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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
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Articles 20 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 10, No 3 (2005)" : 20 Documents clear
The effect of Aloe vera bioactive and anthraquinone on the performance of laying hens Pasaribu, Tiurma; Sinurat, A.P; Rakhman, Susana I.W
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 3 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i3.440

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to study the use of Aloe vera bioactives as feed additives on the performances of laying hens. The Aloe vera bioactives was prepared as the dry gel (DG) and semi liquid gel (SLG). The Aloe vera was suplemented into the diets with concentration of equal to 0.5 and 1.0 g DG/kg diets. Diets contained commercial anthraquinone, a bioactive compound of Aloe vera with doses equal to 0.5 g DG and 1.0 dg/kg were also prepared. Diets were compared to control diets containing with and without antibiotic. Two hundred of fifty six laying hens strain Isa Brown aged 19 weeks were used for the experiment. Each treatment had 8 replicates with 4 hens in each replicate. The treatments were carried out for 30 weeks and parameters measured were egg production (% hen day/HD), egg weight, feed conversion ratio (FCR), feed consumption, egg quality, and mortality. Results showed that feed consumption was not significantly different (P>0.05), however DG 1.0 g/kg and anthraquinone 0.5 g/kg tended to decrease the feed consumption. Egg production was not significantly affected by antibiotic, DG, SLG, or anthraquinone (0.5 g/kg), but anthraquinone 1.0 g/kg had more egg production than control. Higher concentration of DG, SLG, and anthraquinone 1.0 g/kg gave better FCR than those of lower dosage (0.5 g/kg). Haugh unit was not affected by the treatment while yolk weight, egg shell and shell weight was significantly decreased by anthraquinone 0.5 g/kg (P<0.05). Mortality from all treatments was only 1.6%. It was concluded that treated by anthraquinone was better than that by Aloe vera, however, they were not significantly different. For the healthy reason, the use of Aloe vera is more saver than the use of anthraquinone.     Key Words: Bioactives, Productivity, Layer
Production and nitrogen uptake of grasses on different shading and fertilization Sirait, J; Purwantari, N.D; Simanihuruk, K
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 3 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i3.441

Abstract

An experiment was conducted in Indonesian Research Institute for Animal Production (IRIAP) Bogor, West Java. The objective of this research was to study the production and nitrogen uptake of three short grasses species for grazing namely Paspalum notatum, Brachiaria humidicola, Stenotaphrum secundatum on different shading and fertilization. This experiment was arranged in split-split plot design. The main plot was shading level (0, 38, and 56%); sub-plot was fertilizer dosage (0, 100, and 200 kg N/ha) while sub-sub plot was grass species. Data were analyzed by analysis of variance, and continued with Duncan multiple range test (DMRT) if there were significantly different among treatments. The highest shoot production, shoot/root ratio, and crude protein content were observed on S. secundatum with 38% shading levels and 100 kg N/ha fertilizer. The higher shading level had the lower nitrogen uptake by plant, whereas the higher fertilizer dosage gave higher nitrogen uptake.     Key Words: Shading, Fertilization, Production, Nitrogen Uptake
Response of Calliandra calothyrsus to inoculation of mutant strain of rhizobia Purwantari, N.D; Sutedi, E
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 3 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i3.442

Abstract

Rifampicin mutants of rhizobial strain CB3171rif50 and CB3090rif100 were the most effective nitrogen fixing strain of rhizobia selected under axenic condition. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the symbiotic response of C. Calothyrsus inoculated by CB3171rif50 or CB3090rif100 grown in the field, on latosol soil with pH 5,2. Plants were either (1) inoculated with mutant strain CB3171rif50, (2) inoculated with mutant strain mutant CB3090rif100 (3) uninoculated and without nitrogen addition or (4) uninoculated and with nitrogen fertilizer as a basal fertilizer. Treatments were replicated four times and arranged in Randomized Complete Block Design. Parameters measured were plant height at early stage of the growth, leaf weight, stem weight, nodule number and weight, proportion of nodule formed by inoculant, N and P content of leaf. Results shows that C. calothyrsus was responded to Rhizobium inoculation. The rate of regrowth was faster for the inoculated plant than that of uninoculated and no nitrogen addition. CB3171rif50 produced significantly (P<0.05) the highest leaf fresh and dry weight. At the first harvest (10 month-old of plant) it produced 2106 g/tree that equivalent to 18.72 ton/ha. The lowest was achieved by uninoculated plant which was 556 g/tree that equivalent to 4.94 ton/ha. The production of shoot was increased at the subsequent harvests. CB3171rif50 was out yielded in all harvest, except for the second harvest. The highest total production of leaf fresh weight was obtained by plant inoculated with strain mutan CB3171rif50 which was 50.62 ton ha-1 year-1, followed by CB3090rif100, which was 39.75 ton ha-1 year-1 and the lowest was obtained by uninoculated plant, in a range of 29.64–30.62 ton ha-1 year-1. Nodule recovery shows that nodule samples from uninoculated plant were not resistant to 50 ppm and 100 ppm rifampicin antibiotic that means not producing mutant strain, indicating that those nodules were from the native rhizobial strains. Recovery of nodules showed that proportion of nodules infected by strain mutant CB3171rif50 was 61.3% from nodules tested and nodules infected by CB3090rif100 was 20%. Both mutant strains inoculation have increased the plant production and reinoculation was not necessary till 19 month-old of the plant. Re-inoculation should be considered after this period.     Key Words: Calliandra calothyrsus, Rhizobium, Mutant, Inoculation
Nematodiasis in sheep and goats kept under traditional farming practice in Batujajar ., Beriajaya
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 3 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i3.443

Abstract

This study was conducted to determine the relation of age, sex, season and reproduction on gastrointestinal nematode parasitism of the two most commonly kept breeds of sheep and goat in Bogor district. A total of 119 Indonesian Thin Tail (ITT) sheep and 130 Peranakan Etawah (PE) goats with different age and sex were monitored for 16 months. Age of sheep and goat was divided into 3 groups respectively, i.e. before weaning (<4 months) 35 and 32, after weaning (4-8 months) 53 and 63; and adults (>8 months) 31 and 35. Each 4 weeks, individual faeces were collected and individual animals were weighed. Information on the mortality, morbidity, pregnancy, slaughtered and sold was recorded. The results showed that Haemonchus contortus and Trichostrongylus spp. were dominant species of nematodes found in the faecal cultured. In the period of monitoring, egg counts of nematodes in sheep were higher (P<0.05) than in goats, however both animals have similar pattern of egg counts. In the first three months, the egg counts remained steady relatively in 3 groups of age, but soon after that the egg counts increased and reached its peak (in March) of 6186 eggs in sheep and 3434 in goats, there after they decreased along with the onset of dry season. A part from this, the egg counts increased (P<0.05) three months before lambing and remained steady until 2 months after partus in sheep, but not in goats. During the monitoring period, weight gain in wet season was lower (P<0.05) as compared to dry season. There was no effect of sex on faecal egg count in either sheep or goats although male sheep had higher egg counts than female sheep had in November and January. Evidence of diarrhoeic faeces was higher in wet season than in dry season.     Key Words: Haemonchus contortus, Trichostronglysus spp., Sheep, Goats
Production and purification of Bacillus anthracis protective antigen Tarigan, Simson; Adji, Rahmat S; Natalia, Lily
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 3 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i3.445

Abstract

Protective antigen (PA) plays crucial roles in the pathogenicity and virulence of Bacillus anthracis. Animals or human immunised with the protein acquire a complete protection against the disease. In addition to vaccine, PA can also be developed into a sensitive diagnostic test for anthrax. The purpose of this study was to produce PA using a culture medium easily obtained, and to develop a simple and effective technique for purification of the protein. To produce PA, B. anthracis Sterne 34F2 strain was first grown on blood agar, then bacterial colonies were suspended and incubated for 2 hours in RPMI-1640 supplemented with NaHCO3 and Tris. Protein components in the culture supernatant were separated consecutively with Phenyl sepharose, Qsepharose and Superdex-200 columns. This order was used in order to simplify and speed up the purification process. The PA contained in the fractions was detected by a dot blot or an ELISA using commercial PA specific antibody. The PA was absorbed strongly by the phenyl sepharose whereas other proteins were absorbed weakly or not absorbed at all. When these PA-containing fractions were loaded into Q-sepharose column, PA was absorbed considerably weaker than contaminated proteins. Although the level of purity obtained from the Q-sepharose column was satisfactory, further separation on Superdex produced an even higher purity. However, on SDS-PAGE analysis, the purified PA was seen as a two-band protein (54.7 and 29.2 kDa) because of nicked proteolysis. On an immunoblot assay, only the 54.7 band was recognised by the PA-specific antibody. Despite the nick proteolysis, the PA purified in this study was considered to retain its biological activities.     Key Words: Bacillus anthracis, Protective Antigen, Protein Purification
Indonesian avian influenza viruses character in second wave epidemic Dharmayanti, N.L.P.I.; Indriani, R; Damayanti, R; Wiyono, A; Adjid, R.M.A.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 3 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i3.446

Abstract

Second wave of epidemic avian influenza occurred from December 2004 until April 2005. In March 2005, the disease had infected some districts in South Sulawesi such as Wajo and Sopeng. More than 21 field isolates have been collected and identified as avian influenza virus subtype H5N1. In this study further characterized was undertaken for 14 isolates of avian influenza using Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) and sequencing in region of HA1 gene. It was then followed by genetic analysis to identify the mutation and phylogenetic relationship of the isolates. The study indicates that the Indonesia isolates collected in second wave epidemic are generally having a different group to the isolates group in 2003 and 2004. There is point mutation in the nucleotide sequence of the isolate collected at August 2004-March 2005, that is the replacement of adenine by guanine in the position of 195.     Key Words: Avian Influenza Virus, Second Epidemic Wave, Mutation
Pathogenicity of local isolate virus BHV-1 as the aetiological agent of Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis in Bali Cattle Damayanti, Rini I; ., Sudarisman
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 3 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i3.447

Abstract

Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis is a disease of cattle characterised by clinical signs of the upper respiratory tract, reproductive tract and nervous system. A study to define the pathogenicity of four BHV-1 local isolates has been conducted. Fourteen Bali cattle that were free of BHV-1 has been selected and divided into four treatment groups. Each group of three was infected with virus isolate I, II, III and IV respectively with approximately a dose of 108TCID50 /10 ml and two cattle were used as control animals. Isolate I and III were originated from semen from IBR positive bulls number G 867 and G 148 respectively whereas isolate II was collected from vaginal mucosa and isolate IV was from nasal mucosa of IBR positive cattle treated with dexamethasone. Clinical response, gross-pathological and histopathological changes were observed. Immunohistochemical staining was applied to detect the antigen in tissue section. The results show that the BHV-1 local isolates could produce IBR syndrome namely fever and changes in the respiratory and reproductive tracts even though the clinical responses seemed to be disappeared by 21 days PI. Grossly there were hyperaemic nasal and vaginal mucosa and pneumonia whereas histologically there were non suppurative rhinitis, tracheitis, pneumonia and vulvovaginitis. Immunohistochemically the antigen was detected in the nasal concha and trachea. Dexamethasone treatment at 60-64 days PI could produce less severe clinical features and the second necroppsy at 69 days PI also results in less severe pathological responses. The findings also suggest that the pathogenicity of BHV-1 local isolates were as follows: isolates I, II, IV and III.     Key Words: Pathogenicity, BHV-1, Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis (IBR), Bali Cattle
Aflatoxin contamination in feeds and feed ingredients from Lampung and East Java provinces Bahri, Sjamsul; Maryam, R; Widiastuti, R
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 3 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i3.448

Abstract

In the last few years, poultry industries (broiler and laying hens) in Indonesia are faced on several problems, vaccination for instance, which suspected relate to highly-contaminated aflatoxins in feeds. The aim of this study is to give recent information on aflatoxin contamination in feeds, feed ingredients, and foods originated from some districts in Lampung and East Java provinces. The results of the study indicated that the percentage of aflatoxin B1 contamination in corn, commercial feeds, and peanuts in Lampung were 86.7, 70.0 and 80.0% with the average levels of 31.5, 13.5 and 32.2 μg/kg, respectively. Low levels of the other aflatoxins (AFB2, AFG1, and AFG2) were also detected in the samples. The highest percentage of aflatoxin contamination was found in samples from retailer (100%), followed by samples from traditional markets (91.7%), poultry shops (76.9), and a feed company (33.3%). The average levels of aflatoxin found were 58.8, 34.3, 17.8 and 2.9 μg/kg, respectively. In East Java, AFB1 was detected in all samples (corn, rice bran, concentrate and commercial feeds) on the average levels of 25.4, 69.7, 134.2 and 30.7 μg/kg respectively. The levels of AFG1 on the samples from East Java were much more higher than those of from Lampung, as well as the percentage.     Key Words: Aflatoxins, Feed, Feed Ingredients, Lampung, East Java
Organophosphate poisoning in Ongole cattle in Sukamandi Sani, Yulvian; ., Indraningsih
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 3 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i3.449

Abstract

An integrated farming system between rice and beef cattle was initiated in 2000 in Sukamandi, West Java. However, since 2002 some cattle were suffering from neurological and ophthamological signs, and some of them were found dead after consuming rice straws. Field studies showed that 6 out of 12 cattle were suffered from eye disorders such as blindness, corneal opacity and sereous lacrimation. Two of 6 cattle were severely affected. But, neurological signs were not found during field observation. Pesticide analysis in rice straws shows that both groups of pesticide, organochlorines (OP) and organophosphates (OP) were detected. Residues of OC were higher than OP as shown as 14.41 vs 2.84 ppm (before processing) for OC and 1.80 vs 0.0003 ppm (processed) for OP consisting aldrin, lindane, dieldrin, endosulfan and chlorpyrifos methyl. There was only OC detected in sera consisting lindane (0.6–37.6 ppb); heptachlor (0.03–4.4 ppb); and aldrin (0.8–20.4 ppb) with an average total of 21,4 ppb. The neurological and ophthalmological signs were suspected to be due to organophosphates (OPs) contaminated-rice straws and any other factors such as insufficient vitamin A, magnesium and calcium. Feed replacement with fresh grasses for two cattle reduced corneal changes. Similar symptoms were also reproduced in Wistar rats dosed intraperitoneally with chlorpyriphos methyl. Clinical signs included incoordination, cachexia, eye disorder and corneal opacity. Necropsy showed hepatic injury (hepatic necrosis, mottling of hepatic surface and pale); pale kidneys; swollen of spleen and hyperaemic brain. Microscopic changes were found in brain, liver and eyes. Hepatic changes included haemorrhages, centrolobular hepatic necrosis and focal coagulative necrosis. Brains were showing focal necrosis, haemorrhages, vacuolisation, neuronal necrosis, chromatolysis and nucleolysis. Eyes appeared to have necrosis of tunica muscularis, haemorrhages and eosinophilic infiltration. The study indicates that organophosphates contamination in rice straws as animal feed may lead chronic neurological and ophthalmological symptoms.     Key Words: Contamination, Pathology, Organophosphates, Rice Straws, Cattle
Mutation detection on isotype-1 β tubulin genes of Haemonchus contortus resistant strain to benzimidazole using single strand conformation polymorphism Haryuningtyas, Dyah
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 3 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i3.444

Abstract

Evidence of anthelmintic resistance of Haemonchus contortus to benzimidazole groups based on Larval development assay (LDA) and Fecal egg count reduction test (FECRT) test has been reported in some areas in Indonesia. Studies on sheep parasite H. contortus have shown that resistance to benzimidazole drugs is correlated with selection for individuals in the population possesing a spesific isotype-1 β tubulin gene. The aim of this study was to determine mutation on central part of isotype-1 β tubulin gene of benzimidazole resistant strain H. contortus using Single Strand Conformation Polymorphism (SSCP). H. contortus worms were isolated from four sheep from two government farms that resistance to benzimidazole have been occurred (SPTD Trijaya, Kuningan, West Java and UPTD Pelayanan Kesehatan Hewan, Bantul, Yogyakarta) and one sheep that susceptible from Cicurug, Bogor, West Java as a kontrol. Resistance status to benzimidazole was reexamined individually with LDA and FECRT before sheep slaughtered. DNA was extracted from female H. contortus worms. A fragment of 520 bp isotype- 1 β tubulin gene was amplified using Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and then analyze using SSCP. The results showed that there were polymorphism in isotype-1 β tubulin gene among H. contortus susceptible (Cicurug, Bogor, Jawa Barat) and two H. contortus resistant strains from SPTD Trijaya, Kuningan, West Java and UPTD Pelayanan Kesehatan Hewan, Bantul, Yogyakarta. Mutation occurred in the different nucleotide of the two resistant strain.     Key Words: Haemonchus contortus, Benzimidazole, Isotype-1 β tubulin gene, SSCP

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