cover
Contact Name
Ahmadi Riyanto
Contact Email
medpub@litbang.deptan.go.id
Phone
-
Journal Mail Official
ahmadi_puslitbangnak@yahoo.com
Editorial Address
-
Location
Kota bogor,
Jawa barat
INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 19 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 10, No 4 (2005)" : 19 Documents clear
Growth and carcass development of Kedu x Arab cross under two feeding regimes Iskandar, Sofjan
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 4 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i4.450

Abstract

One hundred unsexed chicks of each group of Kedu x Arab cross, of Arab x Arab and of Kedu x Kedu were kept under intensive husbandry for about 52 days (from 32 to 84 days of age). Each group was allocated to 10 cages of 10 unsexed birds. Experimental rations consisted of main ingredients of ground yellow corn, soybean meal, rice bran and fishmeal. Experimental ration were R1 containing energy of 2920 kkal ME/kg with crude protein of 15.17%. R2a contained energy of 3087 kkal ME/kg with crude protein of 7.36% and R2b contained energy of 2336 kkal ME/kg with crude protein of 42,51%. R1 ration was given ad libitum for 24 hours and R2a ration was given from 08.00 a.m.–12.00 p.m. and continued with R2b ration was given up to 8.00 a.m. in the following day. Results showed that live bodyweight and bodyweight gain were not significantly different among the three groups of chicken. Feed consumption of Kedu x Arab cross was significantly lower than that of Kedu x Kedu nor Arab x Arab. Feed conversion ratio of Kedu x Arab cross was also significantly lower (3.74) than its comparative groups. Birds on R1 ration grew faster (804 g/bird) than that on R2a-R2b ration (738 g/bird) with feed consumption of 2135 g bird-1 52 day-1 on R1 ration versus 2338 g bird-1 52 day-1 on R2a-R2b ration. FCR of the birds were lower on R1 ration (3.44) than on R2a-R2b ration (4.26). Energy consumption, protein consumption, protein efficiency ratio, energy efficiency ratio did not show significant different among the three groups of chicken, but for all those variables under R1 ration were significantly higher than for those under R2a-R2b ration. Whole carcass and carcass cuts were not significantly affected by neither the kind of chickens nor dietary treatments. Development of liver was the slowest among development of other carcass cuts and organs, whilst development of breast meat was 4.4–6.0 times, and drumstick meat was 4.6–6.6 times.     Key Words: Kedu x Arab Cross Chicken, Growth, Carcass
Growth of reproductive organ and its effect on laying performance of medium ype layer due to different levels of dietary protein in growing period Suprijatna, Edjeng; Natawihardja, Dulatip
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 4 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i4.451

Abstract

The purpose of this experiment was to study the optimal of dietary protein level of medium type layer in growing period associated with the growth of reproductive organ and the effect on laying performance. The experiment used 480 pullets of 10 weeks old grouped into three treatments of three protein levels, 12, 15 and 18. In laying period all of the treatments used the same ration with 15% protein. The results showed that dietary protein level in growing period significantly affected the growth of reproduction organ, growth performance and eggs quality. Effects of treatment in laying period was significantly different on laying performance only in early laying period, and subsequent period was not differently different. The conclusion of this experiment was the level of 12% adequate for minimal growth, level of 15% adequate for optimal growth and level 18% showed better performances during laying period. The results suggest that in growing period the dietary protein level is not below 15%.     Key Words: Protein, Reproduction Organ, Laying Performance
The nutritional quality of herbaceous legumes on goats: Intake, digestibility and nitrogen balances Ginting, Simon P; Tarigan, Andi
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 4 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i4.452

Abstract

The availability of forages is a critical factor that determine the sustainability of the animal-plantation production system. In this typical production system, cover crops could be an important sources of forages to support the animal production. The study is aimed to evaluate the nutritional quality (chemical compositions, intake, digestibility and N balances) of herbaceous legumes namely Arachis pintoi and Arachis glabrata having potential for used as alternative cover crops in plantation. Centerocema pubescens, a conventional cover crops used in plantation, was used as control. Twenty-one mature male goats (16-18 kg) were used in this experiment. The animals were put in individual metabolism cages, divided into three groups (7 animal per group) based on the body weight, and were randomly allocated into one of the three forages. The experiment was run in a Completely Randomized Design. The animals were allocated to an adaptation period for 14 days, followed by intake measurement for 5 days and fecal and urine collection for the next 7 days. During the fecal and urine collection forages were offered at 90% of the maximum intake. Chemical analyses showed that the DM and OM contents were relatively equal among the forages, but the crude protein content of C. pubescens (23.56%) are relatively higher than those of A. pintoi (16.94%) or of A. glabrata (15.19%) The fiber (NDF) content was also relatively higher in C. pubescens (59.37%) than in A. pintoi (16.94%) or A. glabrata (41.50%). The forage intake was highest (P<0.05) in goats fed C. pubescens (493 g/d), and were not different (P>0.05) between goats fed A. pintoi (466 g/d) or A. glabrata (453 g/d). A similar trend was seen when intake was expressed as % BW (3.80, 3.50 and 3.40, respectively) or as g/kg BW0.75 (42.4, 39.5 and 38.4, respectively). The digestion coeficient of DM (81.3%) or OM (83.5%) were highest (P<0.05) in A. pintoi and were not different (P>0.05) between A. glabrata (71.9 and 73.2%, respectively) and C. pubescens (73.7 and 74.2%, respectively). The trends were the same with the digestion coeficient of ADF and the energy. The ADF digestibility were 67.8, 55.9 and 54.5% in A. pintoi, A. glabrata and C. pubescens, respectively). The energy digestibility were 81.8, 67.5 and 69.4% in A. pintoi, A. glabrata and C. pubescens, respectively. The N balances were positive in goats fed these three forages, but the highest (P<0.05) N retention was observed in goats offered C. pubescens (17.7 g/d) as compared to those fed A. pintoi (9.4 g/d) or A. glabrata (7.7 g/d). The higher intake level in goats fed C. pubescens and its higher N content seemed to be the main reason for the highest N retention. It is concluded that based on these nutritive parameters, C. Pubescens has superior nutritive quality compared to A. pintoi and A. glabrata, while the A. pintoi seemed to be better than the A. glabrata.     Key Words: Legumes, Cover Crops, Nutritive Quality, Goats
The formation of ‘ruminal bypass protein’ (in vitro) by adding tannins isolated from Calliandra calothyrsus leaves or formaldehyde Wina, Elizabeth; Abdurohman, Dindin
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 4 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i4.453

Abstract

Ruminal bypass protein’ is one of the strategies to increase the amount of protein, which enters abomasum and hence, increases ruminant productivity. One of the strategies to obtain “ruminal bypass protein” is by complexing tannin or formaldehyde with protein. Two experiments were conducted. The first experiment aimed to obtain the optimum level of added tannins to decrease the dry matter digestibility of protein sources. Tannins were isolated from Calliandra calothyrsus leaves. Tannins were added at the level of 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mg to each in vitro tube containing 0.5 g of protein source (gliricidia leaves, soybean meal or casein) and the tubes were incubated for 48 hours. The result showed that the optimum level of tannin was 60 mg/g of gliricidia leaves or casein and 80 mg/g of soybean meal. The second experiment aimed to compare the ability of tannin to formaldehyde to form complex with protein. One set of tubes containing tannin-protein or formaldehyde-protein complex was incubated with rumen liquor for 48 h and another set was incubated with rumen liquor (48h) and followed by pepsin-HCl for 24 h (total incubation time: 72 h). After incubation at 48 h or 72 h, the dry matter or protein digestibility of tannin-protein complex was much higher than those of formaldehyde-protein complex. The amount of ruminal bypass protein was almost similar between the two agents to complex gliricidia leaves (34.4 and 32.1 g/100g for tannin-gliricidia and formaldehyde-gliricidia, respectively). Tannin-soybean meal interaction produced 27.9 g/100 g of ‘ruminal bypass protein’, which was half of that from reaction between formaldehyde and soybean meal (54.1 g/100 g). Tannin-casein complex was easily broken down in the rumen so that ‘ruminal bypass protein’ from this complex was very small. It can be concluded that the ability of tannin to form ‘ruminal bypass protein’ depends on the type of protein source but is the same with the ability of formaldehyde to bind forage protein (Gliricidia sepium). Further feeding evaluation of these tannin-protein complexes is warranted.     Key Words: Ruminal Bypass protein, Calliandra calothyrsus, Tannin, Formaldehyde
Estimated analysis criteria of hatched weight and body weight 12 weeks of Kampung chicken selection Pamungkas, Fitra Aji
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 4 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i4.454

Abstract

Genetic parameter estimation for production traits are important in designing genetic selection program for Kampung chicken. The aimed of this research is to study heritability, accuracy of selection, and phenotypic and genotypic correlation of hatched weight and body weight at 12 weeks of Kampung chicken. Five hundred and fourteen head of Kampung chicken consist of 13 cocks, 65 hens, and 436 chicks were used in this study. Nested design analysis were used as described by Becker. The heritability estimation of hatched weight was calculated based on paternal half-sib, maternal half-sib, and full-sib corelation and it’s values were 0.35, 0.37, and 0.36 respectively. Heritability of body weight at 12 weeks based on paternal half-sib, maternal half-sib, and full-sib corelation were 0.27, 0.18, and 0.22 respectively. Selection accuracy of hatched weight were 59-61%, and selection accuracy of body weight at 12 weeks were 42 up to 52%. Genotypic and phenotypic correlation of hatched weight and body weight at 12 weeks estimation based on paternal half-sib, maternal half-sib, full-sib corelation were 0.29, 0.78, 0.51, and 0.17 respectively, indicated selection on one trait will affected the response on other traits positively.     Key Words: Heritability, Selection, Kampung Chicken
Effect the administration of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) hormone following superovulation treatment in buffalo Situmorang, Polmer
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 4 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i4.455

Abstract

A numbers of studies had been reported to evaluate the effect of hormone for superovulation treatment in buffaloes, however the numbers of embryo recovered is still very small. One of the limiting factors which affect the numbers of embryo recovered is preovulatery LH concentration. The experiment was carried out to study the effect of hCG following superovulation treatments in buffaloes as an effort to increase the embryo recovered. Ten (10) buffaloes in three different genotypes (Riverine, swamp and its crosses) were superovulated using follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). A total of 12 ml FSH (Folltropin) was injected intramuscularry twice a day with 12 hours interval in a decreasing doses for 4 days (2.5, 2.5; 2.0, 2.0; 1.0, 1.0 and 0.5, 0.5 ml). Prostaglandin was injected intramuscularry 2 days after the first injection of FSH followed by administration of 500 IU hCG two days later. At the same days of administration of hCG, artificial insemination (AI) using frozen semen was conducted and repeated again after 12 and 24 hours. Blood collecting was conducted 3 times a week for obtaining the progesteron level of plasma blood. Embryo was collected by non-surgically technique on day 6 of estrus cycle by flushing each horn of uterus with 500 ml Dubelcos Phosphat Buffer Saline (DBPS). Parameter recorded were diameter of ovary (DO), total corpus luteum (TCL), number of embryo collected (NE), percentage of recovery rate (%RR) and peak progesteron level (PP). Administration of hCG significantly increase the response of buffalo to superovulation treatment. The mean of DO (cm), TCL, NE and RR (%) was 4.0, 6.3, 2.1 and 37.2 and 4.5, 7.5, 3.9 and 48.1 for controll and 500 IU hCG respectively. The mean NE was significantly higher (P<0.05) in hCG than those control. The peak progesterone concentration was highly significant higher (P<0.01) in hCG (8.9 ng/ml) than those control (6.8 ng/ml). Both left and right ovary gave a similar response to superovulation treatments. In conclusion the admission of hCG following superovulation treatments using folltrophin increase the number of embryos recovered.     Key Words: hCG, Superovulation, Buffalo, Embryo
Gastrointestinal nematode infections in sheep and goats in West Java, Indonesia ., Beriajaya
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 4 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i4.456

Abstract

These studies were carried out in three locations representing low, medium and high altitudes in West Java to determine the effects of season, climate, management, growth and mortality on nematode parasitism in sheep and goats. Basically, the animals in each location were divided into treated and untreated groups with anthelmintics. Animals were weighed and faecal samples were collected every 2 to 4 weeks. Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus spp. were the predominant species of gastrointestinal nematodes recovered from faecal cultures. In low altitude areas, faecal egg counts dropped progressively throughout the dry season and rose again with the onset of the wet season. The proportion of H. contortus larvae decreased progressively throughout the dry season and increased with the onset of the wet season, however the opposite pattern occurred with proportions of larvae of Trichostrongylus spp. In medium altitude areas, there was no consistent pattern of rising or falling faecal egg counts associated with fluctuations in rainfall. In high altitude areas, there was a trend for egg counts to increase progressively after the onset of the wet season even faecal egg counts were below 1500 epg. After treated with anthelmintics, faecal egg counts were suppressed to only few eggs in two weeks and then rose again in four week later, however in animals received medicated phenothiazine, mean egg counts were maintained below 500 epg. Treated animals in medium areas maintained low egg counts until the end of the trial. Seasonal fluctuation in weight gain of sheep was observed in low areas. Treated animals had significantly lower mortality than untreated animals but the evidence that parasitism contributed to this mortality is persuasive. It was concluded that nematode parasites cause a significant loss of production in sheep during wet season in coastal regions and in areas of rainfall throughout the year.     Key Words: Sheep, Goat, Nematode, Anthelmintic
Effect of methanol extracts of nony fruit on mice infected by RH strain of Toxoplasma gondii Subekti, Didik T; Sari, Eka S.P; Widiastuti, Dwi R; Haerlani, Rica; Fitri Diani, Eka; Iskandar, Tolibin; Laksmitawati, Dian R
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 4 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i4.457

Abstract

Intraperitoneal infection of Type I Toxoplasma gondii on mice causes high mortality at a short time due to parasitic burden, immunosuppression, cell and tissue damage. The mice survival is increased after treated with drugs that reduce or destroy tachyzoite and modulate or recovered the immune system. Nony fruit (Morinda citrifolia) is popular as immunomudulator and has antoxoplasma properties. The purpose of this experiment is to evaluate the effect of ethanol extract of nony fruit and Fansidar® (pyrimethamine-sulfadiazine) to reduce tachyzoite and improve survival as well as immunomudulator on mice following toxoplasma infection. Mice was divided into six groups (10 mice respectively) consist of infected-non treated groups, infected + Fansidar®, infected + ethanol extract of nony on several doses (100, 50, 25%) and non infected-non treated groups. All mice on each groups were infected intraperitoneally by 5 x 106 and 2,5 x 103 RH strain of Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoite/mice respectively. The results have shown that Fansidar® was successfully to reduced tachyzoite and improved mice survival but the ethanol extract of nony fruit was failed.     Key Words: Survivality, Immunomodulator, Toxoplasma gondii, Nony extracts
Development inactivated vaccine prototype of avian influenza (AI) H5N1 local isolate and its application at laboratory level Indriani, R; Dharmayanti, N.L.P.I; Syafriati, T; Wiyono, A; Adjid, R.M.A
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 4 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i4.458

Abstract

A preliminary study related on vaccine safety and vaccination effectivity for controlling avian influenza (AI) subtype H5N1 was carried out at Virology Laboratorium, Indonesian Veteriner Institute, Bogor. A Prototype of inactivated vaccine was made using AI H5N1 local isolate (A/Chicken/West Java/67-2/2003). The vaccine was then tested for safety and protection in DOC of layers. Antibody response, protection and shedding virus challenge were observed in the experiment. Result showed that the vaccine was saved and protected against virulent viral challenge. Efective vaccination was achieved at 3 weeks chicken old started with low level of antibody. Antibody titre increased gradually and reached the top at 8 weeks post vaccination. Challenge test using AI virulent at the age of 4 and 8 weeks post vaccination showed that the vaccine gave high protection (90%). Viral shedding was not longer expressed than 7 days after challenge. It is concluded that this prototype is a satisfied AI vaccine in laboratory level.     Key Words: Vaccine, Avian Influenza, H5N1, HPAI
Monitoring of avian influenza cases based on the detection of viral antigen subtype H5N1 by immunohistochemical technique Damayanti, Rini; Dharmayanti, N.L.P.I; Indriani, R.; Wiyono, A.; Adjid, R.M.A
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 4 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i4.1106

Abstract

Monitoring on the cases of Avian Influenza virus was conducted by detecting viral antigen subtype H5N1 usingimmunohistochemical technique. A total of 212 sampels of various avian tissues were collected from the Provinces of East Java(Districts of Madiun, Tulung Agung, Blitar and Kediri), West Java (Districts of Bogor, Bekasi, Cianjur and Sukabumi), Banten(Districts of Pandeglang and Tangerang) and DKI Jakarta. The sampels were collected four times i.e. June 2004, September2004, October 2004 and between January and February 2005. All sampels were stained using immunohistochemical technique.The antigen could be visualized clearly both in the intra-nuclear and intra-cytoplasmic areas of brain, comb, wattle, trachea,lung, heart, breast and thigh muscle, proventriculus, liver, spleen, kidney, intestine and ovary. A number of 39 of 212 cases(18.4%) have been catagorized as positives. The results show that monitoring of HPAI cases conducted in June and September2004 in the Provinces of West Java, Banten and East Java, none of the sampels were positive. However, monitoring of thedisease in September 2004 in the Province of Jakarta showed that AI virus antigen were detected in various organs of chickenfrom Jakarta. Furthermore, monitoring of the disease conducted between October 2004 and February 2005 revealed that AI virusantigen were also detected in chicken not only from Jakarta Provinces but also from Provinces of Banten and West Java. Basedon these results, it is concluded that between June and September 2004, HPAI infection were not found in areas where previousoutbreaks occured in the Provinces of Banten, West Java and East Java. However, the disease was spread in Jakarta Province inSeptember 2004 and subsequently to some districts in the Provinces of Banten and West Java. A part from this, anticipation ofdisease spread to currently AI-free areas should be considered as part of disease monitoring system.Key Words: Avian Influenza, H5N1, Monitoring, Immunohistochemistry, Poultry

Page 1 of 2 | Total Record : 19


Filter by Year

2005 2005


Filter By Issues
All Issue Vol 24, No 3 (2019): SEPTEMBER 2019 Vol 24, No 2 (2019): JUNE 2019 Vol 24, No 2 (2019): JUNE 2019 Vol 24, No 1 (2019): MARCH 2019 Vol 23, No 4 (2018): DECEMBER 2018 Vol 23, No 3 (2018): SEPTEMBER 2018 Vol 23, No 2 (2018): JUNE 2018 Vol 23, No 1 (2018): MARCH 2018 Vol 22, No 4 (2017): DECEMBER 2017 Vol 22, No 3 (2017): SEPTEMBER 2017 Vol 22, No 2 (2017): JUNE 2017 Vol 22, No 1 (2017): MARCH 2017 Vol 21, No 4 (2016): DECEMBER 2016 Vol 21, No 3 (2016): SEPTEMBER 2016 Vol 21, No 2 (2016): JUNE 2016 Vol 21, No 1 (2016): MARCH 2016 Vol 20, No 4 (2015): DECEMBER 2015 Vol 20, No 3 (2015): SEPTEMBER 2015 Vol 20, No 2 (2015): JUNE 2015 Vol 20, No 1 (2015): MARCH 2015 Vol 20, No 1 (2015) Vol 19, No 4 (2014): DECEMBER 2014 Vol 19, No 4 (2014) Vol 19, No 3 (2014): SEPTEMBER 2014 Vol 19, No 3 (2014) Vol 19, No 2 (2014): JUNE 2014 Vol 19, No 2 (2014) Vol 19, No 1 (2014): MARCH 2014 Vol 19, No 1 (2014) Vol 18, No 4 (2013): DECEMBER 2013 Vol 18, No 4 (2013) Vol 18, No 3 (2013): SEPTEMBER 2013 Vol 18, No 3 (2013) Vol 18, No 2 (2013): JUNE 2013 Vol 18, No 2 (2013) Vol 18, No 1 (2013): MARCH 2013 Vol 18, No 1 (2013) Vol 17, No 4 (2012): DECEMBER 2012 Vol 17, No 4 (2012) Vol 17, No 3 (2012): SEPTEMBER 2012 Vol 17, No 3 (2012) Vol 17, No 2 (2012): JUNE 2012 Vol 17, No 2 (2012) Vol 17, No 1 (2012): MARCH 2012 Vol 17, No 1 (2012) Vol 16, No 4 (2011): DECEMBER 2011 Vol 16, No 4 (2011) Vol 16, No 3 (2011): SEPTEMBER 2011 Vol 16, No 3 (2011) Vol 16, No 2 (2011): JUNE 2011 Vol 16, No 2 (2011) Vol 16, No 1 (2011): MARCH 2011 Vol 16, No 1 (2011) Vol 15, No 4 (2010): DECEMBER 2010 Vol 15, No 4 (2010) Vol 15, No 3 (2010): SEPTEMBER 2010 Vol 15, No 3 (2010) Vol 15, No 2 (2010): JUNE 2010 Vol 15, No 2 (2010) Vol 15, No 1 (2010): MARCH 2010 Vol 15, No 1 (2010) Vol 14, No 4 (2009): DECEMBER 2009 Vol 14, No 4 (2009) Vol 14, No 3 (2009): SEPTEMBER 2009 Vol 14, No 3 (2009) Vol 14, No 2 (2009): JUNE 2009 Vol 14, No 2 (2009) Vol 14, No 1 (2009): MARCH 2009 Vol 14, No 1 (2009) Vol 13, No 4 (2008): DECEMBER 2008 Vol 13, No 4 (2008) Vol 13, No 3 (2008): SEPTEMBER 2008 Vol 13, No 3 (2008) Vol 13, No 2 (2008): JUNE 2008 Vol 13, No 2 (2008) Vol 13, No 1 (2008): MARCH 2008 Vol 13, No 1 (2008) Vol 12, No 4 (2007): DECEMBER 2007 Vol 12, No 4 (2007) Vol 12, No 3 (2007): SEPTEMBER 2007 Vol 12, No 3 (2007) Vol 12, No 2 (2007): JUNE 2007 Vol 12, No 2 (2007) Vol 12, No 1 (2007): MARCH 2007 Vol 12, No 1 (2007) Vol 11, No 4 (2006): DECEMBER 2006 Vol 11, No 4 (2006) Vol 11, No 3 (2006): SEPTEMBER 2006 Vol 11, No 3 (2006) Vol 11, No 2 (2006): JUNE 2006 Vol 11, No 2 (2006) Vol 11, No 1 (2006) Vol 10, No 4 (2005): DECEMBER 2005 Vol 10, No 4 (2005) Vol 10, No 3 (2005): SEPTEMBER 2005 Vol 10, No 3 (2005) Vol 10, No 2 (2005): JUNE 2005 Vol 10, No 2 (2005) Vol 10, No 1 (2005): MARCH 2005 Vol 10, No 1 (2005) Vol 9, No 4 (2004): DECEMBER 2004 Vol 9, No 4 (2004) Vol 9, No 3 (2004): SEPTEMBER 2004 Vol 9, No 3 (2004) Vol 9, No 2 (2004): JUNE 2004 Vol 9, No 2 (2004) Vol 9, No 1 (2004): MARCH 2004 Vol 9, No 1 (2004) Vol 8, No 4 (2003): DECEMBER 2003 Vol 8, No 4 (2003) Vol 8, No 3 (2003): SEPTEMBER 2003 Vol 8, No 3 (2003) Vol 8, No 2 (2003): JUNE 2003 Vol 8, No 2 (2003) Vol 8, No 1 (2003): MARCH 2003 Vol 8, No 1 (2003) Vol 7, No 4 (2002): DECEMBER 2002 Vol 7, No 4 (2002) Vol 7, No 3 (2002): SEPTEMBER 2002 Vol 7, No 3 (2002) Vol 7, No 2 (2002): JUNE 2002 Vol 7, No 2 (2002) Vol 7, No 1 (2002): MARCH 2002 Vol 7, No 1 (2002) Vol 6, No 4 (2001): DECEMBER 2001 Vol 6, No 4 (2001) Vol 6, No 3 (2001): SEPTEMBER 2001 Vol 6, No 3 (2001) Vol 6, No 2 (2001): JUNE 2001 Vol 6, No 2 (2001) Vol 6, No 1 (2001): MARCH 2001 Vol 6, No 1 (2001) Vol 5, No 4 (2000): DECEMBER 2000 Vol 5, No 4 (2000) Vol 5, No 3 (2000): SEPTEMBER 2000 Vol 5, No 3 (2000) Vol 5, No 2 (2000): JUNE 2000 Vol 5, No 2 (2000) Vol 5, No 1 (2000): MARCH 2000 Vol 5, No 1 (2000) Vol 4, No 4 (1999): DECEMBER 1999 Vol 4, No 4 (1999) Vol 4, No 3 (1999): SEPTEMBER 1999 Vol 4, No 3 (1999) Vol 4, No 2 (1999): JUNE 1999 Vol 4, No 2 (1999) Vol 4, No 1 (1999): MARCH 1999 Vol 4, No 1 (1999) Vol 3, No 4 (1998) Vol 3, No 3 (1998) Vol 3, No 2 (1998) Vol 3, No 1 (1998) Vol 2, No 4 (1998) Vol 2, No 3 (1997) Vol 2, No 2 (1996) Vol 2, No 1 (1996) Vol 1, No 3 (1995) Vol 1, No 2 (1995) Vol 1, No 1 (1995) More Issue