixed with tannin of A. mangium were higher (P<0.01) compared to other silages. Degradations of dry matter, organic matter and crude protein during ensiling were the lowest in silage with A. mangium tannin additive. This data was supported by good fermentation quality of that silage e.g. low pH value, NH3-N and VFA concentrations, and high lactic acid concentration and Fleigh point as compared to other silages.  It is concluded that addition of tannin from A. mangium leaf at rate of 6 g/kg fresh weight improved fermentation quality and has potential as protein protection agents during the ensilage of signal grass. Key Words: Fermentation, Silage, Tannin, Signal Grass
Isolation and identification of acetogenic bacteria obtained from deer rumen and their potential for methanogenesis inhibitor Thalib, Amlius
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 3 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i3.583

Abstract

Methanogenesis can be inhibited by various chemicals through different mechanism reaktion. The use of acetogenic bacteria as H2 sink is assumed to be a promising approach. Isolation and identification of acetogenic bacteria obtained from deer rumen had been conducted. Two types of media used for isolation were hydrogen-carbondioxide utilizing acetogens and carbonmonoxide utilizing acetogens. Identification of species of acetogens isolates was based on descriptions of morphology, Gram type, motility, bioreaction results, and oksygen requirement. The compositions of methane and volatile fatty acids (VFA) were determined on minimal media or added with sheep rumen liquid innoculated with pure isolates. The identification results showed that the isolate cultured on media of hydrogen-carbondioxide utilizing acetogens was Acetoanaerobium noterae and the ones cultured on media of carbonmonoxide utilizing acetogens was Acetobacterium woodii. Inoculumn of A. noterae and A. woodii could decreased the composition of methane resulted from substrate fermented by fresh rumen liquid of sheep (CRDF), that is culture of A. noterae added FPM and defaunator decreased methane production by 28.8% (P<0.01), while culture of A. woodii added microbe growth factors (FPM) and defaunator decreased methane production by 20.6% (P<0.05). Composition of VFA resulted from fibrous substrate fermented by inoculumn of CRDF with and without combined with cultures of A. noterae dan A. woodii were not significantly different except for culture of A. noterae combined with FPM and defaunator additives was higher than CRDF (P<0.05) (ie. 122.9 vs. 97.9 mM for total VFA and 73.43 vs. 68.37% for composition of acetic acid). It is assumed that isolates of A. noterae and A. woodii could be functioned as methanogenesis inhibitor according to  the reaction of  2CO2 + 4H2 ==> CH3COOH + 2H2O by which reduction of CO2 with H2 producing CH4 can be inhibited or decreased. Their function as methanogenesis inhibitor would be more significant when they are combined with microbial growth factors and defaunator. Kata Kunci: Asetogenik-bacteria, Acetoanaerobium noterae, Acetobacterium woodii, deer, methane
Residue analysis of sulfametazine in poultry product and its prevention Sani, Yulvian; Widiastuti, Raphaella
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 3 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i3.585

Abstract

Sulfamethazine (SMZ) is a sulfonamide preparate widely used in feed to control and prevent diseases, and to promote growth. The use of sulfonamides may lead to residue formation, induce microbial resistance and suspected as a carcinogen. A serial study has been undertaken to investigate the withdrawal pattern of SMZ in meat and liver tissues in order to reduce residue of SMZ. A total of 80 day old chicken were divided into 4 groups consisting: (1) negative control without SMZ; (2) positive control dosing with SMZ for 35 days; (3) treatment-1 was dosed with SMZ for 28 days consecutively three times per week then ceased thereafter; and (4) treatment-2 was dosed with SMZ for 30 days consecutively three times per week then ceased thereafter. A field study revealed that some antimicrobials were detected in poultry meat samples, such as sulfamerazine ( = 2.52 ppb or nd – 12.62 ppb) and sulfamethazine ( = 0.02 ppb or nd – 0.09 ppb). An intragastric dosing of SMZ at 50 mg/kgBB did not affected body weight growth. Both positive control and treated groups showed haemorrhagic enteritis, nottling of capsular surface of liver and pale kidneys. Pathological changes were not found in negative control. Microscopically, pathological changes in liver, intestines and kidneys were found consistently in SMZ treatment. Withdrawal time of SMZ in broilers was between 5 to 10 days. Therefore to produce safe and healthy poultry products, sulfonamides treatment should be withdrawn 5 to 10 days prior to culling of birds and substitution of feed to unmedicated feed within this period is strongly recommended. Key Words: Residue, Sulfametazine, Poultry, Meat, Prevention
Antibacterial activity and retained protein of earthworm meal (Lumbricus rubellus) as feed additive combined with chitosan Sofyan, Ahmad; Damayanti, Ema; Julendra, Hardi
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 3 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i3.586

Abstract

This research was conducted to enhance the bacterial growth inhibition of E. coli by using earthworm (Lumbricus rubellus) meal (TCT) which was added with chitosan and its effect on the retained protein in broilers. Inhibition of E. coli growth was tested using dilution method on the nutrient broth by additional 2% TCT combined with 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5% chitosan. Retained protein was measured using broiler fed diet containing 2% TCT (w/w) and added by chitosan 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.50% of TCT (w/w). The numbers of 15 broilers Cobb strain 35 days old were arranged on Completely Randomized Design (CRD). Results showed inhibition of E. coli was increased using TCT mixed chitosan. The highest inhibition to E. coli growth obtained from TCT + 0.5% chitosan. Retained protein tended to increase up to 1% (w/w) chitosan. Otherwise, chitosan level more than 1% could reduce protein retention. It is concluded that use of 1% chitosan increased TCT capability to inhibit E. coli and protein retention in the broilers. Key Words: Feed Additive, Chitosan, L. rubellus, E. coli
Detection of Brugia malayi microfilaria/Larvae in mosquito using Polimerase Chain Reaction. Haryuningtyas, Dyah; Subekti, Didik Tulus
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 3 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i3.587

Abstract

Lymphathic filariasis that is also known as elepanthiasis is caused by infestation of 3 species nematode Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi and Brugia timori. In Indonesia 70% filariasis case caused by Brugia malayi. Mosquito species from genus Anopheles, Aedes, Culex, Mansonia and Armigeres are known as vector of this disease. Microfilaria detection on mosquito is one methode to know infection rate in vector population in endemic area.The objectives of the research were to study the ability of Hha1 repeat applicable to detect microfilaria/larvae in a pool of mosquitoes and to get description of adult mosquito night biting population lived in endemic area of filariasis brugian. Mosquito as positive control used in this research come from laboratory of parasitology of FKUI. Mosquito sample from the field was from Binawara and Kolam Kiri villages, South Kalimantan province. Mosquito were trapped then identified by its species. DNA of mosquitoes was extracted and then run by the PCR using Hha 1 repeat primer. Result of the research indicated that adult mosquitoes night biting from Binawara village consist of Culex, Mansonia, Anopheles genus and from Kolam Kiri village only from Mansonia genus. Hha 1 repeat primer is applicable to detect 1 mosquito infected with microfilaria/larvae in a pool of negative mosquitoes. Mosquito samplesfrom the two villages showing negative PCR.   Key Words: Filariasis, Brugia Malayi, Vector, Microfilaria, Filaria Larve, PCR

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