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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 24 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 12, No 1 (2007)" : 24 Documents clear
Performances and phylogenic relationships among local sheep in Indonesia by morphological analysis Sumantri, C; Einstiana, A; Salamena, J.F; Inounu, I
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 1 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i1.563

Abstract

The morphological discriminant and canonical analysis were carried out to estimate the phylogenic relationship and determine the discriminant variables between Indonesian local sheep of thin tail sheep from Jonggol (Bogor) and Garut and fat tail sheep from Indramayu (originated from East Java), Donggala, Madura, Kisar, Rote and Sumbawa. The number of sheep used  was totally 818 heads collected from 8 populations, were Jonggol (185), Garut (74), Indramayu (100), Donggala (60), Madura (86) Kisar (231), Rote (52), and Sumbawa (30). Discriminant analysis used for body weight and body measurements were body length, wither height, chest width, chest depth, chest circumference, skull length, skull width, skull height, tail lenght, tail width, ear length and ear width. SAS package program was used to analyze the data. The results from analysis variant showed that the body weight and body measurenment of Garut sheep almost the same with sheep from Indramayu and significantly higher (P<0,05) compared to another breeds. Whereas, Kisar and Rote have body weight and body measurenment significantly lower (P<0,05) compared to another breeds. The results from Mahalanobis distance (phenogram tree) and canonical analyses showed that breeds were divided into five groups, the first group is Garut, the second is thin-tail sheep which existed in Jonggol, the third was fat-tailed sheep which existed in Kisar, Rote, and Sumbawa, the fourth is fat-tail sheep which existed in Donggala, and the fiveth was fat-tailed sheep which existed in Indramayu and Madura. The groups of sheep between Kisar and Rote had the smallest genetic distance value equal to 1,623 and groups between Donggala and Garut had the biggest genetic distance value equal to 7,994. The highest similarity between individual inside the group was obtained from Sumbawa (100%) and the lowest similarity was from Rote (72,41%). The results from canonical analyses showed that tail lenght, ear width, ear lenght, skull lenght, body lenght, and tail width were the most discriminant variables to determine the diferences between breeds. Key Words: Sheep, Genetic Distance, Analysis Discriminant and Cannonica
Supplementation of Morinda citrifolia waste as bioactive compound on the performances of broiler Bintang, I.A.K; Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 1 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i1.556

Abstract

A study on the use of dried Morinda citrifolia waste as feed additive in broiler ration was conducted. One hundred day old chicks (doc) were allocated into 4 levels (control; 0.0; 1.2; 2.4 and 4.8 g/kg feed) of M. citrifolia waste with 5 replication. Each replication had 5 birds. The treatments were allocated in a completely randomized design. Variables measured were: feed intake, live weight, feed conversion ratio (FCR), percentages of carcass and internal organs ( liver. gizard, abdominal fat, and thickness of intestine). The results showed that M citrifolia waste supply did not significantly (P>0.05) affect all variables measured, but feed intake of those fed with high levels (4,8 g/kg) of M. citrifolia waste was significantly (P<0.05) lower than those fed with 1.2 g/kg. FCR was significantly (P<0.05 ) lower as compared to the control; 1.2 and 2.4 g/kg. It is concluded that the best treatment was the supplementation of M. citrifolia waste of 4.8 g/kg, this treatment improved feed efficiency by 5% as compared to the control. Key Words: M. citrifolia Waste, Performances, Broiler
Effect of humid acid on performance of broiler chicken Kompiang, I.P; ., Supriyati
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 1 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i1.557

Abstract

An experiment had been carried out to study the effect of supplementation of humic acid via drinking water as natural feed additive on the performance of broiler chickens, in order to find the replacement of antibiotic, which recently known had negative effect on the consumen. Three hundred and twenty of day old broilers were divided into 4 treatment groups: (I) control (without humic acid); (II), (III) and (IV) with 100, 200 and 300 mg l-1 humic acid in the drinking water, respectively. Each group consisted of 4 replications with 20 birds each replication. The drinking water contained 2 mg l-1 probiotic. The birds were kept in litter system; feed and water were given ad libitum for 5 weeks. The parameter measured were body weight gain, feed convertion ratio (FCR) and percentage of carcass. The treatments had a significant effect on both body weight gain (P<0.05) and FCR (P<0.05). Body weight gain of control (I) 1839 g head-1 5 weeks-1, with FCR 1.66 were poorer than that of the group received humic acid: 1882 g head-1 5 weeks-1, 1.66; 1881 g head-1 5 weeks-1, 1.64; and 1874 g head-1 5 weeks-1, 1.59 for treatments II, III and IV, respectively. There were no significant different (P>0.05) between treatment II, III and IV neither on body weight gain nor FCR values.The treatments had no significant effect on carcass yield, 66.28 ± 1.78; 67.06 ± 3.11; 67.63 ± 2.06 and 67.68 ± 2.21% for treatments I, II, III and IV, respectively. It is concluded that humic acid has a potential effect as natural feed additive, which could improve growth and feed efficiency without affecting carcass yield. Key Words: Humic Acid, Natural Feed Additive, Broiler
Effect of restricted feeding on productivity of Mojosari X Alabio cross-bred layer ducks (MA): Growing phase to point at lay Ketaren, P.P; Prasetyo, L.H
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 1 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i1.558

Abstract

Feed efficiency of layer ducks is low since feed consumption is considerably higher than egg production. The experiment has been conducted to evaluate performances and age at first laying of MA crossbred duck from 1-20 weeks old on restricted feeding. Three experimental diets tested were: (1) 70% ad libitum = 70% A, (2) 85% ad libitum = 85% A and (3) 100% ad libitum = 100% A. Feed consumption, live weight gain (PBB), feed conversion ratio (FCR), mortality rate and age at first laying were recorded. Live weight gain of ducks on 70 and 85%A were significantly (P<0.05) lower than 100% A for both at 12 weeks old. Live weight gain of duck at 16 weeks old fed 85% A was similar to the ducks fed 100% A. On the other hand, FCR of duck at 16 weeks old on 70 and 85% A were significantly (P<0.05) better than ducks fed 100% A diet. Age at first laying was delayed 9 days on duck fed 85% A and 21 days on duck fed 70% A diet. However, average weight of first laid egg was not affected by the treatments. Mortality increased on duck fed 70% A. This study indicated that feeding MA duck at rate of 85% of ad libitum was sufficient to support normal growth and reproductive development. Key Words: MA Crossbred Duck, Restricted Feeding, Growth, Age at First Laying
Palm oil by-product as an alternative feedstuff in Central Kalimantan: 2. The effect of feeding palm oil mill effluent on cholesterol, fatty acid and vitamin A of broilers Widjaja, Ermin; Utomo, Bambang Ngaji
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 1 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i1.559

Abstract

Solid heavy paste, a byproduct of crude palm oil processing, is found in an excessive amount in Central Kalimantan. It is estimated that 400 tons of this material were produced per day by crude palm oil (CPO) factories in this region. This material contains 12.63-17.41% crude protein, 9.98-25.79% crude fiber, 7.12-15.15% crude fat, 3217-3454 kcal/kg (gross energy) and 1.5% CPO. Considering its composition, this material can be used as an ingridient in broiler’s diet. This study was conducted on broiler chickens of Hubbard strain in Kapuas district. The objectives of the experiment were to study the cholesterol, fatty acid and vitamin A retained in meat and liver of broilers as a result of feeding ration containing solid heavy paste. This experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design. The treatments were levels of solid in the diet, i.e., 0.0, 12.5, 25 and 37.5%. Four hundred broilers were divided into 4 treatmen groups with 5 replications, consisted of 20 chickens in each replication. Data was analyzed based on statistical and descriptive analyses. The results of this experiment indicated that 25% solid in the diet decreased the total fat and cholesterol in the meat and liver, but increased polyunsaturated fatty acid contained in meat. The highest contain of vitamin A in meat and liver was found in the group that received diet containing 12.5% solid. Key Words: Solid, Broiler Chickens, Cholesterol, Fatty Acid, Vitamin A
Heterosis of the crossbred between Tegal and Mojosari ducks under sub-optimal condition Prasetyo, L. Hardi
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 1 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i1.560

Abstract

Crossbreeding between two different strains or breeds is often done in a livestock production system to take advantage of the heterosis (hybrid vigour) which may resulted from the crossing. The level of heterosis largely depend on the genetic distance betweeen the two parental groups, and is also affected by the environmental condition in which the heterosis would be more significant under less optimal condition. The aim was to evaluate the heterosis level of the crosses between Tegal and Mojosari ducks under stressful environment of low nutritional content (14% protein) in the diet. The experiment was conducted in the animal facilities of the Indonesian Research Institute for Animal production, using 40 Tegal (TT) ducks, 44 Mojosari ducks (MM), 46 crossbreds between Tegal drakes and Mojosari ducks (TM), and 42 crossbreds between Mojosari drakes and Tegal ducks (MT). Results showed that heterosis was not significant for the average age at first laying (AFL) and weight of first egg (WFE), in which AFL of TT (171.8 d) was not significantly different from that of MT (163.4 d) and both were shorter than the AFL of MM (182.3 d) or that of TM (182.8 d). Heterosis also did not exist on egg production to 68 weeks old (EP-68), in which the EP-68 of TT was 141.3 eggs and that of MT was 122.6 eggs, and both were lower than EP-68 of MM (156.8 eggs)  or of TM (154.0 eggs). For egg qualities, heterosis also did not show any significant level and difference between genotypes only existed for the Haugh Unit values. It seems that even under stressful environment heterosis did not exist among crosses between Tegal and Mojosari ducks, and therefore it can be concluded that the crosses between these two breeds will not produce any beneficial effects in a production system under any condition. Key Words: Heterosis, Ducks, Low Protein Diet
Methane production and energy partition in sheep fed timothy silage- or hay-based diets Santoso, B; Mwenya, B; Sar, C; Takahashi, J
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 1 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i1.561

Abstract

Methane is produced as a result of anaerobic fermentation of the soluble and structural carbohydrates by methanogens in the rumen of ruminant animals. Removal of methane from rumen represents a loss of approximately 7.22% of gross energy intake.  Four ruminally fistulated Cheviot wethers were used in a crossover design to determine methane production and energy partition in sheep fed timothy silage- or hay-based diets. The experimental diets consisted of either timothy silage or timothy hay and a commercial concentrate (85:15, on DM basis). Variables measured were nutrients digestibility, energy balance and methane production. Apparent digestibilities of DM, OM, CP, NDF, ADF, cellulose and hemicellulose were significantly higher (P<0.05) on sheep fed silage-based diet than those fed hay-based diet. Sheep fed silage-based diet had greater (P<0.01) urinary energy loss, methane and heat production, but lower (P<0.05) fecal energy loss. Methane production, either expressed as g kg-1 dry matter intake or g day-1 was markedly lower (P<0.05) in hay-based diet as compared to silage-based diet. There was a strong relationship between methane production (g day-1) and NDF digested (g day-1) (R2 = 88.4%, P<0.001). Methane production expressed as g kg-1 NDF digested in silage-based diet was higher (P<0.05) than in hay-based diet (66.44 vs 62.70). These results indicate that methane release by sheep increased with increasing NDF digested. Key Words : Methane, Silage, Hay, Neutral detergent fiber, Sheep
Effects of testosterone hormone and ages on carcass characteristics of Kacang doe Rudiono, Didik
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 1 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i1.562

Abstract

Forty Kacang doe (average initial BW, 10.2 kg) were used in 4x2 factorial arrangement to determine carcass characteristics. Dose of the testosterone as first factor were assigned to four levels, i.e.: control (T0), 1 dose of testosterone propionate (T1),  2 doses of TP (T2), and 3 doses of TP (T3). The age of animals as the second factor, i.e.: 7-8 months of age (U1) and  9-12 months of age (U2), referred to chevon method. The treatment combinations were replicated 5 times, respectively, so that there were 40 heads of doe. Animals were injected with 0.77 mg of TP/kg BW/d weekly for first dose and  the goats were fed for 90 days.  The diet were assigned to met or exceed 50 g ADG. The variables included slaughter weight, carcass weight, pelt weight, and Kidney Pelvic Heart (KPH) fat weight. There were significant interaction (P<0.01), except on KPH weight. The best carcass characteristics were significantly resulted from injection of 49 mg TP head-1 week-1 treated on 9 kg of Kacang doe. Key Words: Testosterone, Age, Carcass Characteristic, Kacang Doe
Use of pregnant mare’s sera gonadotropin (PMSG) in media in vitro maturation of cow oocytes Udin, Zaituni; ., Jaswandi; Afriani, Tinda; E, Leonardo
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 1 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i1.564

Abstract

It is known that hormone addition in media helps in vitro maturation of oocyte. This research was aimmed to determine the effect of PMSG in media to maturation rate and nucleous developvement of cow oocyte. Ovaries were obtainned from local slaughterhouse. The media used for in vitro maturation of oocyte was TCM- 199 and the treatment was 3 levels of PMSG: 0, 10 and 20 mg/ml. Result of this research showed that the dose of PMSG in maturation media was significantly affected (P<0.05)  nucleolus development of oocytes and maturation rate. The average of germinal vesicle (GV) stage in 3 levels of PMSG 0, 10 and 20 mg/ml were 38.33; 12.64 and 9.64%, respectivelly. There was no germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) found in 3 levels of PMSG addition. The nucleous development of metaphase–I (M-I) were 7.64; 20.2 and 22.00%, but the average of maturation rate (M-II)  was 16.32; 48.10 and 35.34% for 3 levels of PMSG: 0, 10 and 20 mg/ml, respectivelly. It is concluded that 10 mg/ml PMSG in media of in vitro maturation resuls in the highest maturation rate of cow oocyte. Key Words: Oocyte, Maturation, In vitro, Hormone, PMSG
Trenbolone residue in tissues and urine of Onggole male calves treated with acetate trenbolone implant Widiastuti, R; Firmansyah, R; ., Indraningsih
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 12, No 1 (2007)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v12i1.565

Abstract

Trenbolone acetate (TBA) is a hormone being permitted to be used as growth promoters for livestocks in several meat-exporting countries. The presence of trenbolone residu in animal products might affect human health. The purpose of this study was to determine the distribution of trenbolone residue (TBA dan 17 ß-trenbolone) in tissues and urine of Onggole male calves. The implantation of 200 mg TBA as Finaplix-H® was done subcutaneously on the back side of the medial part of ear. Urine were collected periodically until 21 days post implantation. The animals were terminated on the day 21st post implantation. Urine, meat and organs were analysed for trenbolone residues. The results showed that TBA residues were detected in tissues of inner and surrounding areas of the implantation sites and liver with an average concentration of 11 ng/g, 2,1 ng/g and 1,6 ng/g respectively. The 17 ß-trenbolone residue was only detected in tissue of inner area of the implantation site at the average concentration of 8,2 ng/g. Meanwhile, none of the residues were detected in urine. Key Words: Residue, Trenbolone, Implantation

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