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Contact Name
Ahmadi Riyanto
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medpub@litbang.deptan.go.id
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ahmadi_puslitbangnak@yahoo.com
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Kota bogor,
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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
JITV (Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Science),  ISSN: 0853-7380 E-ISSN: 2252-696X is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal published by Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD). The aim of this journal is to publish high-quality articles dedicated to all aspects of the latest outstanding developments in the field of animal and veterinary science. It was first published in 1995. The journal has been registered in the CrossRef system with Digital Object Identifier (DOI) prefix 10.14334.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 22 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 10, No 1 (2005)" : 22 Documents clear
The effect of application of tea waste (Camellia sinensis) fermented with Aspergillus niger on broiler Krisnan, Rantan
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 1 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i1.470

Abstract

The purpose of this experiment is to find out the effect of Aspergillus niger fermented tea waste (Camellia sinensis) in feed on body weight gain, protein efficiency and percentage of carcass of broiler. The experiment was conducted in a Completely Randomized Design using 100 day old chicks (DOC) Avian CP-707 strain. The animal were devided into five treatments of ration. Each treatment was replicated four times. All dietary treatment were formulated based on fermented tea-waste content, namely: RO (0.0%), R1 (2.5%), R2 (5.0%), R3 (7.5%), and R4 (10.0%). The results indicated that broilers gave the best responses to the R1 (2.5% fermented tea-waste) to all measured parameters. Positive responses also observed in broilers given ration containing fermented tea-waste up to the level 7.5%, however, at the level 10.0% decreased body weight gain, but the protein efficiency and the carcass percentage were equal to the R0 (control ration).   Key Words: Fermented Tea-Waste, Body Weight Gain, Protein Efficiency, Carcass, Broiler
Expression of recessive homozygote gene (c/c) on the quality of first eggs in Mojosari duck Suparyanto, Agus
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 1 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i1.471

Abstract

Recessive homozygote gene (c/c) in poultry is usually expressed in white plumage, and thought to affect growth and egg production. This effect is still under discussion because can be positive or negative. In order to study further the expression of the recessive gene on Mojosari duck this study was aimed to investigate the quality of first eggs from ducks with brown and white plumage. The result showed that weight of first eggs of ducks with dominant gene (C/c), was 52.91 g higher than that of duck with homozygote recessive gene (c/c) which 51.43 g. For other variable, there was no significant different between ducks with dominant gene (C/c) and with recessive gene (c/c), i.e. weight of egg yolk (14.99 vs. 14.94 g), weight of egg white (31.34 vs. 29.94 g) weight of wet shell (6.62 vs. 6.56 g) and thickness (0.36 vs. 0.34). However there was significant different between the two group for score of Haugh Unit (89.67 vs. 101.12) and egg yolk color (7.30 vs. 5.35). It is obvious that the expression of the recessive homozygote gene (c/c) did not give any significant difference to the quality of first egg, except for the color which need to the confirmed with more and longer observations.       Key Words: Recessive Gene, First Eggs, White Mojosari Duck
The Effect of sheep serum and estrus sheep serum on in vitro maturation and fertility rate of ewe oocyte Wattimena, J; Veerman, M
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 1 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i1.472

Abstract

The main objective of this research was to obtain the effect of sheep serum (SS) and estrus sheep serum (ESS) on in vitro maturation oocyte and ovine fertilization. This study was carried out in experimental laboratory in animal reproduction laboratory, Faculty of Animal Husbandry, Padjadjaran University. Results showed that treatments significantly (P<0,05) influenced on maturation rate for germinal vesicle (GV), germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), metaphase-I (M-I) and metaphase-II (M-II), but no significantly (P>0.05) results observed on ovine in vitro fertilization (1, 2 and >2 pronuclei). Concentration of 10-20% ESS in CR1aa media were significantly (P<0,05) better than that of SS on maturation rate of ovine oocyte.       Key Words: Sheep Serum, Estrus Sheep Serum, Maturation, Fertilization
Relative superiority analysis of Garut dam and its crossbred Inounu, I; ., Subandriyo; Tiesnamurti, B; Hidajati, N; Nafiu, La Ode
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 1 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i1.473

Abstract

In attemp to increase the productivity of Garut sheep, Indonesian Research Institute for Animal Production has crossed Garut sheep (GG) with St. Croix sheep (HH) that has high frame body size and adaptable to the hot climate (in 1995) and with Moulton Charollais sheep (MM) that has high body weight gain and good milk production to raise multiple birth (in 1996). The objective of this research was to evaluate the ewe productivity of Garut sheep and its crosses with St. Croix and Moulton Charollais. This research was conducted at Animal Research Station, Bogor from 1995 to 2002. In this study the crossing was done using frozen semen of M. Charollais and ram of St. Croix so that the real performance of these sheep under Indonesian condition is not known. So that the relative superiority of these crosses is calculated from the percentage of the differences between traits mean of crossbred and purebred divided by trait means of purebred Garut, except for the threeway crosses (MHG and HMG) is calculated from the difference between the means of threeway crossbred trait with the means of two parents (MG and HG). It is concluded that HG and MHG show higher dam productivity than GG, it can be seen from their litter weight at birth and weaning. In poor feed condition GG showed higher productivity than the crossbred sheep (MG and HG), but MHG/MHG showed higher relative superiority compare to their parents (MG and HG). In good feed condition HG and MHG/HMG sheep showed higher productivity than Garut sheep. The relative superiority of HG sheep is 26.40% over GG and for MHG/HMG is 11.24% over their parents (MG and HG).       Key Words: Garut Sheep, St. Croix Sheep, M. Charollais Sheep, Relative Superiority
Microbes of fermented kefir-like using combination of kefir grains and Bifidobacterium longum Usmiati, Sri; Ram, Rarah
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 1 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i1.474

Abstract

The objectives of research were to find out physico-chemical characters and to detect flavor volatile compound of kefir-like. Material used was skim milk TS 9.5% which was heated at 85oC for 30 minutes and cooled at 22oC before innoculation of the starter. Microorganisms used were (a) Lactobacillus acidophilus P155110, (b) Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. Bulgaricus NCIMB 11778, (c) Lactococcus lactis P155610, (d) Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum NCIMB 3350, (e) Acetobacter aceti P154810, (f) Bifidobacterium longum BF1, and (g) Saccharomyces cerevisiae P156252. The treatments consist of P1 = without (b); P2 = without (a); and P3= used (a) until (g). The physico-chemical characters identified were lactic acid and lactose percentages, pH, viscosity, organoleptic test for intensity of kefir-like sensory attributes. Results indicated that B. longum was potential bacterium use for starter combination on kefir-like making. The use starter P1 combination has high acidity and viscosity, low pH and lactose percentage, and high intensity on attribute creamy-white color, soft and curdle consistency, and kefir specific aroma on kefir-like. Volatile compound acid group were dominate by high acidity character on kefir-like resulted from starter P1 combination. Compound of 3-hydroxi-2-butanone (acetoin) was affecting butter-like of P3 character. This compound resulted from which is a character of fermented milk flavor was not detected on P1 kefir-like.     Key Words: Fermented Milk Kefir-Like, Volatile Compound, Physicochemical Character, Bifidobacterium longum
Ingestion of host immunoglobulin by Sarcoptes scabiei Tarigan, Simson
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 1 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i1.475

Abstract

Scabies is one of the most important diseases in human and veterinary medicine. The available control measures that rely on acaricides are unsustainable, costly and environmentally unfriendly. Vaccination which is supposedly the most attractive alternative control, is sustainable, potentially cheap and environmentally friendly. Recent development in protein biochemistry and recombinant technology have facilitated the development of anti-parasite vaccine which in the past was impossible. One prerequisite for the anti-parasite-vaccine development is that the parasite has to ingest its host immunoglobulin. This study, therefore, was designed to determine whether Sarcoptes scabiei, a non blood-feeding parasite that resides on the avascular cornified layer of the skin, ingest its host immunoglobulin. Sections of routinely processed mites and skin from a mangy goat were probed with peroxidase-conjugated-anti-goat IgG and the immune complex was visualised with diaminobenzidine solution. To determine whether the ingested IgG was still intact or had been fragmented by the proteolytic enzymes, immunoblotting analysis of SDS-PAGE- fractionated proteins extracted from washed mites was performed. Quantification of IgG was done byan Elisa using purified goat IgG as control. This study showed that IgG in the mites confined to the mite’s gut only, and only a fraction of mite population ingested the IgG. The ingested IgG, as shown by immunoblot analysis, was mostly still intact. This study indicates that development of anti-scabies vaccines is reasonable.     Key Words: Sarcoptes scabiei, Immunoglobulin
Identification of volatile compounds from myiasis wounds and its responsesfor Chrysomya bezziana Wardhana, April H; ., Sukarsih; Urech, R
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 1 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i1.476

Abstract

Development of attractant for screwworm fly was required in myiasis control on livestock. The purpose of this study is to identify of volatile compounds from myiasis wound infested with Chrysomya bezziana larvae including to assess their responses in both cage and room assays. Both Friesian-Holstein heifer (FH) (animal 1) and Bali cattle (animal 2) were used as myiasis model. The artificial wounds (8-10 cm) were conducted on the rump of both animals and infested with about 200 eggs of C.bezziana. Odours from the infested wound were collected on day 1 and 3 for animal1 and day 3 and 5 for animal 2, post C. bezziana larvae infestation. Two different collection devices were used: firstly, absorption onto Tenax kept in steel tubes, whichwas attached to a collected bowl. The volatile organic compounds were collected from the wound and the surrounding animal hide by flowins the air through the inlet and outlet. Secondly, a solid phase micro extraction (SPME) device was inserted into bowl with passive (no air flow) odour collection. Gass chromatography/mass spectrometry was used to identify volatile compounds from wound. The compounds of the wound on animal 1, collected on day 1, produced only minor quantities of compounds (nonanal, decanal, hexanal and heptanal). Minor components such as DMDS and DMTS were only detected on day 3. The compounds of the wound on animal 2 was more varied and had a peculiar strike-like smell on day 3 and 5. They included indole, phenol, acetone, various sulfides (DMS, DMDS, DMTS), alcohols (butanol, 3-methylbutanol), aldehydes and acids. These compounds were selected and formulated into attractant (B92) then tested in both cage and room assays using SL-2 as control. Respond of flies was analyzed by ANOVA 5% (cage assay) and T test 5% (room assay). The result showed that the fly response to B92 was very low compared to SL-2 in cage assays (P<0.05). The addition of B92 to SL-2 could not increase the catch of flies in the cage assays (SL-2+B92=10:1; 10:3), there was no difference between SL-2 and B92/SL-2 in room assay, the fly response still low (P>0.05).     Key Words: Volatile Compound, Myiasis, Wound, Chrysomya bezziana
Pathogenicity study of local bluetongue virus isolates in local and imported sheep Sendow, Indrawati
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 1 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i1.477

Abstract

Bluetongue is one of arboviruses that caused economical impact to sheep farmers. Six local bluetongue virus (BT) serotypes isolates were obtained from sentinel cattle blood in West Java and Irian Jaya (Papua), but its pathogenicity has not been identified. Propagation of viraemic blood inoculum from 3 local BT serotypes such as serotypes 1,9 and 21, that had been conducted in Merino sheep, will be used for pathogenicity study. The study was devided into 3 groups, each group contained local and imported sheep as control and infected sheep. All sheep had been tested as negative BT antibodies. Observation on clinical signs had been conducted twice daily for 28 days. Heparinised blood and sera were collected everyday to obtain the viraemia period by Ag-C-ELISA test and antibody respons by C-ELISA test. The clinical signs produced were varied from normal to very mild in local sheep and very mild to mild-moderate in Merino sheep.The lowest severe degree of clinical signs was BT 9 followed by BT 1 and BT 21. No dead, neither local and Merino sheep occurred. Viraemia in Merino sheep occurred between 3-5 days and in local sheep between 4-7 days post inoculation (DPI). Antibody respons occurred as quick as 10 DPI in Merino sheep and 9 DPI in local sheep, and stayed until the end of experiment. This study showed that local BT isolates were not pathogen and not producing clasical BT infection.     Key Words: Bluetongue Virus, Antibody Respons, Viraemia, Serology, Sheep
The macroscopic and microscopic patology changes on broiler infected with local reovirus isolate Wahyuwardani, Sutiastuti; Huminto, Hernomoadi; Parede, Lies
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 1 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i1.478

Abstract

Local reovirus isolate is the virus which could be isolated from runting and stunting syndrome. The ability of local reovirus isolate to induce runting and stunting syndrome in broilers chicken was investigated. The day old chicks (doc) were infected with local reovirus isolate assessed clinically and pathologically at 1, 2 and 3 weeks post inoculation. A total of 40 DOC were divided into two groups. The first group (20 doc) was orally infected with ± 2 x 103 local reovirus isolate particle and the other used as negative control group. The results showed that the isolate caused wet droppings, stunting, enteritis, pancreatitis, malabsorbtion, bursal atrophy and spleenic hypertrophy, which similar to runting and stunting syndrome (RSS) disease in chicken. The body weight was reduced to 14.7% on the inoculated group at 4 weeks post inoculation.     Key Words: Broiler, Local Reovirus Isolate, Runting and Stunting, Malabsorption
Utilization of probiotics for controlling clostridial necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens Natalia, Lily; Priadi, Adin
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 10, No 1 (2005)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i1.479

Abstract

Clostridial necrotic enteritis (CNE) is a common disease among rapidly growing broiler chickens. The purpose of this trial was to study the utilisation of probiotics in controlling experimental CNE in broiler chickens. Chicken normal gut bacterial flora (mucosal starter culture selective/MCS) was used as a competitive exclusion treatment in broiler chicken and its influence to the occurence of clostridial necrotic enteritis were observed. The study comprised of 4 broiler cages treatments of probiotics (2 different dose of MCS, commercial probiotic, 1 cage untreated as control). Probiotics were given orally upon arrival. All groups were given live coccidial vaccine (as predisposing factor for CNE) and challenged with 108 Clostridium perfringens tipe A and C spores on day 10 and 12. The results showed that the probiotics could reduced the incidence and severity of CNE after challenge and improved the performance of chickens treated. Untreated group showed 40% of the mortality due to CNE, and 30% of the chicken showed subclinical necrotic enteritis (SNE).     Key Words: Clostridial Necrotic Enteritis, Probiotics, Broiler Chickeni

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