Pelita Perkebunan (Coffee and Cocoa Research Journal)
ISSN : 02150212     EISSN : 24069574
Pelita Perkebunan, Coffee and Cocoa Research Journal (CCRJ): ISSN:0215-0212 Since its establishment in 1911, Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute (ICCRI) formerly Besoekisch Proefstation, had published its research findings through a journal call Mededelingen van het Besoekisch Proefstation. Between 1948-1981 the research institute was under the supervision of Bogor Research Institute for Estate Crops, and published its research findings through De Bergcultures which was later changed to Menara Perkebunan. Since the institute held the national mandate for coffee and cocoa commodities, and due to rapid increase in the research findings, ICCRI published its first issue of Pelita Perkebunanjournal in April 1985. Pelita Perkebunanis an international journal providing rapid publication of peer-reviewed articles concerned with coffee and cocoa commodities based on the aspects of agronomy, plant breeding, soil science, crop protection, postharvest technology and social economy. Papers dealing with result of original research on the above aspects are welcome, with no page charge. Pelita Perkebunan is managed by Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute (ICCRI), which publish the research findings not only for coffee and cocoa but also other commodities relevant with coffee and cocoa, i.e. shade trees, intercrops and wind breakers.
Articles 5 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 22, No 2 (2006)" : 5 Documents clear
The side effect of Paecilomyces fumosoroseusapplication on the black ant, Dolichoderus thoracicus, the predator of Helopeltis antoniiand cocoa pod borer Sulistyowai, Endang; Mufrihati, Endang; Andayani, Bekti
Pelita Perkebunan (Coffee and Cocoa Research Journal) Vol 22, No 2 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute

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Abstract

Paecilomyces fumosoroseuswas known as one of the effective biological agents of cocoa pod borer and Helopeltis antonii. To find out the side effect of application of P. fumosoroseuson black ant, Dolichoderus thoracicus, a series of observations were carried out at the Laboratory of Pest and Diseases Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute (ICCRI) and in a cocoa plantation of Glenmore, Banyuwangi district, since June until October, 2004. Laboratory research used four concentrations of P. fumosoroseusnamely 105, 106, 107 and 108 spores/ml, while in the field used concentration 2, 4, 6, 8 g dry spores/ml. Each trial as compared with spraying of carbamate and synthetic pyrethroid insecticides as control and untreated This research was designed by randomized block design and four replications. The results showed that in the laboratory, direct spraying suspension of P. fumosoroseuskilled black ant between 20—39% which infected fungi about 2.5—12.5%. The relationship between log of spores concentration of P. fumosoroseus and probit of ant mortality followed the regression equation Y = 3.653 + 0.097 X with LC 50 was 8 x 10 13 spore/ml. The period needed to kill a half of ant population at the laboratory (LT 50) at concentration 107 spores/ml followed the regression equation Y = 1.851 + 1.522 X, with LT50 is 12,01 days. The effect of pyrethroid and carbamate insecticide on ants mortality were 91.25% and 98.75% respectively. In the field, the effect of P. fumosoroseusspray on black ant population was very low, with the percentage of ant mortality at cocoa leaf nest were 0.25–0.46% and at cocoa leaf nest in plastic bag were 0.06–0.21%, while carbamate and pyrethroid synthetic effect were 37.35% and 52.37% at cocoa leaf nest, and 19.15% and 46.67% at cocoa leaf nest in plastic bags. Key words : Cocoa, capsid, Helopeltis antonii, biological control, biological agents, Paecilomyces fumosoroseus, Dolichoderus tharacicus.
Optimizing of a Horizontal Cylinder Type Cocoa Roaster for Dried Cocoa Cotyledon Roasting Widyotomo, Sukrisno; Mulato, Sri; Suharyanto, Edi
Pelita Perkebunan (Coffee and Cocoa Research Journal) Vol 22, No 2 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute

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Abstract

The secondary process of cocoa is one of the promising alternatives to increase the value added of dried cocoa beans. One the other hand, the development for secondary cocoa process requires an appropriate technology that is not available yet for small or medium scale business. Cocoa roaster is a basic equipment to produce good and competitive secondary cocoa products for chocolate industry. The Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute has, therefore, designed and tested a horizontal cylinder type roaster for drying cocoa cotyledon. The cylinder has 405 mm diameter, 520 mm long and is rotated by a 1 HP (0.75 kW), 220 V, single phase and 1400 rpm electric motor. Assisted with a gear reducer, the final cylinder rotation is adjusted at approximately 6 rpm. The heat for roasting process is generated from kerosene burner. At the end of roasting, the roasted beans are cooled down by ambient air inside a cooling platform by natural air flow. The raw material used in this optimizing test was dried fine cocoa cotyledon. Field tests showed that the optimum performance of the roaster was 7 kg dried fine cocoa cotyledon loaded with roasting temperature 120 oC and 25.57 kg/h optimum capacity. The organoleptic test showed that score of aromatic, flavour, acidity, bitterness, astringency and burnt were 4.8, 5.2, 5.4, 5.2, 4.8 and 0.8 with 10 scale, also 4.2 with 5 scale for likely. The roasting time was 15—25 minutes to get 2.5—3% final water content depend on roasting temperature and cocoa cotyledon loaded. Key words: cocoa, roasting, horizontal cylinder, quality.
Effects of Alkali Concentration and Conching Temperature on Flavour, Hardness and Colour of Chocolate Jati, Misnawi; ., Susijahadi; Selamat, Jinap; Wahyudi, Teguh; Putriani, Novrita
Pelita Perkebunan (Coffee and Cocoa Research Journal) Vol 22, No 2 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute

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Alkalization is an addition of alkali into cocoa mass to improve product quality in terms of flavour and colour appearance. Sodium bicarbonate and potassium bicarbonate are usual to be added into cocoa cotyledon prior to roasting. A study has been carried out to evaluate the effects of alkalization proceeded upon conching on chocolate sensory properties, hardness and colour. Re sponse Surface Methodology design at alkali concentrations of 1—15 g kg -1 and conching temperature of 40—80 oC have been used in the study. Parameters evaluated were sensory properties, particle size, hardness and colour. Results of the study showed that alkali concentration significantly influenced aroma, overall preference, particle size and hardness; meanwhile, conching temperature showed significant influence on aroma, taste, appearance, overall preference and texture of chocolate. Alkali concentration and conching temperature showed interactively influence on aroma and overall preference. A good quality of chocolate could be found at the alkali concentration of 8—15 g kg -1 and conching temperature of 74—80 oC. Key words: cocoa bean, chocolate, flavour, conching, alkalization, colour, particle size, texture.
Use of Trapping for Controlling of Coffee Berry Borer (Hypothenemus hampei) Wiryadiputra, Soekadar
Pelita Perkebunan (Coffee and Cocoa Research Journal) Vol 22, No 2 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute

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Abstract

Studies on the field trapping of coffee berry borer (CBB, Hypothenemus hampei) have been conducted to evaluate trap color, trap design and lures (attractant substances). The trials were conducted in a Robusta coffee plantation in East Java during August to December 2004. The trap color evaluated were red, orange, yellow, green and blue, set up in the coffee plantation using a four funnels trap. The traps installed on wood poles at a height of 175 cm above ground and placed among coffee trees. Observations were conducted every day for a week. Result of the study showed that the red and blue color traps captured CBB significantly higher than the others. During a week, the red color captured 1694 CBB adults while the blue one captured 1619 CBB adults. Peak number of captured CBB of the red and blue trapping occurred on the third day with the number of CBB of 416 and 395, respectively. In the evaluation of trapping design, four types of trapping were tried at the same location. The types of trapping were single funnel red trapping, four funnel red trapping, bottle trap with two straight opposite holes, and bottle trapping with two-zigzag holes. Bottle trapping was made of plastic bottle of 1.5-litre capacity, provided with two holes at its opposite wall. Setting up of the trapping in the field and the observation time were in the same way with the trial in trapping color evaluation. Results obtained indicated that the bottle trapping with two straight opposite holes captured the highest number of CBB followed by four funnel red trapping i.e. 547 and 69 per week, respectively. The peak number of trapped CBB occurred at the third day, as at the color trials. Furthermore, four lures have been evaluated int order to obtain the most effective substances for CBB trapping. Substances of A, B, C and D were set up in a coffee plantation using two types of trapping, four funnel red trapping and bottle trapping with two straight opposite holes. The results showed that the substances of B, C and D captured higher CBB adult than A. Nevertheless, this results was not fully convincing since the number of CBB trapped was low, which was due to low population of the CBB during the last trial. Key words: Coffee, trapping, coffee berry borer (CBB), Hypothenemus hampei, trap color, trap desain, lure
Intensity of Ground Cover Crop Arachis pintoi, Rhizobium Inoculation and Phosphorus Application and Their Effects on Field Growth and Nutrient Status of Cocoa Plants Bako Baon, John; Pudjiono, John
Pelita Perkebunan (Coffee and Cocoa Research Journal) Vol 22, No 2 (2006)
Publisher : Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute

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Abstract

Arachis pintoiis potentially as a cover crop for cocoa (Theobroma cacaoL.) farm, however information regarding its effect on the growth of cocoa plants in the field is very limited. The objective of this experiment is to investigate the combined influence of ground cover crop A. pintoi, rhizobial bacterial inoculation and phosphorus (P) fertilizer on the growth of cocoa in the field and nutrient status. This experiment laid out in split-split plot design consisted of three levels of cover crop (without, A. pintoiand Calopogonium caeruleum), two levels of rhizobium inoculation (not inoculated and inoculated) and two levels of phosphorus application (no P added and P added). The results showed that in field condition the presence of A. pintoias cover crop did not affect the growth of cocoa. On the other hand, C. caeruleumas cover crop tended to restrict cocoa growth compared to A. pintoi. Application of P increased leaf number of cocoa plant. Biomass production of A. pintoiwas 40% higher than C. caeruleum. Soil organic carbon and nitrogen contents were not affected by ground cover crops, though higher value (0.235% N and 1.63% organic C) was obtained from combined treatments of inoculation and P addition or neither inoculation nor P addition. In the case of no rhizobium inoculation, soil N content in cocoa farm with A. pintoicover crop was lower than that of without cover crop or with C. caeruleum. Cover crop increased plant N content when there was no inoculation, on the other hand rhizobium inoculation decreased N content of cocoa tissue. Tissue P content of cocoa plant was not influenced by A. Pintoicover crop or by rhizobium inoculation, except that the P tissue content of cocoa was 28% higher when the cover crop was C. caeruleumand inoculated. Key words : Arachis pintoi, Theobroma cacao, Calopogonium caeruleum, rhizobium, nitrogen, phosphorus.

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