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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 20 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 12, No 3 (2007)" : 20 Documents clear
Carcass percentage and quality of broilers given a ration containing probiotics and prebiotics Daud, Muhammad; Piliang, Wiranda G; Kompiang, I. Putu
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 3 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i3.481

Abstract

Probiotics is a feed additive in the form of life microorganisms that balance microorganism population in the digestive tract. While prebiotics is a feed substance which is not digested, and selectively improves growth and activity of useful microbes in large intestine. The objectives of this research were to study the carcass percentage and carcass quality of broilers given a ration containing probiotics and prebiotics. Four hundred eighty day-old chicks of broiler Arbor Acres strain were divided into four dietary treatments and three replications (40 birds / replicate). Ration used was consisted of: R1 = basal ration + 0.01% antibiotics (Zinc bacitracin), R2 = basal ration + 0.2% probiotics (Bacillus spp), R3 = basal ration + 0.2% probiotics + 0.5% prebiotics and R4 = basal ration + 0.5% prebiotics (katuk leaves). The variables observed were: carcass percentage, fat content in the abdomen, liver and carcass, cholesterol content in the liver, carcass and blood serum. The results showed that the carcass quality of broiler received probiotics and prebiotics either independently or the combination was significantly (P<0.05) different. The fat content of liver and thigh, and breast cholesterol of R3 was significantly (P<0.05) lower than that of the control (R1). It is concluded that combination of probiotics and prebiotics were able to decrease the carcass fat and cholesterol content at six week of age. Key Words: Probiotics, Prebiotics, Carcass, Broilers
Heat stress effect and given of hexane extract jaloh bark (Salix tetrasperma Roxb) to cortisol level, triiodothyronine and hematology profile of broiler chickens ., Sugito; Manalu, W; Astuti, D.A; Handharyani, E; ., Chairul
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 3 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i3.482

Abstract

Plasma concentration of cortisol and hematological profile on broiler chickens can be used as heat stress indicators. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of administration of n-hexane extract of jaloh bark (EHJ) on heat-stressed broiler chicken. Thirty broilers, aged 20 days (strain Cobb), were randomly divided into 5 groups. The first group was external control (tCP) i.e. chickens without heat stress and without EHJ administration. The second group was internal control (CP) representing chickens given heat stress without EHJ administration. The third, fourth, and  fifth groups were chickens given heat stress and EHJ administration at doses 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg BW, respectively symbolized as CP+EHJ5, CP+EHJ10, and CP+EHJ20. The experimental broilers were exposed to heat stress in constant temperature of 33 ± 1oC for 4 hours daily for 5 and 10 days. The EHJ was given 1 hour before temperature in the cage was raised and was given in daily basis.  The level of cortisol in feces were measured from feces collected 1-2 hours before  treatment, 3-4 hours after heat stress exposure, and 2-3 hours after heat stress termination. This research indicated that heat stress at temperature 33 ± 1oC during 2 and 4 hours increased cortisol  excretion in feces (P<0.05) and increased ratio H : L (P<0.10). The EHJ at dose of 10 mg/kg BW relatively gave more protection from heat stress impact on broilers. Key Words: Cortisol, Triiodothyronine, Heat Stress, Salix, Hematology
Purine derivatives excretion and estimation of microbial protein supply on sheep receiving different protein suplements Natsir, Asmuddin
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 3 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i3.483

Abstract

The urinary excretion of purine derivative (PD), which consists of allantoin, uric acid, xanthine and hypoxanthine, was used to estimate Microbial Nitrogen (MN) supply on sheep given oaten hay as basal diet supplemented either with faba beans (faba) or barley fortified with urea (barley-urea). Three growing wethers, with average body weight of 43 ± 2.29 kg, were randomly assigned to one of three experimental diets, i.e. oaten hay without supplement (C), diet C + barley-urea (CB), and diet C + faba (CF), according to latin square design (3 x 3). Results of the experiment indicated that PD excretion for C was lower (P = 0.07) than that of CB and CF (2.84 vs 6.08, 7.67 mmol/d). Absorbed PD and estimation of MN supply for C was less (P = 0.07) than those of CB and CF, namely 1.26 vs 6.64, 8.80 mmol/d and 0.91 vs 4.8, 6.30 g N/d respectively. However, the efficiency of MN synthesis was similar, whether the calculation was based on digestible organic matter fermented in the rumen, DOMR (g MN/kg DOMR, P = 0.20) or based on N intake (g MN/g N intake, P = 0.40). In conclusion, supplementation of oaten hay with different protein supplements may improve the estimation of microbial N supply in the growing sheep but both supplements gave similar results on the estimation of MN supply. Key Words: Purine Derivative, Microbial Protein, Protein Supplement, Sheep
Protein efficiency of hydrolyzed feather meal substitution in sheep ration Puastuti, Wisri; Mathius, I Wayan
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 3 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i3.484

Abstract

The use of protein ration in ruminant is affected by the characteristic of protein. The present study was carried out to evaluate the efficiency of protein of hydrolyzed feather meal (HBA) in ration for growing sheep. Twenty-five young rams of 7-8 months old with an average body weight of 21.16 ± 2.47 kg were used in this study. This study was conducted for 12 weeks based on randomized block design (5x5). The control treatment (R0) contained 72% of total digestible nutrient (TDN) and 15% total crude protein (CP), whereas R1-R4 treatments were fed on improved ration containing 75% TDN and 18% CP where HBA was used to substitute feed protein and as by pass protein source. The HBA substitution was carried out in 5 levels, namely: R0 = grass + concentrate with 0% HBA; R1 = grass + concentrate with 1.1% HBA; R2 = grass + concentrate with 2.2% HBA; R3 = grass + concentrate with 4.4% HBA and R4 = grass + concentrate with 8.5% The result showed that an increase of CP in ration and HBA substitution might increase CP consumption (P<0.01) but CP digestibility were not affected. HBA substitution increased (P<0.01) the average daily gain (ADG) from 90.91 g/head (R0) to 125.33 g/head (R1-R4) or increased 37.86%, but it did not affect the efficiency of protein ration. The respons of HBA substitution levels in ration (x) to ADG followed the equation, ADG = 1.641x2 + 15.778x + 99.372 (r2 = 72.37%). It is concluded that 8.5% HBA substitution in ration can substitute 100% soybean meal, and 2.2% HBA substitution in ration gives the best efficiency to support daily gain. Key Words: Protein, Feather Meal, Substitution, Sheep
Pineapple waste-silages as basal feed for growing Boer X Kacang cross goats Ginting, Simon P; Krisnan, Rantan; Simanihuruk, Kiston
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 3 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i3.485

Abstract

The study was aimed: 1) to evaluate the effects of using different additives on the quality of pineapple waste-silage (SLN), and 2) to investigate the responses of goats fed with PAS as a basal feed. Pineapple processing wastes include skins and the pulp left after cannery wastes are pressed to extract the juice. Six additive treatments were used in the processing of pressed pineapple wastes, namely 1) urea (5% DM), 2) Urea (2% DM) and cassava meal (3% DM), 3) molasses (5% DM), 4) urea (2.5% DM) and molasses (2.5% DM), 5) fermented-juice lactic acid bacteria (5% DM), and 6) without additives. Fermentation periode were set at 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21 days. The best SLN obtained from those treatments was then used in feeding trials. Twenty male Boer x Kacang crosses with an initial body weight averaging 13.2 ± 1.9 kg were used in this experiment. The animals were allocated to one of the following feed treatments, in DM: A) Grasses (75%) + SLN (25%), B) SLN (75%) + Concentrates (25%), C) SLN (50%) +Concentrate (50%), and D) SLN (25%) + Concentrates (75%). Using molasses as additive material at 5% and 15 days of fermentation period gave the best chemical and physical characteristics of the SLN. Its crude fiber content decreased and it showed the lowest pH (4.7) The silage showed temperature at 280C, and its taste was sour, and no fungi contamination. The DM and OM intakes and DM, OM and N digestibility were not different (P>0.05) between the animals fed 75% Grass/25% CON and 75% SLN/25% CON. When the proportion of concentrates in the rations was increased, the feed intake and digestibility were increase significantly (P<0.05). ADG (71.3 vs 68.8 g) and feed efficiency (11.2 vs 13.4) was similar between the 75% Grass/25% CON and 75% SLN 25% CON groups. ADG increased significantly (P<0.05) when the proportion of concentrates in ration was increased to 50% (82.6 g) or to 75% (89.1 g). N retention was positive in all treatments, and it was increased significantly (P<0.05) as the proportion of concentrates in ration increased. It is concluded that pineapple wastes could be preserved to silages using molasses as additive material. Pineapple waste silage could be used as roughage to substitute grass in ration. When fed with the pineapple waste silage the responses of goats will increase as the proportion of concentrates in the ration increased. Key Words: Pineapple Wastes, Silages, Goats
Fermentation kinetics (in vitro) of Leucaena leucocephala, Gliricidia sepium and Calliandra callothyrsus leaves (3) the pattern of gas production, organic matter degradation, pH, NH3 and VFA concentration; estimated CH4 and microbial biomass production Widiawati, Y; Winugroho, M; Teleni, E; Thalib, A
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 3 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i3.486

Abstract

In high protein feeds, plant proteins may be shielded from degradation in the rumen by lignification of the cell wall or because of the present of plant secondary compounds e.g. tannin, which is present in most of the leguminous trees/shrubs. Thus it might have an effect on organic matter degradation and the pattern of other end product of rumen microbial fermentation (VFA, NH3, microbial cell, CH4 and total gas). The in vitro method was used to determine the organic matter degradation and the pattern of rumen fermentation end product of high protein feeds, namely Leucaena leucocephala, Gliricida sepium and Calliandra calothyrsus. The results shows that Gliricidia has the highest amount of OM degraded (505 mg); microbial cell and NH3 produced (2676 g and 1.91 mmol/100 mL) than followed by Leucaena (423 mg; 2656 g; 1.61 mmol/100 mL) and Calliandra (340 mg; 2644 g; 1.61 mmol/100mL), but Gliricidia produced the lowest amount of gas total and CH4 (0.192 mL and 0.07 mole per mg OM deraded) then Leucaena (0.249 mL and 0.097 mole per mg OM deraded) and Callliandra (0.196 mL and 0.126 mole per mg OM deraded). In conclusion, Gliricidia is more efficient in term of using the dietary energy for the animals’ production compared to the Leucaena and Calliandra. Key Words: Legumes Tree, Organic Matter, NH3, VFA, CH4, Microbial Cell
Estimation of genetic parameters for body weight of Alabio and Mojosari ducks at starter period Prasetyo, L. Hardi; Susanti, Triana
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 3 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i3.487

Abstract

A selection program is one of many important tools in livestock breeding in improving the quality of breeding stock. The choice of an effective selection method requires some information on the value of genetic parameters for some economically important traits, such as heritabilities and genetic correlation coefiicients. This experiment used 25 drakes and 100 ducks of each Alabio and Mojosari ducks, mated at random 1 drake to 4 ducks. A number of ducklings were obtained from each mating in each population, and their body weights were observed from hatching to 8 weeks old. Results showed that the heritability estimation for body weight to 8 weeks old were generally low either in Alabio or in Mojosari, ranging between 0.061 to 0.227. The highest heritability estimation was obtained for 6-week body weight 0.151 for Alabio and 0.227 for Mojosari ducks. The estimates of genetic correlation among body weights varied widely but generally high. It is concluded that 6-week body weight can be considered as a selection criterion depending on the selection objective in the local Indonesian ducks. Key Words: Heritability, Genetic Correlation, Ducks
Water balance of goats in Jeneponto - South Sulawesi under sunlight exposure and water restriction Rahardja, Djoni Prawira
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 3 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i3.488

Abstract

Water balance of 5 does of Kacang goat of Jeneponto was studied under the condition of sunlight exposure and water restriction. The study was conducted in dry season with 4 consecutive treatments of 10 d with 4-5 d of adjustment period between two consecutive treatments: (1) indoor and unrestricted water; (2) indoor and restricted water; (3) 10 h outdoor–and unrestricted water; (4) 10 h outdoor – restricted water. The maximum air temperature of outdoor was 39.3OC, and it was 30OC in the indoor environment. In all treatments, the animals were placed in the individual crates. The plasma volume of the goats was higher under sunlight exposure, but it decreased by water restriction, while hematocrite value indicated a reverse responses. Sunlight exposure did not significantly decrease the intake and digestion of organic matter, but water restriction affected significantly and this effect was higher under sunlight exposre. The proportions of water loss through every avenue were maintained relatively constant either under water restriction or sunlight exposure in which the respration rate increased significantly. The findings suggest that sunlight exposure with unrestricted water resulted in a positive water balance without a significant change in organic matter intake and utilization. Water restriction resulted in a negative water balance, reducing organic matter intake and utilization. As the adaptive mechanisms, the goat appeared to be able to withstand in the harsh environment of Jeneponto by expanding plasma volume, increasing body temperature and respiration rate. Key Words: Goat, Water Balance, Sunlight Exposure, Water Restriction, Digestion
Estimation of breeding value and genetic trend of Garut sheep and its crossbred Inounu, Ismeth; ., Subandriyo; Handiwirawan, E; Nafiu, L.O
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 3 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i3.489

Abstract

Crossing of Garut (GG) sheep with St. Croix sheep (HH) and Moulton Charollais (MM) resulting HG sheep (♂HH X ♀GG) and MG sheep (♂MM X ♀GG) was done by Indonesian Research Institute for Animal Production. The work continued by crossing MG and HG sheep to obtain HMG (♂HG X ♀MG) and MHG (♂MG X ♀HG) sheep. The study was continued by selection program based on phenotypic performance. Estimation of breeding value and genetic trends were done in order to study the effectiveness of selection program and to study the genetic progress of each breed. The breeding value was estimated by Best Linear Unbiased Prediction (BLUP) method using Variance Component Estimation (VCE4) software to calculate variance component and using Prediction and Estimation (PEST) to calculate Breeding Value. Genetic variations of composite sheep were generally higher than Garut sheep, represented by higher estimated heritability value. Genetic correlation of body weight at diffrent age is high, that makes selection at one age could also increase body weight at any level of age. In general of this population shows positive genetic trend, but fluctuated from year to year. Composite breed tend to have higher estimated breeding value than Garut sheep. Selection method that was practiced in this population showed in line with selection method using breeding value criteria. Key Words: Breeding Value, Genetic, BLUP, Garut Sheep, St. Croix, Moulton Charollais
Estimation of direct and maternal effects for weaning and yearling weight in Bali cattle Praharani, Lisa
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 3 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i3.490

Abstract

Growth trait is a function of its inherent ability for growth, milk production and mothering ability of its dam. A study was conducted to investigate the effects of maternal on the genetic evaluation of Bali cattle. There were 8.320 calves used to analyze genetik parameters affecting W205 and W365. A connectedness program was used to evaluate genetik linkages between contemporary groups (CG). Data were analyzed to observe non-genetik factors using PROC MIXED (SAS). Single and multiple trait analyses were done including CG, sex of calf and dam age as fixed effects. Variance components were computed by the ASREML package using animal models BLUP with matrix inverse of relationship. A sequential analysis was performed by including additional random effect to evaluate the inclusion of maternal effects, which were compared using likelihood-ratio tests (LRT). Estimates of direct and maternal effects of single-trait and multiple-traits were different. Heritability for W205-D, W365-D, W205-M, W365-M were 0.31; 0.48; 0.08 and 0.01, respectively. Negatif correlation between direct and maternal effects for both W205-DM and W365-DM were quite moderate. Although the estimates of maternal effects in Bali cattle were low; the inclusion of maternal effects has to be considered due to moderate correlation between direct and maternal effects in order to obtain accurate genetic variances. Key Words: Maternal Effects, Heritability, Live Weights, Bali Cattle

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