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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 22 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 11, No 2 (2006)" : 22 Documents clear
The effectiveness of Aloe vera barbadensis bioactives on laying hens on commercial farmers Pasaribu, Tiurma; Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 2 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i2.511

Abstract

A field trial was conducted to study the effectiveness of dry gel Aloe vera (DG) as a feed additive for laying hens in commercial farms. The trial was consisted of two treatments, one was control, commonly used farmer ration containing antibiotic of zinc bacitracin at 0.5 g/kg and the second feed containing DG equal to 1.0 g/kg. Every treatment had two replicates with 504 Loghman laying hens. The hen day production (% HD), egg weight, feed consumption, feed conversion ratio (FCR), egg quality comprising yolk colour, albumin and yolk weights, egg shell eight and thikness, and mortality were observed for 24 weeks. The results showed that feed consumption, % HD, egg weight, FCR, yolk colour, albumin weight, yolk weight, egg shell weight, and egg shell thickness were not significantly different (P>0.05) between the control and DG treatment, except for the Haugh unit (HU). Thus, it can be concluded that Aloe vera bioactives has the same effectiveness as antibiotic as a feed additive at the level of commercial farms. Key Words: Laying Hens, Egg Production, Egg Quality, Aloe vera barbadensis Bioactives, Antibiotic
Effect of ß-xilanase and ß-glucanace supplementations on the performances of broiler chickens Bintang, I.A.K; Sinurat, A.P; Ketaren, P.P
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 2 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i2.512

Abstract

A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of enzyme supplementation on the performances of broiler chickens. One hundred and twenty five day old chicks (DOC) were allocated into five dietary treatment with 5 replicates. Every replicate had 5 DOC. The treatments were: control, control + 0.02% ß-xylanase, control + ß glucanase at three levels (0.05; 0.10 and 0.20%). The treatments were carried out in a randomized block design. Parameter measured were: feed intake, live weight gain and feed conversion ratio (FCR) at 3 and 5 weeks old, while carcass, internal organ, abdominal fat, thickness of intestine, and mortality were observed only at 5 weeks old. The results showed that enzyme supplementation did not significantly (P>0.05) affect feed intake and live weight gain of chicks at 3 weeks old, but the FCR of enzyme supplementation was significantly (P<0.05) better as compared with the control. FCR of birds fed with ß-glucanase tended to be better than the ß-xylanase supplementation (P>0.05). The enzyme addition did not significantly (P>0.05) affect all parameters recorded at 5 weeks old chickens. It is concluded that the best treatment for chicks at 3 weeks old was 0.05% ß-glucanace supplementation. This treatment improved 7.55% FCR as compared to the control. Key Word: Enzyme, Performances, Broiler
The effect of passion fruit hulls level (Passiflora edulis Sims f. edulis Deg) as Kacang goat feed component: I. Intake digestibility and nitrogen retention Simanihuruk, Kiston; Wiryawan, Komang G; Ginting, Simon P
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 2 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i2.513

Abstract

To study the effect of utilization of passion fruit hulls (Passiflora edulis Sims f. edulis Deg) as feed component on consumption, digestion and nitrogen retention in kacang goats, a trial was conducted using 20 young kacang goats (average initial body weight 23.73±2.16 kg). The experiment was arranged in completely randomized design consisting of 4 diets and 5 replications. Animal were randomly allocated into 4 diets (0, 15, 30, 45% of passion fruit hulls). Each diet contains 2550 Kcal/kg metabolism energy and 14% crude protein. The feeding level was set at 3.8% of body weight based on dry matter. The results of the experiment showed that average dry matter intake, nutrient digestibility, and nitrogen retention were not affected by level of passion fruit hulls (P>0.05), although nutrient digestibility and nitrogen retention tended to decrease with the increasing level of passion fruit hulls. It was concluded that passion fruit hulls can be used till 45% level in the diet. Key Words: Passion Fruit, Consumption, Digestibility, Nitrogen Retention, Kacang Goat
Banana stem juice protected soy bean meal as feed suplement to sheep: In sacco and in vivo Puastuti, W; Mathius, I-W; Yulistiani, D
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 2 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i2.514

Abstract

Protein with low resistant of rumen degradability must be protected, which part of its protein could reach post ruminal and able to supply amino acids for ruminant. The experiment was conducted to obtain the best ratio of soy bean meal with banana stem juice as feed supplement protecting protein. Rumen degradability using rumen fistulated sheep were evaluated in saccous at incubation times of 0, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 hours.  The best ratio in the in sacco experiment was used for further in vivo experiment. Fifteen growing lambs with average live weight of 18.6 ± 2.2 kg were grouped according to body weight in trial with a simple randomized design. Three treated rations were R0 = control diet with 0% protected soy bean meal, R50 = diet with 50% protected soy bean meal, and R100 = diet with 100% protected soy bean meal. All diets were iso nitrogen and iso energy (CP 18% and TDN 75%). Diet consisted approximately 30% king grass and 70% concentrate. The experimental diets were offered for 12 weeks. The result from in sacco experiment showed that the best ratio between soybean meal and banana stem juice was 2:1 w/v (R2). This mixture had the highest rumen undegradable dry matter and protein. Result from in vivo experiment showed that the intake and digestibility of dry matters, the intake and digestibility of crude protein. The intake and digestibilities of dry matter intakes and digestibilitie of crude protein, pH value, NH3-N, total bacteria, purin and total VFA in rumen fluid were not affected by feed supplement. The same average body weight at the beginning of study resulted same body weight at the end of study. The ADG of R50 and R100 (138.1 and 122.2 g) were respectively not different with the control, RO (120.9g). It was concluded that soy bean meal and banana stem juice 2:1 w/v was the best ratio, but as feed supplement with high resistant rumen degradable protein can not produce higher growth rate than the control group. Key Words: Soy Bean Meal, Banana Stem Juice, Protected Protein, Degradation
The effect of estrus and pregnant sheep serum on in vitro ovine embryo production Mattimena, J
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 2 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i2.515

Abstract

The aim of this research is to observe the influence of estrus sheep serum (ESS) and pregnant sheep serum (PSS) on in vitrous ovine embryo development. The research was carried out in Animal Reproduction Laboratory, Faculty of Animal Husbandry, Padjadjaran university. Oocyte and ovary of local sheep were collected from slaughter house. Maturation, fertilization and embryo culture media were supplemented with 10, 15 and 20% ESS or PSS respectively. Results show that supplementation of 20% ESS had significantly (P<0.05) better maturation rate than those of 10-20% PSS (79.98% vs 58.89-68.97%). However, increasing ESS into 15-20% did not affect the maturation rate (71.86-74.98%). Therefore, 10% estrus sheep serum (ESS) can be used as an alternative serum in the ovine maturation media. The supplementation of ESS or PSS did not significantly increas the fertilization rate and in vitrous ovine embryo development, however, it was suggested to add 10% pregnant sheep serum (PSS) at in vitrous ovine embryo culture. Key Words: Serum, Sheep, Maturation, Fertilization, Embryo
Role of various sugars in improving frozen semen quality of Garut ram Rizal, Muhammad; ., Herdis; Boediono, Arief; Aku, Achmad Selamet; ., Yulnawati
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 2 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i2.516

Abstract

Ram spermatozoa are sensitive to extreme changes in temperature during the freeze-thawed process. The present study was conducted to examine the effects of addition of various sugars in Tris extender on sperm cryosurvival of Garut ram. Semen was collected using an artificial vagina from three mature rams once a week. Immediately after initial evaluation, semen was divided into five parts and diluted with Tris extender (control), Tris extender + 0.4% dextrose, Tris extender + 0.4% raffinose, Tris extender + 0.4% trehalose, and Tris extender + 0.4% sucrose, respectively. Semen was loaded in to 0.25 ml mini straw with the concentration of 200 million or 800 million motile spermatozoa per ml. Semen was equilibrated at 5oC for three hours, then frozen and stored in liquid nitrogen for seven days. Quality of processed-semen including percentages of motile spermatozoa (MS), live spermatozoa (LS), intact acrosome cap (IAC), and intact plasma membrane (IPM) were evaluated after dilution, equilibration, and thawing, respectively. Data were analyzed using completely randomized design with five treatments and six replicates. Means were compared significant difference test at 0.05 significant level. Results of this research showed that there was no significantly difference (P>0.05) between treatments for all sperm quality parameters after dilution and equilibration. Mean percentages of post thawing MS, LS, IAC, and IPM for dextrose (54.00; 68.00; 66.60, and 57.83%), raffinose (50.00; 64.33; 61.80, and 61.75%), trehalose (50.83; 65.67; 61.40 and 57.75%), and sucrose (49.00; 66.80; 58.50 and 58.50%) were significantly (P<0.05) higher than control (40.83; 52.67; 54.60, and 49.40%) respectively. In conclusion, addition of 0.4% dextrose, raffinose, trehalose or sucrose in Tris extender are effective in improving frozen semen quality of Garut ram. Key Words: Sugars, Tris extender, Frozen Semen Quality, Garut Ram
The use of CR1aa for ovine in vitro embryo production ., Yulnawati; Setiadi, M.A; Boediono, A
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 2 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i2.517

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of CR1aa as a simple medium for maturation, fertilization and culture of ovine embryo in vitro. Oocytes were collected by slicing method in Phosphate Buffer Saline (PBS) supplemented with 5% Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS) and 100 IU/ml penicillin streptomycin. Oocytes were matured in Tissue Culture Medium (TCM)-199 as control or CR1aa as treatment medium. Both maturation medium were supplemented with 10% Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS), 10 IU/ml Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH), 10 IU/ml Luteinizing Hormone (LH), 1 μg/ml Estradiol and 100 IU/ml penicillin-streptomycin. Oocytes were incubated in 5% CO2 incubator, 38˚C for 24 h. Matured oocytes were fertilized in BO or CR1aa medium, supplemented with 2.5 mM caffeine benzoate and 20 mg /ml heparin. After 18 h in vitro fertilization, oocytes were cultured in TCM-199 or CR1aa medium, both supplemented with 5% FBS, 5 mg/ml insulin and 100 IU/ml penicillin streptomycin. Results showed that the highest maturation rate was found in TCM-199 medium (73.27%) and significantly different (P<0.05) from CR1aa (52.88%). Fertilization rate in CR1aa medium (67.59%) was higher (P<0.05) than in BO medium (52.94%). Furthermore, there was no significant difference (P>0.05) between cleavage rate of ovine embryos in TCM-199 and CR1aa medium (39.45% vs 50.94%). In conclusion, optimum result on ovine in vitro embryo production can be achieved from a combination of TCM-199 as maturation medium and CR1aa as fertilization and culture medium. Key Words: CR1aa, TCM-199, Embryo, Ovine
A study of inoculation route and dosage levels on embryonated chicken eggs as media for testing tea mistlestoe (Scurrula oortiana) extract activity Murtini, Sri; Murwarni, R; Satrija, F; Malole, M.B.M
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 2 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i2.518

Abstract

Tea mistlestoe extract (Scurrula oortiana) has cytotoxic activity which is potential to be used in preventing viral induced-chicken tumor. The following study was designed to evaluate the effects of different inoculation routes, dosage levels, and strains of embryonated chicken eggs as media for testing the tea mistlestoe extract (Scurrula oortiana) antiviral activity. Proper inoculation route was examined by inoculation of the extract at dose level of 0,2 mg/egg into embryonated layer eggs via allantoic cavity, chorio-allantoic membrane, and yolk sac. Effect of dose level of tea mistlestoe extract on embryo development was examined in groups of embryonated broiler eggs inoculated with the extract at 0.02, 0.2, 2, 20, or 200 mg/egg. Inoculation of tea mistlestoe extract into allantoic cavity was the safest procedure as indicated by the absence of embryos mortality, and faster embryo growth compared to those of chorio-allantoic membrane and yolk sac-inoculated eggs. The extract induced different growth effects when inoculated into embryonated layer or broiler eggs. Administration of the extract at dose levels between 0,02–200 mg/egg reduced significantly the weight of broiler embryoes, but not the relative weights of liver, heart and spleen. Administration of similar dosage in layer embryoes did not cause any significant difference in the embryoes weight. This study suggests that the study of antiviral activity of tea mistlestoe extract in embryonated chicken eggs should be carried out on embryonated eggs of layer breeds and the extract should be inoculated via allantoic cavity. Key Words: Scurrula oortiana, Embryonated Chicken Eggs, Enti Viral Activity
Vaccination of goats with fresh extract from Sarcoptes scabiei confers partial protective immunity Tarigan, Simson
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 2 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i2.519

Abstract

Protective immunity has been known to develop in animals infested with Sarcoptes scabiei. However, our previous attempt to induce protective immunity in goats by vaccination with fractions of soluble or insoluble mite proteins had been unsuccessful. Degradation or denaturation of protective antigens occurred during vaccine preparation was suggested as one possible cause of the failure. In this study, mite proteins that used to immunise animals were prepared rapidly in order to prevent protein degradation or denaturation. About 150 mg of freshly isolated mites were rapidly homogenised, centrifuged then separated into supernatant and pellet fractions. Twenty-eight goats were allocated equally into 4 groups. Group-1 goats were vaccinated with the whole mite homogenate supernatant, group 2 with the supernatant, group 3 with the pellet, and group 4 with PBS (unvaccinated control). Vaccination was conducted three times, with three-week intervals between vaccinations, using Quil A as adjuvant, and each vaccination using fresh mite homogenates. One week after the last vaccination, all animals were challenged with approximately 2000 live mites. The severity of lesions, scored from 0 (no lesions) to 5 (>75% infested auricle affected), were determined one day, two days, then every week after challenge. Mite challenge caused the development of skin lesions in all animals. No significant differences between vaccinated and unvaccinated animals were observed in regards to the severity of lesions. However, the mite densities in vaccinated animals were significantly lower (P=0.015) than those in unvaccinated control. This study indicates that the protective antigens of S. scabiei are liable to degradation or denaturation and exist in a very low concentration or have vary low antigenicity. This implies isolation of the protective antigens by the conventional approach, fracionation of the whole mite proteins and testing each fractions in vaccination trials, is seemingly inappropriate for S. scabiei. Key Words: Sarcoptes scabiei, Vaccination, Fresh Homogenate, Partial Immunity
The activities of antioxidant enzymes extracted from Fasciola gigantica infecting Thin Tailed and Merino sheep Wiedosari, Ening
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 2 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i2.520

Abstract

Previous studies shown that Indonesian Thin Tailed (ITT) sheep are more resistant to Fasciola gigantica infection than Merino sheep. This difference could be mediated by intrinsic defense enzymes of the parasite. Certain enzymes are known to be crucial in parasite survival against host-derived immune responses. We measured some of them to identify if any comparative differences between the enzyme activities of the parasites from the two hosts (ITT & Merino sheep) could account for the mechanisms of parasite resistance to killing by the Merino host and susceptibility to killing by the ITT host. Parasites were extracted from the liver of infected ITT and Merino sheep and superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) enzyme activities were assayed. SOD and GST levels were found to be higher in parasites isolated from Merino than those of ITT sheep (P<0.05), CAT activity was not detected in any of the parasites. There was significantly higher eosinophils (P<0,05) in the ITT sheep peritoneal cells. These results suggested that SOD dan GST are important molecules in determining susceptibility in Fasciola-infected Merino sheep and resistance in Fasciola-infected ITT sheep. Key Words: Fasciola Gigantica, Indonesian Thin Tailed Sheep, Merino Sheep, Superoxide Dismutase (SOD), Glutathione S-Transferase (GST)

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