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Ahmadi Riyanto
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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 22 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 10, No 2 (2005)" : 22 Documents clear
The effect of aloe vera bioactive level as feed additive on the egg performances of laying hens Bintang, I.A.K; Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 2 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i2.459

Abstract

A study on the use of aloe vera bioactives as feed additive in layer ration was conducted. One hundred and twenty pullets strain Isa Brown were allocated into 5 treatments with 6 replicates and 4 birds/replicate. The treatments were: control,control+antibiotic (50 ppm zinc bacitracin), and control+ aloe vera at three levels (0.25; 0.50 and 1.00 g/kg). The treatments were conducted in a completely randomized design. Parameter measured were first initial body weight, age at 1st lay, feed intake, egg weight, hen day (%HD) and feed conversion ratio. The results showed that antibiotic and aloe vera used as additive for 9 months production did not significantly (P<0.05) affect all parameter measured, except feed intake of hens fed diet containing 0.5 g/kg aloe vera was significantly (P<0.05) higher than control. The addition of aloe vera at 1.0 g/kg significantly (P<0.05) reduced the feed intake as compared with the control, aloe vera 0.25 and 0.50 g/kg. The used of aloe vera (1.00 g/kg) produced egg weight significantly (P<0.05) higher than the control, and feed conversion ratio was significantly (P<0.05) better than the control and aloe vera (0.25 g/kg). It is concluded that the best treatment was the diet with aloe vera level at 1.00 g/kg. This treatment improved feed efficiency 8.40%.     Key Words: Bioactive, Egg Production, Layer
The change of nutritional value of the fermented Eichhornia crassipes Mart meal as broiler rations Mahmilia, Fera
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 2 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i2.460

Abstract

Eichhornia crassipes Mart is one of the water plants which grows in the rivers, ricefields, water reservoirs or dams. This plant is often considered as water weeds that harm people much. This weed can be used for feeding the animal, but it has high crude fiber. Fermentation tehnology could be done to overcome the problem. E. crassipes Mart is grounded into meal and solidly fermented by mixing minerals and Trichoderma harzianum for 4 days at room temperature. The fermentation resulted the increase of nutritional value. The crude protein increases for 61.81% (from 6.31 to 10.21%) and crude fiber decreases for 18% (26.61 to 21.82%). The in vivo experiment was conducted based on completely randomized design using 80 day old broiler chicks with 5 replication. They were alotted to 4 diets containing one control without fermented E. crassipes Mart, 5, 10 and 15% of fermented E. crassipes Mart. Diets were fed ad libitum for 6 weeks. Feed intake, weight gain and feed conversion ratio, carcas and abdominal fat were observed as parameters. Result showed that no parameter were significantly affected by treatments, although the nutritional values were slightly decreasing in higher fermented E. crassipes. The fermented E. Crassipes Mart can be used up to 15% in broiler rations.     Key Words: Eichhornia crassipes Mart Meal, Nutritional Value, Fermentation, Ration
Moulting patterns of Alabio and Mojosari ducks and their relation on blood lipids (tryglycerides), egg production and egg quality Purba, Maijon; Hardjosworo, P.S; Prasetyo, L.H; Ekastuti, D.R
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 2 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i2.461

Abstract

Moulting is a biological condition that can happen in poultry. It is resulted from the complex interaction which involves the function of thyroxine hormone. Moulting can reduce or even stop the egg production. A study was conducted to observe the moulting patterns of local ducks (Alabio and Mojosari) and to determine the relation of moulting with blood lipids (triglycerides), egg production and quality. Each breed consisted of ten female dukcs were observed for moulting pattern, blood triglycerides, egg production and quality. Fourty ducks were used for simulation of egg production. Data from moulting patterns,egg production and quality were analyzed using t-based on Least Square means with Statistical Analysis System. The relation of breeds and moulting patterns with triglycerides were analyzed using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) for a completely randomized design in a factorial arrangement of 2x2. The main factor was kind of breeds, while the subfactor was the period of moulting, before and during moulting. There were not interaction in every variables between both factors. The average moulting periode of Alabio was significantly (P<0.05) shorter than that of Mojosari (69 vs 76 days). There were 40% of Alabio ducks moulting for 61-70 days, while 40% of Mojosari ducks moulting for 71-80 days. Egg production of Alabio ducks before and after moulting were higher than those Mojosari ducks. The triglycerides content of Alabio and Mojosari ducks was decreased during moulting, in Alabio ducks they were 32.02 and 27.64 μg/ml before and during moulting, while in Mojosari ducks they were 32.83 and 29.32 μg/ml respectively. Egg weight, albumin weight, yolk weight, and haugh unit of the two breeds increased after moulting, while yolk colour decreased. The average yolk colour of Alabio ducks before and after moulting were 6.90 and 5.11, while in Mojosari ducks they were 7.90 and 4.60 respectively.     Key Words: Moulting, Tryglycerides, Egg Productivity, Egg Quality
Conformation and component parts of the carcass of Philippine native goat Tambunan, Reny Debora; Roxas, N.P; Pamungkas, D
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 2 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i2.463

Abstract

Only limited work has been done to assess the potential of Philippines native goat in terms of conformation and component parts of the carcass. Thus, an experiment has been conducted at Institute of Animal Science, University of the Philippines  os Baños, Philippines to determine carcass and lean-fat-bone yield of different cuts of chevon from Philippine native goat.  Result showed that among the wholesale cuts of chevon, shoulder had significantly higher separable lean content (8.80% of LW) than leg, loin, rib, and neck. Based on % wholesale cuts (WC), however, the leg had significantly higher value (69.18%) than the other chevon cuts. Loin had significantly higher separable fat (1.67% of LW) than the other chevon cuts. Shoulder had significantly higher separable bone (4.62% of LW). Based on %WC, however, rib had significantly higher separable bone (53.36%) than the other cuts. The shoulder had significantly higher boneless recovery (9.39% of LW) than other chevon cuts.     Key Words: Chevon, Carcass, Live Weight, Wholesale Cut
Protective value of immune responses developed in goats vaccinated with insoluble proteins from Sarcoptes Scabiei Tarigan, Simson
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 2 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i2.464

Abstract

Vaccines developed from certain membrane proteins lining the lumen of arthropod’s gut have been demonstrated effective in the control of some arthropod ectoparasites. A similar approach could also be applied to Sarcoptes scabiei since this parasite also ingests its host immunoglobulins. To evaluate immune protection of the membrane proteins, insoluble mite proteins were fractionated by successive treatment in the solutions of 1.14 M NaCl, 2% SB 3-14 Zwitterion detergent, 6 M urea, 6 M guanidine-HCl and 5% SDS. Five groups of goats (6 or 7 goats per group) were immunised respectively with the protein fractions. Vaccination was performed 6 times, each with a dosage of 250 μg proteins, and 3 week intervals between vaccination. Group 6 (7 goats) received PBS and adjuvant only, and served as an unvaccinated control. One week after the last vaccination, all goats were challenged with 2000 live mites on the auricles. The development of lesions were examined at 1 day, 2 days, and then every week from week 1 to 8. All animals were bled and weighed every week, and at the end of the experiment, skin scrapings were collected to determine the mite burden. Antibody responses induced by vaccination and challenge were examined by ELISA and Western blotting. This experiment showed that vaccination with the insoluble-protein fractions resulted in the development of high level of specific antibodies but the responses did not have any protective value. The severity of lesions and mite burden in the vaccinated animals were not different from those in the unvaccinated control.     Key Words: Sarcoptes scabiei, Insoluble Protein, Goat, Vaccination
Molecular characterization of Indonesia avian influenza virus Dharmayanti, N.L.P.I.; Damayanti, R; Indriani, R; Wiyono, A; Adjid, R.M.A.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 2 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i2.465

Abstract

Avian influenza outbreaks in poultry have been reported in Java island since August 2003. A total of 14 isolates of avian influenza virus has been isolated from October 2003 to October 2004. The viruses have been identified as HPAI H5N1 subtype. All of them were characterized further at genetic level and also for their pathogenicity. Phylogenetic analysis showed all of the avian influenza virus isolates were closely related to avian influenza virus from China (A/Duck/China/E319-2/03(H5N1). Molecular basis of pathogenicity in HA cleavage site indicated that the isolates of avian influenza virus have multiple basic amino acid (B-X-B-R) indicating that all of the isolates representing virulent avian influenza virus (highly pathogenic avian influenza virus).     Key Words: Avian Influenza Virus, Molecular Characterization, Poultry, Indonesia
The effectivity of Annona squamosa L seeds extracted by diverse organic solvents: water, methanol and hexane against mortality of tick larvae, Boophilus microplus in vitro Wardhana, April H; Husein, Amir; Manurung, J
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 2 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i2.466

Abstract

Boophilus microplus is the most important pest in livestock industries. The use of synthetic chemical acaricides is the main method of tick control, however, chemical acaricides are expensive, and they are harmful to environment and cause strain resistance. The aim of study was to investigate the affectivity of Annona squamosa L seeds extracted by diverse organic solvents such as water, methanol and hexane against mortality of Boophilus microplus larvae in vitro. Five hundred and fifty larvae were used in this study and divided into three groups e.g. water (3, 4 and 5% concentration), methanol and hexane extract groups (0.25, 0.50, and 0.75% concentration). Coumaphos (0.50%) was used as a positive control. The larvae were dipped into extract solution for 10 seconds and dried using filter paper. Their mortality was observed from one to five hours. The mortality data were transformed to Abbot formula and analyzed using probit analysis with 95% significant level. This study showed that the active compound of Annona squamosa L seeds had effectively contact toxic property for B. microplus larvae at 5, 0.50, and 0.75% for water, methanol and hexane extractions, respectively. The lethal concentrations of methanol extract (LC50, LC90, and LC95) were lower than hexane extract e.g. 0.32, 0.86, and 1.13%, respectively and for hexane extract were 0.35, 1.11, and 1.54%, respectively at fifth hour. The lethal times of methanol extract on 0.50% concentration were shorter than hexane extract e.g. 3.12 hours (LT50), 5.86 hours (LT90), and 7.00 hours (LT95) and for hexane extract on 0.75% concentration were 3.26 hours (LT50), 6.21 hours (LT90), and 7.45 hours (LT95). Water extract of 5% concentration was effective for traditional farmer in rural area due to easy and cheap method. The lethal concentrations of water extract on fifth hour were 2.02% (LC50), 4.00% (LC90), and 4.85% (LC95) and the lethal time on 5% concentration were 2.54 hours (LT50), 4.13 hours (LT90), and 4.75 hours (LT95).     Key Words: Annona squamosa, Boophilus microplus, Water Extract, Methanol, Hexane
Development of serological technique for examination of aspergillosis in chicken Gholib, Djaenudin
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 2 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i2.467

Abstract

Aspergillosis detection by using serological method has not been reported in Indonesia. In this case, a study was conducted, by using mycelium extract of A. fumigatus as the antigen. Rabbits and chickens were injected with the antigen to produce positive serum (antiserum). The antigen and antiserum were tested serologicaly by Immunodiffusion/Agar Gel Precipitation (AGP), ELISA and Immunoblot. Chicken serum of broiler and layer collected from field were also included in the test. All positive serum of the experimentally animals gave positive results with all methods of serological tests. No bands of precipitation reaction in AGP test with chicken serum from the field. Both chicken and rabbit positive serum with ELISA test showed high Optical Density (OD), while field chicken serum from broiler commonly gave lower OD compared to layer. Immunoblot test of chicken positive serum showed bands of reaction with the antigen in nitrocellulose membrane, approximately on 33, 38, 44, 52, 70, 77, 97, and 110 kDa, meanwhile field chicken serum with high OD in ELISA test, showed bands approximately on 16, 18, 33, 38, 44, 47, 52, 70, 77, 84, 97, and 110 kDa. It means that the field chicken serum contain immunoglobulin molecules has spesific antibody of aspergillus antigen. It is concluded that the ELISA test can be used for screening on chicken aspergillosis in serological methode.     Key Words: Antigen, Aspergillus fumigatus, Serology, Chicken
Natural infection of malignant catarrhal fever in Bali cattle: A case study Damayanti, R; Wiyono, A
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 2 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i2.468

Abstract

Malignant catarrhal fever in Indonesia is caused by Ovine herpes virus 2 and considered as a disease with high mortality rate causing degeneratif and lymphoproliferative disease in cattle, buffalo and other ruminants. A total number of fifteen Bali cattle were naturally infected by Malignant Catarrhal Fever (MCF). Those cattle were meant to be experimental animals of research on infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR), Septicaemia epizootica (SE), and bovine brucellosis. The clinical signs of those animals were sudden high fever, depression, anorexia, corneal opacity, mucopurulent oculo-nasal discharges and diarrhoea. Six of them were dead and the remaining cattle were slaughtered at extremis. On the basis of clinical, gross-pathological and histopathological findings, all cases were shown to be consistent and pathognomonic of MCF cases. These cases were regarded as an outbreak of MCF affecting Bali cattle which occurred during wet season and while in other paddock in that area there were a number of lambing sheep. This result confirms that Bali cattle is a very susceptible animal of MCF and the cases were very likely due to the spread of MCF virus from lambing sheep.     Key Words: Malignant Catarrhal Fever, Bali Cattle, Natural Infection, Pathology
The effect of aflatoxins B1 (AFB1) on chick embryo Bahri, Sjamsul; Widiastuti, R; Mustikaningsih, Y
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 2 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i2.469

Abstract

Aflatoxins are toxic compounds which occurred in cereals especially low qualities corn and peanuts. Aflatoxins are mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic. The presence of aflatoxin in food including derived food in Indonesia had been observed, however, the observation on its toxicity effect is still limited. This research was conducted to study the effect of innoculation of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) on the development of embryonic chicken egg, mortality and hatchability. The AFB1 was innoculated 10 μl in each 5 days age embryonic egg through air sacs dosaged 0; 15,6; 31,2; 62,5; 125 and 250 ng. The results showed that hatchability of those embryos were 66, 28, 26, 16, 0 and 0% respectively for 0; 15,6; 31,2; 62,5; 125 and 250 ng innoculation of AFB1. Innoculation of AFB1 caused malformation of the embryos, malabsorbtion of the yolk egg. The weight of hatched eggs was not significantly different in each group, eventhough there was a tendency that high AFB1 innoculation will decreased the live weight.     Key Words: Aflatoxin B1, Toxicity, Chick Embryo

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