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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 20 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 11, No 1 (2006)" : 20 Documents clear
Oil palm by product as an alternative feedstuff in Central Kalimantan: 1. The effect of feeding palm oil mill effluent on broiler’s performance Widjaja, Ermin; Piliang, Wiranda G; Rahayu, Iman; Utomo, Bambang Ngaji
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 1 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i1.501

Abstract

Palm oil mill effluent, a by product of crude palm oil processing, is found in an exessive amount in Central Kalimantan. It is estimated that 400 ton of this material is produced per day by crude palm oil (CPO) factory in this region. This material contains 12.63-17.41% crude protein, 9.98-25.79% crude fiber, 7.12-15.15% crude fat and 3217-3454 kcal/kg (gross energy). An experiment was conducted on broiler chickens of Hubbard strain in Kapuas District. The objectives of the experiment was to study the performance of broilers fed solid in the diet. The experiment was arranged in a completely randomized design. The treatments were levels of solid in the diet, i.e., 0.0, 12.5, 25.0 and 37.5%. Four hundred broilers were devided into 4 treatment groups with 5 replications, consisted of 20 chickens in each replicate. The results of this experiment showed that diet containing 0.0, 12.5, 25.0 and 37.5% of solid respectively produced final live weight of broilers 2508, 2229 and 1880 g respectively, whereas control (0.0% of solid) was 2712 g. Feed conversion of the treatments were 2.39, 2.76, 3.24 respectively and without solid as control was 2.36. It is concluded that diet containing as much as 12.5% of solid can be used in broiler ration. Key Words: Solid, Broiler Chickens, Performance
Pre-and postcalving supplementation of multinutrient blocks on lactation and reproductive performances of grazing Bali cows Belli, H.L.L
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 1 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i1.502

Abstract

The influence of multinutrient blocks during pre and postcalving on lactation and reproductive performances of Bali cows were evaluated. Seventeen multiparous pregnant cows with body condition score (BCS) 1 to 2, approximately 90 d before the expected date of calving, were divided randomly into groups A (n=9) and B (n=8), and were grazed on the native pasture as a basal diet, while those of Group B received 1.25 kg multinutrient blocks, whose constituent was as follows (%): molasses (28), urea (5), coconut cake (15), fishmeal (5), rice bran (25), lime (8.5), salt (7.5), grit (5) and ultramineral (1). Cows were weighed and assessed for BCS (on a five-point scale) every two weeks, commencing at 12 weeks prior to calving, within 24 h after calving up to 16 weeks after calving. Milk production and composition were assessed by the weigh-suckle-weigh technique at four times i.e. 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after calving. Suckling behaviour i.e. frequency of suckling, duration of nursing and total min nursed were observed 6 times in the course of lactation at weekly intervals commencing at 1 week after calving. Calf birth weight was measured within 24 h after calving and continued at weekly intervals until 12 weeks of age. Uterine involution was determined by rectal palpation at 7 d postcalving. The interval from calving to first estrus was monitored by estrus observation twice a day. Conception at first service was assessed by pregnancy diagnosis 45 to 60 d after insemination. Cows fed multinutrient blocks supplement had higher liveweight, BCS throughout the experiment. The cows produced significantly more milk and had higher growth rates of the calves than the unsupplemented cows. The mean values of the characteristics of suckling were influenced by supplementation. The rate of uterine involution and conception to first service were similar in the two treatment groups, but interval from calving to the exhibition of the first estrus was shorter in supplemented cows. Key Words: Supplementation, Multinutrient Block, Bali Cows
Supplementation strategies to improve efficiency of rumen microbial protein synthesis on cattles fed with tropical grass hay Mulik, Marthen L
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 1 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i1.503

Abstract

This experiment aimed at increasing rumen microbial protein supply into intestine through ration manipulation. Four Santa Gertrudis steers with a mean liveweight (W) of 218 (±5.6) kg were used in a latin square design (4 x 4) to observe the effect of four diets on the efficiency of rumen microbial protein synthesis (EMPS). The steers were given pangola grass hay (8.5% protein) as the basal diet. The treatments were 1) pangola grass hay alone (KON), 2) pangola grass hay + 19 g urea/kg dry matter (DM) hay (URE), 3) as for treatment URE + a supplement mix at 0.5% W (SUP), and 4) as for treatment SUP + salt at 0.15% W (SUG). Urea was added into the hay to support a theoretical EMPS of 160 g MCP/kg digestible organic matter (DOM) whereas supplement mix contains fast, medium, and slow rumen fermentable energy and protein to synchronise energy and protein release in the rumen. Salt was added to alter passage rate of digesta. Addition of urea alone or with supplement mix increased EMPS significantly compared to KON (77 g MCP/kg DOM) but no difference between URE (119 g MCP/kg DOM) and SUP (110 g MCP/kg DOM). Addition of salt into supplement mix increased EMPS by 84% (140 g MCP/kg DOM). It might be concluded that rumen degradable protein (RDP) was deficient in steers fed low quality grass hay hence urea supplementation significantly increased EMPS to a similar extent as that of the supplement mix formulated to have a synchrony in protein and energy release.  Increasing fluid dilution rate, by adding salt, also had a dramatic affect on EMPS as observed in treatment SUG. It increased up to the level suggested in the International feeding standards.  Key Words: Microbial Protein, Soluble Protein, Dilution Rate, Supplement, Tropical Grass
SEVILLA and U.M. LUSTRIA. 2006. Changes in rumen ecosystem and feed dry matter degradability of buffalo which received rumen content of cattle through cross inoculation Pamungkas, Dicky; Sevilla, Cesar C; Lustria, Ulysses M
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 1 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i1.504

Abstract

The research was done to identify changes in rumen ecosystem of buffalo which received rumen content of cattle. As much as three head of fistulated male buffaloes (live weight of 450-550 kg) and three fistulated female cattle (live weight 250-380 kg) were used. This experiment was done three stage as follows: pre-inoculation, inoculation and post-inoculation. In Pre-inoculation, the sample of rumen content was taken two hours before morning feeding and directly observed for pH rumen liquor, ammonia nitrogen (NH3-N) and total volatile fatty acid (VFA). During the last three days of the first week of pre and post inoculation, the in situ dry matter digestibility was conducted. The samples were incubated for 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 48, and 72 hours in the rumen of the experimental animals. Napier grass, leucaena, and wheat pollard were incubated separately in the nylon bags to determine DM digestibility. The cross inoculation (total of rumen content) was done less than 10 minutes. In post-inoculation, the sample of rumen content was taken at two hours before morning feeding as long as two days of two weeks after inoculation. Changes in rumen ecosystem (pH, NH3-N and total VFA) were tested by using Completely Randomized Design. Result showed that the transfer of rumen content from cattle to buffalo significantly reduced the pH level in the rumen of buffalo. However, it had no significant effect on the ammonia concentration in the rumen of buffalo and showed significantly decreased of bacteria but it was not affect on the total count of protozoa and fungi. The transfer of rumen content from cattle to buffalo significantly decreased the value of insoluble and potential digestible fraction of leucaena. The DM effective degradability of Napier grass was significantly increase (P<0.05) within outflow rate 0.02 and 0.04 h-1 after cross inoculation. In wheat pollard, a significantly decrease (P<0.05) was occurred when outflow rate was observed at 0.04, 0.06 and 0.08 h-1 Key Words: Rumen Ecosystem, Cross Inoculation, Degradability
Lambing behavior of Garut ewes and its crosses with St. Croix and Moulton Charollais Inounu, Ismeth; Kurniawan, W; Noor, R
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 1 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i1.506

Abstract

Lamb mortality is highly related to ewe behavior at lambing. The purpose of this research was to study ewe lambing behavior and lamb behavior after birth of Garut (GG) sheep and its crosses with St. Croix (HH) and Moulton Charollais (MM). The number of observation were 106 head, consist of 32 GG; 23 of HG; 14 of MG; 31 of MHG and 6 of HMG crossed ewes. Analysis of variance of general linear model (GLM) for different number of sample was used to study ewe behavior of different group of ewes. Linear regression was used to analyze relationships between lambing behavior; times from birth to stand up and ewe body weight. While relationship between labor time and parity or type of birth were analyzed descriptively. Before lambing, ewes stood up, lain down, walked in circle, vocalized, urinated, flehmened, and pawed. HG and HMG ewes stood up less often than other breeds (P<0.05). Lambing time was distributed randomly for GG, HG, MG and MHG ewes, but HMG ewes mostly lambed at night (66.67%). Labor time of HMG ewes was significantly shorter than other breeds (P<0.05) and was not affected by birth weight, birth type and neither by parity. The ewes generally lambed in lay down position. After lambing, ewe normally stood up and cleaned the lamb immediately. The cleaning generally begin from the head progressed down to the whole body. The success for lamb to stand up was not significantly different among breeds. Key Words: Lambing Behavior, Garut, Crossbreeding, St. Croix, Moulton Charollais
The effect of kinds and concentration of cryoprotectant and thawing methods on frozen semen of Arab chicken Iskandar, Sofjan; Mardalestari, Rufika; Hernawati, Resmi; Mardiah, Enok; Wahyu, Endang
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 1 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i1.505

Abstract

The success of freezing chicken semen is the hope for preserving Indonesian native chickens. Semen from twenty Arab roosters were collected using massage technique once in a week. Cryoprotectant DMA (dimethyl acetamide) or DMF (dimethyl formalmide) of 7 or 9% and thawing A at temperature of 30oC for 30 seconds or in B at 5oC for 5 minutes. The volume of fresh semen was 0.3 ± 0.072 ml/ejaculate, white colour, rather thick to thick, with 2200 ± 372 millions sperms/ml and pH 6.95 ± 0.32, 4+/3+ mass movement, 80% motility, 84 ± 4.48% and abnormality of 14.75 ± 1.28%. There were not statistically significant (P>0.05) effect of interaction of treatments (kinds and concentrations of cryoprotectant, and thawing methods) on motility and live-sperms. Sperm motility preserved with DMA (34.69%) significantly higher than with DMF (29.84%). Sperm motility was also significantly higher (34.53%) when preserved with 7% cryoprotectant than with 9% (30%). Thawing-A significantly gave higher motility (35.31%) than thawing-B did (29.22%). Live-sperms of semen preserved with DMA (46.75%) was significantly higher than with DMF (41.72%). Cryoprotectant concentration of 7% gave higher live-sperms (46.98%) than of 9% did (41.48%). Thawing-A left live-sperms of 47.14%, which was significantly higher than thawing-B did (41.30%). Key Words: Frozen Semen, Arab Rooster, Cryoprotectants, Thawing Methods
Identification and characterisation of heat-stable allergens from Sarcoptes scabiei Tarigan, Simson
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 1 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i1.507

Abstract

Animals or human recovered from Sarcoptes scabiei infestation acquired protective immunity against reinfestation. The protective immunity is considered to be associated with a type-1-hypersensitivity reaction against allergens instigated by the mites during infestation. It is assumed that these allergens have the potential to be used as the main component of an anti-scabies vaccine. The purpose of this study is to identify and characterise the sarcoptic allergens. For this purpose, 645 mg of mites, collected from mangy goats, were homogenised in PBS to prepare soluble mite proteins. Fractionation of proteins was initially performed on a Q-sepharose column but the results were unsatisfactory. Consequently, SDS PAGE was used as an alternative. Proteins from the gel were transferred onto a nitrocellulose membrane. The membrane was cut into strips so each strip contained proteins with molecular weights of ³ 90, 80-90, 70-80, 60-70, 50-60, 40-50, 30-40, 25-30, 20-25, 15-20 and 10-15 kDa, respectively. The heat stability of the allergens was determined by heating the suspension at 60ºC for 60 minutes, whereas their dialysability was evaluated using a 10-kDa-cut-off ultramembrane. The activity of the allergens was assayed by an intradermal test on sensitised goats. This study showed that mite protein extract was very potent allergens since mite extract containing as little as 1 ng mite proteins still caused an obvious hypersensitive reaction. The mite extract contained heat-stable, dialysable and non-dialysable allergens. All fractions recovered from a Q-sepharose column contained allergens with almost equal potency. Fractionation with the SDS-PAGE revealed that the allergens had molecular weights of 35 and <10 kDa. The former allergen is assumed to be a member of group 10 allergens, whereas the later belong to haptenic allergens. Kata Kunci: Sarcoptes Scabiei, Allergens, Heat-Stable, Group 10, Hapten
Infection of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (ORT) in chickens in Indonesia Priadi, Adin; Natalia, Lily
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 1 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i1.508

Abstract

Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale is a bacterium identified as a new species in 1994 and generally associated with respiratory distress in chickens. From 214 of sinus swabs, tracheal swabs, lungs, airsac, liver heart blood samples and yolk sacs of chickens suffered from respiratory distresses, 6 isolates of O. rhinotracheale were isolated. These isolates were obtained from tracheal swabs of broiler chickens aged between 28-35 days old and broiler breeder of 32 weeks old. Upon incubated on blood agar for 48 hours at 37oC in a 5% CO2 atmosphere, round, convect and grey colonies with diametres of 1-2 mm were observed. The bacteria were pleomorphic, Gram negative rods, negative catalase and positive oxidase. Biochemically, the bacteria did not change potassium nitrate, tryptophan, glucose, arginine, urea, esculin, gelatine, arabinose, mannose, mannitol, N-acetyl-glucosamine, maltose, gluconate, caprate, adipate, malate, citrate and phenyl-acetate in API 20 NE system but β –galactosidase was produced. In the API 20 NE system, the isolates were identified as 0020004, 0060004, 0020104 codes. Tracheitis, air sacculitis, pneumonia and cheesy air sacs were pathological changes generally found in chickens infected with O. rhinotracheale. Trachea is the most important organ for the isolation of O. rhinotracheale. Key Words: Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale, Infection, Chicken, Indonesia
Enzyme-linked immunosorbent Assay for detecting of antibody to canine distemper virus ., Sudarisman
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 1 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i1.509

Abstract

Serum neutralisation test (SNT) has been established for evaluating canine distemper vaccination, but until now SNT was rarely used due to the need for continuous tissue culture facilities and requires 3 days to perform. For detecting antibody to canine distemper virus, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is relatively simple and rapid seroassay. ELISA for canine immunoglobulin (Ig) G antibodies to canine distemper virus (CDV) was developed by using Onderstepoort strain of canine distemper virus as coating antigen. Rabbit anti canine IgG labelled with horse radish peroxidase was used as the conjugate, while phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (OPD) was used as the substrate. The ELISA results were then compared with the results of the SNT, using the sera of 312 random-source dogs from West Java. The two test-results had a high degree of correlation. Very few discrepancies occurred and most of these were at the lower limits of each test. When the sera were tested at 1 : 100 dilutions, there was a 95.5% agreement between the ELISA and SNT. Their sensitivity and spesificity were 83.9 and 98.4%. Titrated SNT and ELISA also were performed on sera from 7 dogs whose lifetime medical histories were known. The antibodies were inclining up after two months of post vaccination, where the titre was not in zero/lower position at the day of vaccination. However, antibody zero or low position were found at 28 days post vaccination. All of the results indicated that ELISA can be used for evaluating antibody to canine distemper virus response, replacing the SNT. Key Words: ELISA, Serum Neutralization Test, Distemper, Dogs
Pesticide residues in brain tissues of dairy cattle in Lembang ., Indraningsih; Sani, Yulvian
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 11, No 1 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v11i1.510

Abstract

The use of pesticides to control plant diseases may cause residual formation in crops, its byproduct and environmental. Furthermore, the use of agriculture byproduct as animal feed may cause poisoning or residual formation in animal products. The purpose of this study is to investigate of pesticide residues in brain tissues of dairy cattle in relation to animal feed as a contamination source. Samples consisted of animal feeds (19 samples of fodder and 6 samples of feed), 31 samples of sera and 25 samples of brain tissues of dairy cattle collected from Lembang, West Java. Feeds and fodders were collected from dairy farms located in Lembang. Sera were directly collected from 31 heads of Frisien Holstein (FH) cattle from the same location, while brain tissues of FH cattle were collected from a local animal slaughtering house. Pesticide residues were analysed using gas chromatography (GC). Both residues of organochlorines and organophosphates were detected from brain tissues with average residue concentration OP was 22.7 ppb and OC was 5.1 ppb and a total residue was 27.8 ppb. The pesticide residues in brain tissues are new information that should be taken into consideration since the Indonesian consumed this tissues as an oval. Although pesticides residue concentration was low, pathological changes were noted microscopically from the brain tissues including extracellular vacuolisation, focal necrosis, haemorrhages, dilatation of basement membrane without cellular infiltration. Both pesticide residues were also detected in sera, where OP (9.0 ppb) was higher than OC (4.9 ppb). These pesticides were also detected in animal feeds consisting fodders and feeds. Residues of OP (12.0 ppb) were higher than OC (1.8 ppb) in feeds, but residues of OP (16.8 ppb) were lower than OC (18.7 ppb) in fodders. Although, pesticide residues in sera and brain tissues were below the maximum residue limits (MRL) of fat, the presence of pesticides in brain tissues should be taken into consideration as their effects in brain lesions. There was a correlation between contaminant found in animal feeds and pesticide residues in sera and brain tissues of dairy cattle. Key Words: Pesticides, Residues, Brain, Dairy Cattle

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