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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 22 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 13, No 2 (2008)" : 22 Documents clear
The effect of antibiotic and Morinda citrifolia waste bioactive as feed additive in layer ration Bintang, I.A. K; Sinurat, A. P; Purwadaria, Timothy
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 2 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i2.599

Abstract

A study on the use of zinc bacitracin antibiotic (ZnB) and Morinda citrifolia waste as feed additive in layer ration was conducted. One hundred and twenty pullet of Isa Brown strain were allocated into 5 treatments with 6 replications with 4 birds/replication. The treatment were: control, control + antibiotic (50 ppm Zinc bacitracin) and control + M. citrifolia waste at 3 levels (5, 10 and 15 g/kg ration). Analysis of variance was conducted in a completely randomized design. Variables measured were: feed intake, hen day (% HD), egg weight and feed conversion ratio (FCR). The results showed that feed intake of hens with M. citrifolia waste 5g/kg for 6 month was significantly (P<0.05) higher than that of control and M. citrifolia waste 10 g/kg. Between antibiotic and M. citrifolia waste was not significantly different (P>0.05). The percentage of HD with antibiotic and M. citrifolia waste did not significantly (P>0.05) differ, but tent to be higher than that of the control. Egg weight with M. citrifolia waste 5 g/kg was significantly (P<0.05) higher than that of control and M. citrifolia waste 15 g/kg. Between antibiotic and M. citrifolia waste did not significantly (P>0.05).differ.  FCR with antibiotic and M. citrifolia waste 5 g/kg was significantly lower than that of control. Between antibiotic and M. citrifolia waste was not significantly different (P<0.05), but FCR with antibiotic and M. citrifolia waste 5 g/kg tent to be lower than that of M. citrifolia waste 10 and 15g/kg. It is concluded that the use of M. citrifolia waste 5 g/kg can substituted antibiotic in layer ration. Key Words: M. Citrifolia Waste, Antibiotic, Egg Production, Layer
The Effects of Zinc-biocomplex and Zinc-methionate supplementation on the ration for lambs ., Supriyati
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 2 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i2.600

Abstract

The effects of zinc-biocomplex and zinc-methionate on the growth of young sheep were studied in this trial. Eighteen young male local sheeps were grouped into 3 groups based on body weight. The treatments are: R1 (Control), R2 (R1 + Zn-biocomplex supplementation), R3 (R1 + Zn-methionate supplementations), with the concentration of Zn was 50 mg kg-1 in daily concentrate.  Zink biocomplex and methionate were prepared in IRIAP laboratory. Feeds given were Elephant grass ad libitum and 200 g h-1 concentrate (CP = 15.40%). The initial body weights were 12.36 to 12.97 kg. Body weights were measured every forthnight and feed consumption was recorded daily. Completely randomized design was applied in this trial. Statistical analysis was carried out by using General Linear Model (GLM). After 3 months feeding trial the average daily gains were 52.65, 71.28 and  71.30 g h-1 (P<0.05) for treatments R1, R2 and R3, respectively; with the mean daily intakes were 583, 562 and 531 g h-1 (P<0.05). The mean feed conversion ratio (FCR) for R1, R2 and R3 were 10.96, 8.44 dan 8.75 (P<0.05). It could be concluded that supplementation of Zn biocomplex and methionate produced in this institute (R1 and R2) gave better performance than control. Forms of Zn (biocomplex and methionate) did not give significant effect on difference (P>0.05) growth. Key Words: Zn- Biocomplex, Zn-Methionate, Supplementation, Growth, Sheep
Responses of young rams to level of hydrolised feather meal subtitution in ration Puastuti, Wisri; Mathius, I-Wayan
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 2 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i2.601

Abstract

Feather meal contains more than 90% protein that most of this protein (70%) are ruminally undegradable, therefore it is a potential source of by pass protein. The study was done to evaluate the response of young rams to hydrolised feather meal (HBA) substitution in ration. Twenty five young rams aged 7-8 months, with average body weight of 21.16 ± 2.47 kg were used in this study. This study was conducted based on ramdomized block design and the rams were grouped into 5 groups based on body weight. The ration consisted of 30% grass and 70% feed supplement on dry matter basis. Feed supplement of the control diet (R0) contained 72% of total digestible nutrient (TDN) and 15% of  total crude protein (CP), whereas R1-R4 were the improved rations that contained 75% of TDN and 18% of CP. HBA was used to substitute feed protein and as by pass protein source. The HBA substitution was done in 5 levels, namely: R0 = grass + feed supplement with 0% HBA; R1 = grass + feed supplement with 1.1% HBA; R2 = grass + feed supplement with 2.2% HBA; R3 = grass + feed supplement with 4.4% HBA and R4 = grass + feed supplement with 8.5% HBA. The study was conducted for 12 weeks. The results showed that the increase of CP in ration and HBA substitution did not affect dry matter (DM), organic matter (OM) consumption, as well as DM, OM and CP digestibility. The substitution of HBA in ration significantly increased CP consumption of ram fed R1, R2, R3 and R4 compared to R0 (143.86; 142.58; 147.46; 134.43 vs 109.98 g/head). The level of NH3-N in rumen fluid was significantly (P<0.01) affected by CP in the ration and HBA substitution. On the other hand total VFA and molar volatile fatty acids were not different except for molar isobutirat. The value of N retention and average daily gain (ADG) were affected (P<0.05) by level of CP and subtitution HBA in ration. The highest ADG value was resulted by rams received R2 diet (133.77 g/head). It was concluded that 2.2% HBA substitution in ration gave the best response on consumption, digestion, rumen fermentation, N retention and ADG. Key Words: Hydrolised Feather Meal, Substitution, Ram
Rumen microbial protein supply as estimated from purine derivative excretion on sheep receiving faba beans (vicia faba) as supplement delivered at different feeding frequencies Natsir, Asmuddin
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 2 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i2.602

Abstract

Rapid and extensive degradation of faba beans (Vicia faba) by ruminal microbes can result in substantial and undesirable N loss from the rumen. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that offering faba beans as a supplement more than once a day to sheep receiving a combination of oaten chaff and lucerne chaff as a basal diet will increase microbial protein supply to the intestines. The experiment was conducted in a Latin square design (4 x 4) using four mature merino sheep. The treatments were: T0 = basal diet ad libitum + nil supplements, T1 = T0 + faba beans (FB) fed once daily, T2 = T0 + FB fed twice daily, T3 = T0 + FB fed 8 times daily. The basal diet was given once per day at 09:00 in the morning while FB were given at the rate of approximately 0.5% of live body weight and delivered according to the treatment protocol. Urinary excretion of purine derivative (PD) was used to estimate microbial protein supply. The results indicated that even though treatment statistically had no effects on total urine output, PD excretion in the urine, PD absorbed, estimated microbial N supply, and the efficiency of rumen microbial protein synthesis, provision of supplement to sheep numerically improved microbial N supply by 92% compared to that of control group. However, there were no differences within the supplemented group. Therefore, it is concluded that feeding faba beans more than once a day was unnecessary. Key Words: Purine Derivatives, Microbial Protein Synthesis, Sheep
Leaf area, chlorophyll content, and relative growth rate of grass on different shading and fertilization Sirait, Juniar
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 2 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i2.603

Abstract

Plant morphology and physiology such as leaf area, total chlorophyll, and chlorophyll a/b ratio were affected by shading and fertilization. An experiment was conducted in Indonesian Research Institute for Animal Production (IRIAP) Ciawi, West Java. The objective of this study was to determine the morphology and physiology adaptation of three short grasses species for grazing namely Paspalum notatum, Brachiaria humidicola, Stenotaphrum secundatum on different shading and fertilization level. The experiment was arranged in split-split plot design. The main plot was shading level (0, 38, 56%); sub-plot was fertilizer dosage (0, 100, and 200 kg N/ha) while sub-sub plot was grass species. The results showed that leaf area were significantly different on different grass species, and there was interaction between shading and species on total leaf area. P. notatum on 38% shading level has the highest total leaf area (240.2 cm2). S. secundatum and P. notatum had a better adaptation in shading area compared to B. humidicola by increasing of total chlorophyll and decreasing of chlorophyll a/b ratio. Relative growth rate (RGR) of P. notatum and S. secundatum were increased by the increasing shading level. On the other hand relative growth rate of B. humidicola was decreased by the increasing  shading level. Leaf area, chlorophyll content, and RGR were not significantly affected by fertilization dosage. Key Words: Shading, Fertilization, Adaptation, Growth, Chlorophyll
Polymorphism of Calpastatin gene and its effect on body weight of local sheeps Sumantri, C; Diyono, R; Farajallah, A; Inounu, I
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 2 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i2.604

Abstract

The objectives of this research were to identify polymorphism of calpastatin gene and to investigate any association of calpastatin genotype on body weight of local sheeps. A total number of DNA samples were collected from 288 heads of local sheeps from 8 populations. Two local sheep samples were medium tail sheeps (MTSs) of a Garut fighting type from Ciomas/Bogor (29) and a Garut meat type from Margawati (29). The remaining six local sheep population were one thin tail sheep (TTS) from Jonggol (36); and five fat tail (FTSs) from Indramayu (43), Madura (43), Sumbawa (26), Rote (36) and Donggala (46) respectively. Genomic DNAs of those blood of local sheeps were extracted by a standard phenol-chloroform protocol and amplified using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. PCR reaction was carried out in a thermocycler (Takara PCR of Thermal Cycler MP4) and PCR products were digested with Msp 1 enzyme restriction using a Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) technique. The PCR-RFLP products were separated at 8% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE).  A silver-staining method then was applied to detect fragments. Genetic variations between local sheep populations were calculated based on frequencies of genotypes and alelles. The association between genotype of calpastatin gene and body weight of local sheeps were calculated by General Linear Model method by SAS version 6.12. A length of 622 base pairs (bp) of the calpastatin gene of the Indonesian local sheeps was successfully amplified by the PCR technique. An MspI restriction enzyme cut the PCR product into two different length fragments, those were 336 bp and 286 bp designated as M allele of the CAST-Msp1; whilst that unsuccessfully cut PCR product resulted one fragment 622 bp designated as N allele of the CAST-Msp1. Locus of the CAST-Msp1 gene in most local sheeps studied was polymorphic, the exception was in the FTS from Rote of which monomorphic. The highest frequency of the M allele was in the fighting Garut sheep from Ciomas (0.29), whilst the lowest was in the FTS from Rote (0.00). However, frequencies of the M allele of FTSs from Sumbawa and Madura were similar (0.04). Further, frequencies of the M allele of local sheeps from Margawati, Jonggol, Indramayu, and Donggala were 0.24, 0.16, 0.13 and 0.12 respectively. The highest frequency of MN genotype was observed in the Garut fighting sheep from Ciomas (0.58), but the lowest was in the FTS from Rote (0.00). The heterosigosity was observed differently  among populations. The highest heterosigosity was also identified in the Garut fighting sheep in Ciomas (0.43), whilst FTSs both in Sumbawa and Madura were for the lowest (0.08). Results of this study showed that there was a definit association betwen calpastatin genotype and body weight of male sheeps from which the MN genotype significantly related to a higher body weight compared to that of the NN genotype. Key Words : Local Sheeps, Calpastatin Gene, Polymorphism, Live Weight
Confirmation test of suspected Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) isolated using PCR F57 Nugroho, Widagdo Sri; Adji, Rahmat Setya; Wahyuni, Aeth
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 2 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i2.605

Abstract

Seropositive and isolate suspected as Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) was detected at dairy cows in West Java. This bacteria causes Johne’s disease (JD) and potentially becomes a new emerging disease for Indonesian dairy cows. The aim of this study was to confirm the suspected local isolate as a MAP distinctively by PCR. Reculture of MAP reference isolate, suspected local isolate done by resuspending bacteria in PBS 0.5% and inoculating it in Herrold’s egg yolk medium with mycobactin J (HEYM) and than inoculating it in 37oC for 16 weeks. The cultures grew in various time, Mycobacterium avium subspecies avium was detected in 3rd week, MAP reference was detected in 7th week, and local isolate was detected in 14th week. The confirmation test was carried out by PCR with primer F57. The PCR F57 result showed that MAP suspected isolate was not a Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis. Key Words: Local Isolate, Mycobacterium avium Subspecies Paratuberulosis, PCR F57
Addition of Ca-soap of Sardinella longiceps oil into the ration: 2. Its effect on physical and chemical characteristics of lamb Sudarman, A; Muttakin, M; Nuraini, H
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 2 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i2.606

Abstract

Lamb contains high saturated fatty acids and cholesterol. Consuming such meat tends to increase atherosclerosis incident. Fat content and composition of meat might be manipulated by giving lemuru fish oil which is rich in HDL and unsaturated fatty acids into sheep diet. Giving lemuru fish oil in the protected form, such as complex calcium-soap is believed to be more beneficial. Twelve sheep were distributed into four groups to receive four experimental diets in studying the influence of calcium soap on meat quality. The sheep were allocated based on Randomized Block Design and at the end of rearing period they were slaughtered. The experimental diets were: R0 = control diet, R1 = R0 + 1.5% calcium soap, R2 = R0 + 3% calcium soap and R3 = R0 + 4.5% calcium soap. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and any significant differences were further tested using contrast orthogonal. The results showed that the treatments significantly (P<0.01) reduced fat content, both of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) of sheep meat. There were no differences in tendernes, cooking loss, water holding capacity (WHC) and pH of meat. It is concluded that the best level of Ca-soap fish oil addition to yield healthy meat is 3%. Key Words: Calcium-Soap, Lamb Meat, Fat, HDL-Cholesterol, LDL-Cholesterol
Rapid identification of Bacillus anthracis by cell wall and capsule components direct fluorescent antibody assay Natalia, Lily; Adji, Rahmat Setya
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 2 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i2.607

Abstract

During the outbreak of anthrax, early diagnosis is critical for effective treatment. Numerous attempts have been made to design antigen based detection tests and to rapidly identify truly anthrax specific antigens for B. anthracis. In Indonesia, standard identification of B. anthracis relies on a combination of time consuming steps including bacterial culture and Ascoli precipitin test, which can take several days to provide a diagnosis. In this study, two component (cell wall and capsule) direct fluorescent antibody assay (DFA) were developed to rapidly identify and to directly detect capsulated B. anthracis. The component used in cell wall DFA (CW-DFA) assay is polysaccharide-peptidoglycan complex, which was prepared from B. anthracis culture by cell lysis, guanidine and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) extraction. The component used in capsule DFA (CAP-DFA) is poly-D-glutamic acid (PGA) which were prepared by extraction of B. anthracis capsule. Component of polysaccharide-peptidoglycan complex and PGA conjugated with hemocyanin were then used as immunogen for immunizing rabbits using Freund’s complete/incomplete adjuvant. The hyperimmune sera were then collected, purified and conjugated to Fluorecent Iso Thiocyanate (FITC). B. anthracis isolates and non B. anthracis isolates were tested by the CW-DFA and CAP-DFA Assays. B. cereus, B. subtilis, other Bacillus sp. and other Gram positive rod bacteria were negative, while capsulated B anthracis gave positive results. The two component (CW DFA and CAP-DFA) assay are specific rapid confirmatory test for capsulated B. anthracis. Key Words: Bacillus anthracis, Cell Wall and Capsule Direct Fluorescent Antibody Assay
Enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin residues in broiler chicken post administration of enrofloxacin Widiastuti, Raphaella
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 2 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i2.608

Abstract

The presence of drug residue in animal product may threat human health such as increasing  resistance to Camplyobacter infection treatment due to the use of enrofloxacin. The objectives of this research was to study the concentration of enrofloxacin (EFX) and ciprofloxacin (CFX) residues distributed in breast, thigh and liver and to determine the elimination rate of such residues in chicken which recieved enrofloxacin orally at 50 mg/kg bw daily for 9 days consecutively started at 23rd day to 31st day of age. Samples of breast muscle, thigh and liver were collected from chicken at ½ to 288 h after the drug administration. The concentration of EFX and CFX in samples were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results showed that the highest residues concentration of EFX and CFX at ½ hr post administration of EFX was: in liver (117.47 ng/g), breast (95.16 ng/gr) and thigh (71.40 ng/g), whereas the order of elimination rate was: thigh (120 hr), liver (168 hr) and breast (240 hr). The results also showed that concentration of CFX was higher than that of EFX. Key Words: Enrofloxacin, Ciprofloxacin, Residues, Broiler Chicken

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