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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 22 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 11, No 3 (2006)" : 22 Documents clear
Nutritive values of solid heavy phase in replacing corn in broilers diet Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T; Bintang, I.A.K; Pasaribu, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 3 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i3.522

Abstract

Indonesia is still importing corn for feed. Utilization of nonconventional feedstuffs may reduce this importation. One of them is solid heavy phase (SHP), i.e., a solid substance gained after filtration of liquid waste of crude palm oil factory with a potential production approximately 2 million ton/year. This research was carried out to study the utilization of SHP to replace corn in broiler’s diet. The SHP was dried and analysed for its nutrient compositions. The metabolisable energy was measured by using hens. Feeding trial was then conducted by replacing corn with SHP in various levels, i.e., 0 (Control), 10, 20, 30, and 40%. All diets were formulated to be isocalori dan isonitrogen. Five hundred broilers DOC were used in this trial and fed for 5 weeks. The performances of the birds were obsereved as parameters. Results showed that the ash, minerals crude fibre and fat contents of the SHP were higher than the corn. The crude protein of the  SHP was similar to that of corn, but some amino acids content of the SHP were lower than the corn. The AME and TME values of SHP were 3271 and 3465 cal/g, respectively. Results of feeding trial showed that body weight of the birds were less as the level of SHP to replace corn increased in the diet. The FCR also showed impared as the levels of SHP increased in the diet. However, replacement of 10% corn with SHP did not significantly affect the body weight and FCR as compared with the control. Feed consumptions of the birds were not significantly affected by replacing corn with SHP. Carcass yield and relative weights of some internal organs were not significantly different between dietary treatments. It is concluded that the solid heavy phase could be used to replace 10% corn in broiler’s diet. Key Words: Solid Heavy Phase, Palm Oil By Products, Broilers
Effects of inclusion in ration sago with methionine and lysine supplementation on broiler performance and its abdominal fat content ., Suryana
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 3 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i3.523

Abstract

An experiment has been conducted to study effects of sago inclusion in ration with methionine and lysine supplementation on broiler performance and its abdominal fat content. One hundred and eighty male broiler chicken of strain ISB-707 at the age of 7 days were randomly allocated to nine groups of experimental rations which were replicated four times (five bird each) in a completely randomized design. The treatments were; R0 (control), R1 (15.0% fresh sago), R2 (15.0% fresh sago + 0.1% methionine and 0.3% lysine), R3 (30.0% fresh sago), R4 (30.0% fresh sago + 0.1% methionine and 0.3% lysine), R5 (15.0% steamed sago), R6 (15.0% steamed sago + 0.1% methionine and 0.3% lysine), R7 (30.0% steamed sago) and R8 (30.0% steamed sago + 0.1% methionine and 0.3% lysine). The parameters recorded in this experiment were: feed intake, protein intake, energy intake, methionine intake, lysine intake, weight gain, carcass weight, carcass percentage and abdominal fat. Variables differences were examined for significances using Duncan test. Results showed that 15% steamed sago with supplementation of 0.1% methionine and 0.3% lysine significantly (P<0.05) increased the feed intake, weight gain, carcass percentage and carcass weight. Methionine and lysine supplementations decreased feed conversion ratio and abdominal fat content of broilers. Key Words: Fresh and Steamed Sago, Methionine, Lysine, Broilers
Utilization off fermented copra meal with A. niger in broiler diet Haryati, T; Togatorop, M.H; Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T; ., Murtiyeni
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 3 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i3.524

Abstract

Research of nutritional evaluation of fermented copra meal and its application in broiler has been conducted. In the first experiment the crude protein and fiber contents were determined in the fermented copra meal using A. niger BPT, NRRL 337 and ES1. Further, 384 of Indian River DOC were used for in vivo experiment. Completed Randomized Design was used with 8 treatments: Control without and with 10% addition of copra meal, 3 levels of fermented copra meal addition with Aspergillus niger BPT or A. niger NRRL 337 (10, 15, 20%). Every treatment was repeated 8 time with 6 birds each. Variables measured were body weight, consumption, feed conversion, mortalities and carcass analyses. Diets were formulated in isocalori and isoprotein. The research was conducted in 6 weeks. The results showed that fermentation process increased the copra meal protein content from 22.3 to 36.1; 35.6 and 38.6% respectively for fermentation with A. niger BPT, NRRL 337 and ES1, decreased the crude fiber from 19.5 to 13.0; 18.9 and 8.28%. Results during 3 weeks trial show that the treatment significantly affected on broiler performance (P<0.05). Fermented copra meal was better than non fermented copra meal. There was no significantly different (P>0.05) in broiler performance at 6 weeks trial evaluation. The best conversion was in diet with 10% fermented copra meal with A. niger BPT and NRRL 337. The feed conversion of diets with 10% of each fermented products were better than control or diet without copra meal. The feed conversion of 15% fermented copra meal addition was not significantly different to control. Utilization of fermented copra meal with A. niger BPT or NRRL 337 should not more than 15%. Key Words: Copra Meal, Bioprocess, Broiler
Immunomodulatory effect of tea mistletoe (Scurrula oortiana) extract on chicken embryos Murtini, S; Murwanti, R; Satrija, F; Hadnharyani, E
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 3 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i3.525

Abstract

Tea mistletoe is one of medicinal herb which believed has an anticancer activity, it’s due to the capability of immunostimulator. The following research was carried out to determine the immunomodulatory effect of tea mistletoe (Scurrula oortiana) extract on chicken embryos. Twenty White Leghorn Specific Pathogen Free (SPF) 10 days old embryonated chicken eggs were divided into four groups of 5 eggs. The first group served as control and they were inoculated with aquabidestilate sterile. The second, third and fourth group was inoculated with 0.1 mg, 0.2 mg, and 0.4 mg S. oortiana extract/egg respectively. S. oortiana extract was inoculated via allantoic cavity. All experimental eggs were incubated at 37oC until day 21 and incubation was terminated before the embryos hatched. The embryos and the lymphoid organs (bursa of Fabricius, thymus and spleen) were weighed. Immunomodulatory effect of tea mistletoe extract was measured by counting the percentage of bursa of Fabricius active lymphoid follicle and the area of thymus medulla. The results showed tea mislestoe extract at the dose of 0.1mg, 0.2 mg and 0.4 mg have immunomodulatory effect on chicken embryos indicated by the increase of percentage of active lymphoid follicle of bursa Fabricius i.e. 68.8, 71.8 and 57.8% and increase area of thymus medulla i.e. 24.9 – 39.3% respectively compared to control group i.e. 22.6% of active lymphoid follicle of bursa Fabricius and 17.6% of thymus medulla area. It is concluded that S. oortiana extract at the dose of 0.1mg, 0.2 mg and 0.4 mg have immunomodulatory effect on chicken embryos. Key Words: Scurrula oortiana, Tea Mistletoe, Embryonated Chicken Egg, Immunomodulator
Dry matter productivity of the dwarf and normal elephantgrasses as affected by the planting density and cutting frequency Mukhtar, Muhammad
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 3 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i3.526

Abstract

The effects of planting density and cutting frequency on dry matter productivity were compared in two years following establishment among dwarf varieties (early-heading, DE and late-heading, DL) and normal varieties, Wruk wona (Wr) and Merkeron (Me), in the southern part of Kyushu, Japan. The planting densities examined for Wr, DE and DL were high (16 plants/m2, 25 cm × 25 cm of spacing), medium (8 plants/m2, 50 × 25 cm), and low (4 plants/m2, 50 cm × 50 cm), while for Me was only medium. The cutting frequency was three times with 60-day intervals in 2002 and two times with 90-day intervals in 2003. Irrespective of the planting densities, dwarf varieties were higher in tiller number, leaf area index and percentage of leaf blade (PLB) than those of normal varieties, but lower in plant height and total dry matter weight at all planting densities in both years. With the increase in planting density, annual herbage dry matter yield (HDMY) increased. The annual HDMY was higher in 2002 (cut twice) than that in 2003 (cut three times), and the difference in annual HDMY between the dwarf and normal varieties decreased by planting at high density and cut twice. Even though, the dry matter productivity was higher in the normal varieties than in the dwarf varieties at any planting density and cutting frequency, DL tended to show a stable productivity with high PLB irrespective of planting density and cutting frequency. Key Words: Cutting Frequency, Dry Matter Productivity, Dwarf Elephantgrass, Normal Elephantgrass and Planting Density
Estimation of genetic distance of rabbit by morphometric analysis Brahmantiyo, B; Martojo, H; Monsjoer, S.S; Raharjo, Y.C
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 3 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i3.527

Abstract

The observation on morphological body conformation of English Spot (ES), Flemish Giant (FG), New Zealand White (NZWm), and Rex (Rexm) from Magelang, Central Java, and New Zealand White (NZWb), Rex (Rexb), Satin (Satin) and RS (RS) from Balitnak-Ciawi, were carried out to determine estimation of Mahalanobis genetic distance.  This research was held in Magelang (Central Java) and Balitnak-Ciawi (West Java), 237 heads of Rabbits were used. Eleven different body parts were measured, those were head (length and width), ear (length and width), chest (girth, depth, and width), humerus length, radius-ulna length, tibia length and body length. General Linear Models were used in this observation (SAS package program). Simple discriminant analyses as further analyses were done for head (length and width), chest (girth, depth, and width), humerus length, radius-ulna length, tibia length and body length. ES, FG and NZWm rabbits had morphological size bigger than others. Mahalanobis genetic distance showed that NZWm and NZWb, Rexm and Rexb were had differences with genetic distances of 5.89139 and 6.75571 respectively. Rabbits from Magelang and from Balitnak were different on morphometric with mahalanobis distance of that region ranges were 4.89426 to 6.96749. Results from canonical analysis showed that the most discriminant variables were obtained by chest girth, chest width and humerus length on first canonical and head length on second cannonical. Key Words: Rabbit, Genetic Distance, Morphometric
Status of ram spermatozoa DNA after freeze-drying process Saili, Takdir; Prasetyaningtyas, wahono Esthi; Setiadi, Mohamad Agus; AgungPriyono, Srihadi; Boediono, Arief
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 3 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i3.528

Abstract

The process of freeze drying caused detrimental effect on plasma membrane and acrosome of the spermatozoa, even it potentially could alter the chromatin and DNA integrities. On the other hand, DNA integrity is essential for spermatozoa to participate in pronucleus formation during fertilization event. Therefore the evaluation of DNA integrity should be carried out to study the effect of freeze drying process. EDTA, EGTA, and PBS were used as dilution media of spermatozoa prior to freeze drying process to protect the DNA. Toluidine blue staining and comet assay methods were used to evaluate the alteration on chromatin and DNA integrities of spermatozoa, respectively. The results revealed that the highest compacted chromatin after 6 months storage of freeze-dried spermatozoa were observed from EGTA-3 (98%) and EGTA-1 (97%) treatments that had significant differences compared to all PBS treatments (90-92%), but not for fresh spermatozoa (100%). Whereas, the highest compacted DNA integrity of freeze-dried spermatozoa were observed from EGTA-2 (92%) and EGTA-3 (92%) but had no significant differences compared to other treatments including fresh spermatozoa (97%). These results demonstrate that EDTA and EGTA tend to be able to protect chromatin and DNA integrities of ram spermatozoa during freeze-drying and storage compared to PBS. Key Words: Freeze-Drying, Spermatozoa, DNA, Toluidine Blue, Comet Assay
Effect of Ascaridia galli infection on histopathologic description, size of small intestines villi surface and body weight change in starters Zalizar, L; F, Satrija; R, Tiuria; Astuti, D.A
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 3 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i3.529

Abstract

Nematode Ascaridia galli is an important parasitic disease in poultry and is responsible for considerable economic losses in retarded growth and lowered egg production. The effects of A. galli infection based on histopathologic description, size of small intestines villi surface and body weight change in starters was investigated. One hundred and thirty five day old chicks (DOC) were divided into three groups for three levels of infection dose rate (0,800 and 8000 infective eggs) with 3 replications of 45 DOC each. Infections were carried out every week respectively from week 2th until week 5th. Results showed that the infection of A. galli caused degeneration and necroses in villi ephitelial cells and crypts of small intestine and infiltration of leucocytes. In the heavy infection group some epithelial cells were replaced by fibrocytes. A.  galli infection decreased daily body weight gain of starter lower (5.5% in light and 13.4% in heavy dosage infection) compared to that of the non infected group. After six weeks of heavy infection the size of small intestine villi surface was decreasing to 20.0%, while the daily body weight gain was decreasing to 12.3% compared to that of the non infection group. Key words: Ascaridia galli, Starter, Productivity
Diagnosis of Fasciola gigantica infection in cattle using capture-ELISA assay for detecting antigen in faeces Estuningsih, Sarwitri Endah
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 3 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i3.530

Abstract

Capture-ELISA assay is a diagnosis for antigen detection in the serum or faeces using polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies. The purpose of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of capture-ELISA assay using polyclonal antibody for diagnosing Fasciola gigantica infection in cattle by detecting antigen in the faeces. In this study, faecal samples and livers were collected from 141 cattle slaughtered in the abattoir in Jakarta. From each animal, liver was processed for liver flukes count and the corresponding faecal sample was analysed for coproantigen. The result of capture-ELISA assay for antigen detection showed that from 85 cattle infected with Fasciola gigantica, 83 had OD > 0.52 (range from 0.52-1.39) and 2 cattle had OD < 0.52 (range from 0.17-0.51). The sensitivity and specificity of the assay were 97.6% and 92.8% respectively. The assay also able to detect 50 ng/ml of antigen in faecal supernatant. It suggests that this assay will have the advantage over the other methods on its ability to detect the active infection. Collection of faeces, rather than serum, will allow a more cost-effective and adaptable method. Key Words: Fasciola gigantica, Diagnosis, Capture-ELISA, Antigen
Sequence variability of the β Tubulin isotype-1 genes in benzimidazole resistant strains of Haemonchus contortus, a nematode parasite of sheep Haryuningtyas, Dyah; Artama, wayan T; Asmara, Widya
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 3 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i3.531

Abstract

Resistance to benzimidazole at a population of gastrointestinal nematode, especially Haemonchus contortus is a widespread problem. Therefore, anthelmintic will not effective anymore. Benzimidazole resistance in nematode has been shown to be heritable and defined as an increase in frequency of individual worms able to drug tolerate. In Indonesia resistance to anthelmintic albendazole has been reported on sheep in district of Bogor, Kuningan, Kendal and province of Yogyakarta. Molecular mechanism of resistance to benzimidazole on nematode and fungi related to single gene which code ß tubulin. The aim of this research is to determine a genetics variability of isotype-1 ß tubulin genes from Indonesian strain of H. contortus which resistant to benzimidazole. Sequencing were carried out at a 520 bp fragment of the isotipe-1 ß tubulin gene of six H. contortus resistant strain from four sheep from SPTD Trijaya farm, district of Kuningan, West Java; UPTD Pelayanan Kesehatan Hewan farm, district of Bantul, Yogyakarta respectively. One H. contortus susceptible strains as a control come from farmer from Cicurug, district of Sukabumi, West Java. Results indicated that there are genetics variability of  fragment isotype-1 ß tubulin genes from H. contortus from UPTD Pelayanan Kesehatan Hewan farm, Bantul, Yogyakarta (H1, H2, and C2). There are no genetics variability in the fragment gene of H. contortus resistant strain from SPTD Trijaya farm, Kuningan, West Java (Kn1, Kn2 and K1). Genetic variability occur between 2 isolate from different location. Key Words: Haemonchus contortus, Benzimidazole, Isotype 1 β-tubulin Gene, Sequencing

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