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Ahmadi Riyanto
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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 22 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 13, No 1 (2008)" : 22 Documents clear
Alleviation of oxidative stress, carcass fat and plasma cholesterol in broiler chickens consuming antanan (Centella asiatica) and vitamin C Kusnadi, Engkus
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 1 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i1.588

Abstract

Oxidative stress (a condition where oxidant -free radical- activity dominates the antioxidant activity) in poultry may be caused by heat stress from high environmental temperature. In this research, antanan (Centella asiatica) and vitamin C was utilized as anti heat-stress agents for broilers. One hundred and twenty male broilers of 2 – 6 weeks of age were kept at 31.98 ± 1.940C poultry house temperature during the day and 27.36 ± 1.310C at night. The treatments consist of two kinds: two levels of vitamin C (0 and 500ppm) and three levels of antanan (0, 5 and 10% of diets). The data colected was analized for variance with a factorial in completely randomized design of 2 x 3 (2 levels of vitamin C, 3 levels of antanan) and continued with contrast-orthogonal test when applicable. The results indicated that the treatments of antanan 5% without vitamin C (A5C0), antanan 10% without vitamin C (A10C0), vitamin C 500ppm without antanan (A0C500), combination of A5 and C500 (A5C500), and combination of  A10 and C500 (A10C500) significantly (P<0.05) decreased the level of liver malonaldehida (MDA), carcass lipid and plasma cholesterol. Key Words: Oxidative Stress, Centella Asiatica, Vitamin C
The quality of spotted buffalo epididymal sperm with addition of raffinose as external cryoprotectant ., Yulnawati; ., Herdis; Maheshwari, H; Rizal, M
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 1 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i1.592

Abstract

The aims of this research was to obtain the quality of Spotted buffalo epididymal sperm in different kind of extender in the three stages of cryopreservation (after dilution, post equilibration and post thawing). Spermatozoa was collected with combination of slicing and pressure method into the epididymal tissue in Andromedâextender. Soon after diluted and equilibrated, epididymal spermatozoa was cryopreserved in liquid nitrogen (-196°C).  The result showed that the percentage of motility after thawing in Andromedâ + raffinose 0.4% (47.0 ± 2.4%), was significantly different (P<0.05) from that of control (41.0 ± 2.0%), but there was no significantly different (P>0.05) from that of Andromedâ + raffinose 0.2% (46.0 ± 2.0%). The percentage of live sperm after thawing in control (52.2 ± 2.5%), was the lowest and significantly different (P<0.05) from that of Andromedâ + raffinose 0.2% (59.2 ± 2.6%) and Andromedâ + raffinose 0.4% (58.8 ± 3.1%). Moreover, the percentage of membrane integrity after thawing in control, Andromedâ + raffinose 0.2% and Andromedâ + raffinose 0.4% was 68.0 ± 1.1%; 67.2 ± 1.6% and 67.6 ± 1.2%, respectively. There was no significantly different (P>0.05) in the percentage of membrane integrity from all treatments. In conclusion, the addition of 0.2 and 0.4% raffinose into Andromedâ extender could improve the percentage of motility and viability of post thawing spotted buffalo epididymal spermatozoa. Key Words: Epididymal Sperm, Cryopreservation, Raffinose, Spotted Buffalo
Performances of broiler supplemented with antibiotic and Morinda citrifolia waste as sources of bioactive compounds Bintang, I.A.K; Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 1 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i1.589

Abstract

A study on the use of Zinc bacitracin antibiotic (ZnB) and dried Morinda citrifolia waste as feed additive in broiler ration was conducted. Two hundred and sixteen day old chicks (DOC) was allocated into 4 treatments: control; control + 50 ppm ZnB, and control + M. citrifolia waste at 2 levels (5 and 10 g/kg ration) with 9 replications. Each replicatation consist of 6 birds. The treatments were allocated in a completely randomized design. Variables measured were feed intake, live weight, feed conversion ratio (FCR), percentages of carcass and internal organs (liver, gizard, abdominal fat, and thickness of intestine). The results showed that feed intake of  M. citrifolia waste was significantly (P<0.05) lower than that of control. Live weight and live weight gain of M. citrifolia waste treatments did not significantly different (P>0.05) from that of control. The use of M. citrifolia waste (5 and 10 g/kg) gave significantly lower (P<0.05) live weight than the use of antibiotic. FCR of M. citrifolia waste 5 g/kg ration and antibiotic was not significantly different (P>0.05), but was significantly lower (P<0.05 ) than that of control and M. citrifolia waste 10 g/kg. Carcass and internal organ percentages were not effected by antibiotic and M. citrifolia waste. Liver percentages with M. citrifolia waste 10 g/kg was significantly (P<0.05) higher and abdominal fat was lower (P>0,05) than that of control, control + antibiotic ZnB and M. citrifolia waste 5g/kg. It is concluded that  the supplementation of M. citrifolia waste (5 g/kg) could substitute ZnB to improve feed eficiency in broiler ration. Key Words: M. Citrifolia Waste, Performances, Broiler
Growth characterisics of Garut sheep and its crossbred Inounu, Ismeth; Mauluddin, D; ., Subandriyo
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 1 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i1.590

Abstract

Based on previous study it is agreed that Von Bertalanffy model is the best fitted growth curve model with highest acuracy compared to Gompertz or Logistic models. For that reason in this study Von Bertalanffy model was used to study growth characterisics of Garut sheep and its crossbred. Relative superiority of crossbred sheep compared to Garut sheep in mature size parameter (A) based on Von Bertalanffy model were respectively: M. charolain X Garut = 19.26%; Hair sheep X Garut = 8.08% and MG X HG or HG  X MG = 4.22%. While relative superiority of crossbreds compared to Garut in rate of maturing (k) were respectively: MG = -4.91%; HG = -1.34% dan MHG/HMG = 6.05%. Based on its relative superiority mature size parameter (A) and rate of maturing (k) MHG sheep had prospect for more developed due to its performance in term of high mature body weight, faster in reaching standard of slaughter body weight (35 kg) at 440 days, and it is considere as more eficient in biological and economicaly. Key words: Growth Characteristics, Garut Sheep and Crossbreds, Relative Superiority
Effect of Priangan ram seminal plasma on viability of Peranakan Etawah buck spermatozoa preserved at 3–5oC Rizal, Muhammad; ., Herdis; Surachman, Maman; Mesang-Nalley, W. Marlene
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 1 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i1.591

Abstract

In processing of buck semen, seminal plasma is a problem because it contains a phospholipase A enzime produced by the Cowper gland. If this enzime interacts with egg yolk, it causes semen coagulation, and consequently death of spermatozoa. The purpose of this research was to examine the effect of Priangan ram seminal plasma on viability of Peranakan Etawah (PE) buck spermatozoa preserved at 3–5oC. Semen was collected using artificial vagina once a week. Fresh semen was divided into three tubes then centrifuged at 3,000 RPM for 30 min. Supernatant of the first tube was mixed again with Pasteur pipette (treatment A or control). Supernatant of the second tube was removed (treatment B or without seminal plasma). Supernatant of the third tube was removed and changed with Priangan ram seminal plasma in the same volume (treatment C). Semen was diluted with Tris extender containing 20% egg yolk and stored in refrigerator at 3–5oC. Quality of diluted-semen including percentages of motile spermatozoa (MS), live spermatozoa (LS), and intact plasma membrane (IPM) was evaluated every day during storage at 3–5oC for three days. Results of this study showed that mean volume, colour, consistency, pH, mass activity, spermatozoa concentration, MS, LS, spermatozoa abnormal, and IPM of PE buck fresh semen, respectively was 0.68 ml, cream, thick, 7, ++/+++, 4,148.57 million cell/ml, 70%, 83.89%, 7.12% and 84%. At day-4 of storage, percentages of MS, LS, and IPM for treatment C (40, 52.2 and 51.6%) was significantly (P<0.05) higher than that of: treatment B (31, 44.8 and 45.2%) and treatment A (11, 15.6 and 14.8%). In conclusion, seminal plasma of Priangan ram could maintain the quality of PE buck semen preserved at 3–5oC for three days, and it prevent semen from coagulation. Key Words: Seminal Plasma, Priangan Ram, Spermatozoa Viability, PE Buck
The viability of fresh and extended semen of stallion with different sperm concentration in Dimitropoulos-modified extender ., Yudi; Arifiantini, I; Purwantara, B; Yusuf, T.L
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 1 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i1.593

Abstract

The objective of the experiment was to study the motility and viability of spermatozoa of fresh semen, and the quality of extended semen with different sperm concentration in Dimitropoulos-modified extender. Semen was collected using artificial vagina from three 4-8 year old stallions (different breed). Semen characteristics and quality was evaluated macro- and microscopically. For longevity evaluation, semen was stored at room and chilled temperature, and was evaluated for motility and viability every 3 h. Prior extension, semen was centrifugated at 3000 rpm for 20 minutes. The condensed sperm was re-suspended in Dimitropoulos (DV) supplemented with 50 mM fructose with the concentration of 200, 100 and 50 x 106 spz/mL. All samples were stored at room and chilled temperature, and was evaluated for motility and viability every 3 h and 12 h for room and chilled temperature. Results of the experiments indicated that fresh semen characteristics was fairly good. For longevity evaluation, semen with motility of 48.33 and 10.42% was observed at 3 h and 12 h after the onset of storage. The extended-semen with 50 x 106 spz/mL showed significantly higher in term of motility and viability (P<.05) than that with 200 x 106 spz/mL, but for that of 100 x 106 spz/mL. It is recommended that sperm concentration should be 50 x 106 spz/ml for a long period storage with reasonable good quality. Key words: Stallion, Semen, Sperm Concentration, Dimitropoulos
Cloning and Clone Analysis of GRA1 Gene from Local Isolate Toxoplasma gondii Tachyzoite Subekti, Didik T; Artama, W.T; Sulistyaningsih, E; Poerwanto, S.H; Sari, Y; Bagaskoro, F
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 1 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i1.594

Abstract

The GRA1 gene of Toxoplasma gondii encoding protein called GRA1 protein. GRA1 protein known to be immunogenic and essentialy involved in modification of parasitophorus vacoule which has role in immune evasion and virulency of organism. The local isolate of T. gondii is successfuly isolated and known as highly pathogenic isolate similarly as its RH strain. Unfortunately, the homology sequence of GRA1 gene between those isolate still unknown. The purpose of the research are to clone the GRA1 gene and to analyze the homology from pathogenic T. gondii isolate and RH strain. Tachyzoite of T. gondii was grown in mice peritoneum by intraperitoneal injection. Then, total mRNA was isolated and purified. cDNA was synthesized from mRNA and then amplified using F1 dan R1 primers to get clone of GRA1 from local isolate. Homology analysis was perform using several bioinformatic softwares. The result showed that cDNA of GRA1 from local isolate has 84% homologs with RH strain of T.gondii. However, when subsequently editing performed to parts of suspected non coding sequence of cDNA GRA1 to get CDS of GRA1, the homology was increase to 100% compare to CDS of GRA1 of RH strain. Key words: GRA1, Toxoplasma gondii, Clonning, Expression
Clostridial necrotic enteritis in chicken associated with growth rate depression Priadi, Adin; Natalia, Lily
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 1 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i1.595

Abstract

Clostridium perfringens (C. perfringens) is a normal inhabitant of the intestinal tract of chickens as well as a potential pathogen causing necrotic enteritis. C. perfringens only causes necrotic enteritis when it transforms from non-toxin producing type to toxin producing type. The alpha toxin, (phospholipase C) is believed to be a key to the occurrence of Clostridial necrotic enteritis (CNE). The best known predisposing factor is mucosal damage, caused by coccidiosis that damages the intestinal lining, making the gut susceptible to infections including C. perfringens. The purpose of this study was to observe the chicken performance in experimental CNE and field cases of CNE. Diagnosis of CNE were made by latex agglutination test, isolation and identification of the agent. Pathological and histopathological changes were also observed. Experimentally, NE could be reproduced when Eimeria sp and C. perfringens spores are inoculated in chicken. Signs of an NE are wet litter and diarrhea, and an increase in mortality is not often obvious. The depression of growth rate and feed efficiency of chicken become noticeable by week 5 because of damage to the intestine and the subsequent reduction in digestion and absorption of food. Subclinical form of CNE was also frequently found in the field, leading to significant decreases in performance. Chicken gut samples examinations revealed that subclinical form of CNE causes damage to the intestinal mucosa caused by C. perfringens leads to decreased digestion and absorption, increased feed conversion ratio and reduced weight gain. Dual infection with C. perfringens and Eimeria sp. was frequently found in field. The results of these studies provide evidence for C. perfringens as a causative bacteria for growth depression. Key Words: Clostridial Necrotic Enteritis, Chicken, Growth Depression
Seroprevalence of Q fever in sheep and goat in West Java area Setiyono, Agus; Handharyani, Ekowati; Mahatmi, Hapsari
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 1 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i1.596

Abstract

Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii, a species of bacteria that is distributed globally. Ruminant especially sheep and goats may play an important role in the transmission of the disease to human. The research of seroprevalence of Q fever in sheep and goats was carried out from August 2006 to March 2007 in West Java area. A total of 138 sera were collected; 69 sera from sheep and 69 sera from goats. The indirect immunoflourescent antibody test was used to determine the seroprevalence of Q fever. The seropositive based on the dilution of serum starting from 1 : 16. Seropositive were observed in 22 samples (31.88%) of sheep and 14 samples (20.28%) of goats. The highest titer of 1 : 128 was observed in 3 pregnant sheep. The results of the present study suggested that Q fever was endemic in West Java area. Key Words: Q Fever, Prevalence, Indirect Immunoflourescent Antibody Test
The efficacy of Tiamulin hydrogen fumarat 10% in the feed to prevent chronic respiratory disease in broiler chickens ., Soeripto
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 1 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i1.597

Abstract

Up to presence chronic respiratory disease (CRD) of chickens is still causing economic losses against poultry industries in the world. The purpose of this trial is to determine the efficacy and safety of a compatible dose of Tiamulin hydrogen fumarat 10% in combination with monensin for the control of CRD in broilers. A number of 630 day-old broilers were divided into 3 groups and each group was divided again into 7 subgroups of 30 equally sexed birds. Each subgroup was placed randomly in 2 chicken houses. Up to 3 weeks of age, chickens in Group I were fed with starter feed (SP1) containing 100 ppm monensin only without other treatment and used as control. Chickens in Group II were fed with SP1 feed containing 30 ppm Tiamulin hydrogen fumarat (3 – 6 mg/ kg BW) and 110 ppm amoxicillin, this feed is called SP1+, whereas chickens in Group III were administered with SP1 feed and treated with enrofloxacin liquid formulation 10% with a dose 0.5ml/L in drinking water for the first 5 days of life. Started from 22nd day until the end of the experiment at 32 days of age, all chickens in Groups I, II and III were fed with SP2 finisher feed containing neither monensin nor Tiamulin hydrogen fumarat. The results of the experiment showed that no statistical difference in bodyweight and feed conversions among the groups at 32 days of age but feed conversion in Group II was statistically different compared to those in Groups I and III at week 2. No clinical signs of toxic interaction of monensin combined with Tiamulin were observed. Lesions of airsacculitis and ascites occurred only in dead chickens of Groups I and III but not in chickens of Group II. The incidence of pneumonia in Group I occurred in all dead birds which is statistically different to Group II that had one lesion of pneumonia. Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Escherichia coli organisms were able to be isolated from the chickens that had pneumonia and ascites in Groups I and III only. The results of the experiment showed that combination of 30ppm Tiamulin hydrogen fumarat + 110 ppm amoxicillin is effective for preventing CRD in broilers and save if it is combined with 100 ppm monensin. Key Words: Tiamulin Hydrogen Fumarat, Chronic Respiratory Disease, Broilers

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