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Journal of Dentistry Indonesia
Published by Universitas Indonesia
Journal of Dentistry Indonesia (JDI) is a scientific journal that is published three times annually (April, August and December). This journal aims for continuous dissemination of updates in relation to dentistry and its related fields in the form of original articles, case reports and reviews. Its first publication was in 1993, under the name of Jurnal Kedokteran Gigi Universitas Indonesia, published by the Faculty of Dentistry Universitas Indonesia. At the end of 2012, this journal collaborated with the Indonesian Dental Association for its publication. All submitted manuscripts are subjected for double-blind peer review and editorial review processes before being granted acceptance. Starting in 2012, articles published in JDI could be freely available online from the Journal’s official website and is indexed in Google Scholar. Papers would be available online shortly after granted acceptance from the JDI as the hardcopy is being printed. In 2014 JDI has been Nationally Accredited by the Indonesian Directorate of Higher Education.
Articles
855
Articles
Evaluation of Apical Transportation During Calcium Hydroxide Paste Removal Using 2 Different Rotary Systems-invitro study

Shetty, Aditya ( A.B.Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences,Deralakatte, Mangaluru, Karnataka state. ) , Rao, Lakshmi Nidhi ( Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, A.B.Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences,Deralakatte, Mangaluru, Karnataka state. ) , Tahiliani, Divya ( A.B.Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences,Deralakatte, Mangaluru, Karnataka state. ) , Hedge, Mithra N ( Department of Conservative Dentistry and Endodontics, A.B.Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences,Deralakatte, Mangaluru, Karnataka state. )

Journal of Dentistry Indonesia Vol 25, No 2 (2018): AUGUST
Publisher : Faculty of Dentistry, University of Indonesia

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Abstract

Objectives: This study was done to compare and evaluate incidence of apical transportation during calcium hydroxide paste removal using 2 different rotary systems on 40 degree curved simulated root canal blocks. Materials and Methods: 2 groups (n=15 Group 1- iRace Group 2- ProTaper) of simulated root canals were instrumented till working length. Post instrumentation images were taken under stereomicroscope with corresponding final file inserted into the canal to the working length. Calcium hydroxide paste with iodoform was placed till the working length and removed after 7 days using Master Apical File with copious irrigation. Images were taken under stereomicroscope post calcium hydroxide paste removal with corresponding final file inserted till the working length to assess the incidence of apical transportation. Images were printed and the angle was measured using Schneider’s technique by 3 examiners. Stereomicroscopic images were superimposed using Adobe Photoshop 8 software to observe any deviation in the original path. Results: The mean angle change after rotary instrumentation and calcium hydroxide removal were observed in both groups. Superimposed images showed greater root canal deviation in Group 2 than Group1.

Head and Face Injuries in Brazilian Victims of Homophobic Crimes

Cavalcanti, Alessandro Leite ( State University of Paraiba ) , Oliveira, Thaisy Sarmento Batista de, Oliveira, Thaliny Batista Sarmento de, Cavalcanti, Christiane Leite, Oliveira, Thaiany Batista Sarmento de, Cavalcanti, Alidianne Fabia Cabral

Journal of Dentistry Indonesia Vol 25, No 2 (2018): AUGUST
Publisher : Faculty of Dentistry, University of Indonesia

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Abstract

Objective: To investigate the occurrence of head and face injuries in victims of homophobic crimes. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted at the Specialized Police for Homophobic Crimes. Data were collected from the 56 police and medical reports corresponding to reported cases of homicide against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transsexual and transgender (LGBT, or sexual minority) in the period from May 2009 to July 2013. Variables studied related demographic profile of victims and patterns of trauma (type of arms, number of injuries and anatomical regions) were assessed. For bivariate analyses, the Chi-square and Fishers exact, with significance level of 5% were used. Results: 89.3% were homosexuals and 42.9 were gays. Firearms were the type of arms most used (46.4%), followed by cold steel (30.4%). Most victims presented multiple lesions (87.5%) and 44.6% presented injuries in the head and face. There was a statistically significant association between injuries in the head and face and the type of arms (P=0.001). Conclusion: Victims of homicide were mostly homosexuals and the main types of arms were firearms and cold steel. Most victims presented multiple lesions and injuries in the head and face were common and more frequent among lesbians and transvestites.

Evaluation and Comparison of smear layer removal and dentin microhardness using Maleic acid, EDTA and MTAD as irrigant.

Gupta, Natasha ( Assist Professor, Dept of Conservative Dentistry & Endodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi ) , Singh, Neelam ( Department of Conservative Dentistry, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi )

Journal of Dentistry Indonesia Vol 25, No 2 (2018): AUGUST
Publisher : Faculty of Dentistry, University of Indonesia

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Abstract

Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacy of various irrigating solutions on smear layer removal and dentin microhardness. Material & Method: 50 single rooted teeth were equally divided in two halves to evaluate smear layer removal and measure dentin microhardness. The teeth were randomly divided into 5 groups (n=10) based on the final irrigant used (Group 1: 17% EDTA, Group 2: 7% Maleic Acid,Group 3 10% Maleic Acid, Group 4: MTAD, Group 5: Saline (Control). Chemomechanical preparation was performed with a step back technique using K files. The half roots from each group were prepared for SEM to evaluate the smear layer in coronal, middle and apical thirds and the other halves were prepared to measure the dentin microhardness. Statistical Analysis: Statistical comparison was done by Kruskal Wallis One way ANOVA along with Post HOC Tukey HSD test with a significance level of 0.05. Result: The smear layer removal efficacy was comparable for all irrigants at coronal and middle one third regions. Apical one third region showed MTAD and 10% Maleic Acid to be most effective followed by 7% Maleic acid then 17% EDTA. The dentin microhardness was most affected by MTAD and 10% Maleic acid followed by 17% EDTA and least affected by 7% Maleic acid. Conclusion: 7% Maleic acid proved to be quite effective in smear layer with least affect on dentin microhardness.  

A cross sectional study to explore knowledge regarding use of oral hygiene aids among dental interns in India

Saquib, Shahabe Abullais ( King Khalid University ) , alqahatani, nabeeh abdullah ( King Khalid University ) , N, priyanka ( S.B Dental College and Hospital,Bidar, Karnataka. India ) , Lokhande, Nitin ( S.M.B.T Dental College and Hospital,Sangamner, Maharashtra. India )

Journal of Dentistry Indonesia Vol 25, No 2 (2018): AUGUST
Publisher : Faculty of Dentistry, University of Indonesia

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Abstract

Introduction: Oral health is strongly related to the general health of an individual. The most common oral diseases in developing countries are dental caries and periodontal disease. Dental plaque is the prime etiology for the periodontal disease.  Plaque control in periodontics can be accomplished by mechanical and chemical methods. Various oral hygiene aids are available to maintain the oral health status. Aim: This study was undertaken to assess the knowledge of dental interns about use of different oral hygiene aids in particular situation. The study design was a cross-sectional, one point time, multi-center, questionnaire based survey constructed with 12 questions. Material and methods: A total of 393 subjects (male=160, female=233) with the mean age of 24.6+5 were selected using a random sampling techniques from among dental interns across the Dental Colleges in India. Result: The result of the present study revealed that dental interns have adequate knowledge towards the basic tool to maintain oral hygiene. They have less knowledge about the interdental aids in specific situation, dose and frequency of use for chlorhexidine and oral irrigation devices. Conclusion: Dental interns have basic knowledge about oral hygiene tools; still greater emphasis is needed on oral hygiene aids education in the dental schools to upgrade the knowledge of the students.

Assessment of Dermatoglyphic Patterns With Malocclusion

Achalli, Sonika ( Lecturer, Dept Of Oral Medicine and Radiology A B Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Nitte University, Mangalore ) , Patla, Murali ( Lecturer, Dept of Orthodontics A B Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Nitte University, Mangalore ) , Nayak, Krishna ( Professor and Principal, Dept of Orthodontics A B Shetty Memorial Institute of Dental Sciences, Nitte University, Mangalore ) , B, Ashoka ( Professor, PG Department of Criminology and Forensic Sciences School Of Social Work, Mangalore ) , Bhat, Manohara ( Senior Resident, Dept of Dentistry Mysore Medical College and Research Institute, Mysore )

Journal of Dentistry Indonesia Vol 25, No 2 (2018): AUGUST
Publisher : Faculty of Dentistry, University of Indonesia

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Abstract

Dermatoglyphics is the study of fingerprints and skin patterns. Dermal configurations appear at the 12th week of intrauterine life and are completely established by the 24th week of intrauterine life. It is said that thereafter these configurations remain constant throughout life except for overall size. Objective-To assess the relationship between the fingerprint patterns with skeletal malocclusion. Materials and methods- Fingerprint patterns were collected from 90 subjects using ink method who were grouped into skeletal class I, skeletal class II, skeletal class III malocclusion consisting of 30 subjects each. Results- Loop pattern was more frequent in skeletal class I and skeletal class II malocclusion, whorl pattern was present with increased frequency in skeletal class III malocclusion. Conclusion- The study was an attempt to assess the relationship of dermatoglyphic patterns with skeletal malocclusion so that it can be used as an indicator of developing malocclusion at an early age.

GINGIVAL ENLARGEMENT IN RENAL TRANSPLANT PATIENTS: A META-ANALYSIS

Serindere, Gozde ( Mustafa Kemal University, Faculty of Dentistry ) , Ozveren, Neslihan ( Trakya University, Faculty of Dentistry )

Journal of Dentistry Indonesia Vol 25, No 2 (2018): AUGUST
Publisher : Faculty of Dentistry, University of Indonesia

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Abstract

Severe gingival enlargement (GE) is one of the most common observed effects in renal transplant patients due to the usage of cyclosporine A. GE causes pain, aesthetic problems, gingival bleeding and periodontal diseases. The databases of PubMed, Web of Science were searched for relevant studies from January 1990 to January 2018. Summary incidence rates, and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated by using random effects models. A total of 595 patients from 10 studies were included. The incidences of GE was 62.6% (95% CI: 41.9–79.5%) in patients using cyclosporine with or without any other drugs. Sub-group analysis according to diagnostic criteria showed that the incidence of GE was lower when a well defined diagnostic criteria or scoring system was implemented. The incidences of GE was 88.2% (95% CI: 80.9–93.0%) in patients using cyclosporine with nifedipine. Cyclosporine A without nifedipine was associated with a significantly decreased risk of GE incidence in comparison to cyclosporine A with nifedipine combination (Odds Ratio: 0.198; 95% CI, 0.083- 0.473; P < 0.001). It is important to know effects of these drugs which cause gingival enlargement and the treatment options for all clinicians. The dental evaluation in a service would be helpful for renal transplant children. The aim of this study was to gain more insight into the prevalence of gingival enlargement in renal transplant patiens.

IMPACTS OF TOOTH LOSS AND PREFERENCES FOR TOOTH REPLACEMENT AMONG CLINIC ATTENDEES AT A PUBLIC UNIVERSITY

Fang, Hew Pei ( Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia ) , En, Lee Jia ( Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia ) , Meei, Tew In ( Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia ) , Ahmad, Rohana ( Universiti Teknologi MARA ) , Abdul Aziz, Aznida Firzah ( Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia ) , Mohd Said, Shahida ( Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia ) , Mohd Dom, Tuti Ningseh ( Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia )

Journal of Dentistry Indonesia Vol 25, No 2 (2018): AUGUST
Publisher : Faculty of Dentistry, University of Indonesia

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Abstract

AIM To assess impacts of tooth loss, preferences for tooth replacement, and relationship between impacts of tooth loss and number of missing teeth. METHODS This is a descriptive cross-sectional survey involving a convenient sample of 244 patients attending a primary health centre and dental clinic at a public university. The respondents completed self-administrated questionnaires on personal background, status of tooth replacement, impacts of tooth loss using a 12-items modified Geriatric Oral Health Assessment Index (GOHAI), and preferences for tooth replacement. A dental examination was done to determine number of missing teeth RESULTS The mean age of the respondents was 56.2 years (S.D. 8.1). The mean number of missing teeth was 8.3 (S.D. 7.3); 62.7% had at least 20 natural teeth. Majority (62.3%) were not wearing dental prosthesis. Mean GOHAI score was 16.3 (S.D. 4.8). 66.0% experienced difficulty in biting some food, 59.4% worried about oral health and 57.8% experienced discomfort when eating. Dental implants were the most preferred replacement option (38.9%).  GOHAI scores were not related to number of missing teeth (Pearson’s r=-0.01, p=0.868). CONCLUSIONS Tooth loss and use of dental prosthesis had some impacts on quality of life although impacts were not high.

Two Different Methods of Oral Mucocele Management in Pediatric Patients : A Case Report

Katta, Nandini ( AIMST UNIVERSITY FACULTY OF DENTISTRY BEDONG KEDAH-08100 MALAYSIA ) , K M, Sudheesh ( AIMST UNIVERSITY Dept of Oral and Maxillofacial surgery Bedong, Semeling,Kedah, Malaysia-08100 Ph- +60 11517 44926 sudheeshkm7@gmail.com ) , Arekal, Shruthi ( postgraduate student Dr. Shruthi Arekal Dept of Paediatric Dentistry College of dental sciences Davangere-577004 )

Journal of Dentistry Indonesia Vol 25, No 2 (2018): AUGUST
Publisher : Faculty of Dentistry, University of Indonesia

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Abstract

Mucoceles are considered to be the most common oral lesion, with an approximate prevalence of around 2.4 cases per 1,000 people. The exact prevalence in children is not reported, but they are thought to occur more frequently in younger individuals when compared to adults. The age old treatment for mucocele involves surgical excision, which is associated with mental trauma and discomfort to the patient. Other treatment options that can be considered include cryosurgery, CO2 laser ablation, micro marsupialization, intralesional corticosteroid injection, marsupialization and electrocautery. Cryosurgery is the procedure where there is deliberate destruction of tissue by freezing, using liquid nitrogen. This treatment is well received by patients, as minimal or no local anesthesia is used, relative lack of discomfort, no bleeding and minimal to no scarring after healing. This paper discuses two cases of oral mucocele treated via surgical excision and cryosurgery. 

Role of Dentists in the Management of Behҫet’s Disease: A Case Report

Patoni, Nurfianti Ahmad ( Department of Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia, Indonesia ) , Sitheeque, Mohaideen AM. ( Department of Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia, Indonesia ) , Sarsito, Afi Savitri ( Department of Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia, Indonesia ) , Soegyanto, Anandina Irmagita ( Department of Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia, Indonesia ) , Wimardhani, Yuniardini Septorini ( (SCOPUS ID=56784363100) Department of Oral Medicine, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia, Indonesia )

Journal of Dentistry Indonesia Vol 25, No 2 (2018): AUGUST
Publisher : Faculty of Dentistry, University of Indonesia

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Abstract

Behcet’s disease (BD) is a multi-system recurrent inflammatory disorder occurring in the form of vasculitis of an unknown etiology. It most frequently affects oral and genital mucosa, skin, eyes, joints, and blood vessels. The definitive diagnosis of BD is based on major symptoms such as recurrent oral and genital ulcers and recurrent skin and ocular lesions, accompanied by symptoms related to various systems. However, early BD manifestations are very similar to recurrent aphthous stomatitis (RAS). Several years from its first appearance are often required for a definitive diagnosis. Objective: To describe a dentist’s role in BD management in a patient with a history of highly recurrent RAS. Case Report: We evaluated a 38-year-old man with a 10-year history of recurrent oral ulcers, accompanied by skin and eyes lesions. His intraoral examination revealed multi-sized ulcers with a yellowish-white base and regular edges, surrounded by an erythematous halo. Ulcers were located on the tongue, floor of the mouth, and gingival mucosa. Although BD diagnosis was not histopathologically confirmed, the patient’s lesions met the International Criteria for Behcet’s disease with a score of 5. Oral ulcers were managed with chlorhexidine mouthwash 2 times/day and supportive measures. A multidisciplinary approach was used for this patient to provide comprehensive treatment. Conclusion: Dentists can be the first clinicians to detect the possible development of BD in patients with symptoms similar to RAS, but additionally having skin and eye lesions.

The importance of storage time for human dental pulp stem cells isolation

Özen, Bugra ( Altinbas University ) , S, Salia Shabazi ( Altinbas University ) , Mousavi, Arash ( Altinbas University ) , Semeins, Cor M ( Altinbas University ) , Tüzüner, Tamer ( Altinbas University ) , İnce, Elif Bahar Tuna ( Altinbas University ) , Gemert – Schriks, Martine CM van ( Altinbas University ) , Strijp, AJP van ( Altinbas University ) , Bakker, Astrid D ( Altinbas University )

Journal of Dentistry Indonesia Vol 25, No 2 (2018): AUGUST
Publisher : Faculty of Dentistry, University of Indonesia

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Abstract

Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the importance of storage time and the tooth type for  isolation of  dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) from extracted human teeth.Materials & Methods:  35 human teeth (premolars, first molars and third molars) were used in this study. The teeth were stored in PBS medium after extraction and divided into two groups randomly according to the time elapsed between extraction and isolation. In group one, the isolation was performed within 2 hours and in the other group it was performed 24 hours after extraction.  Results:  There were no significant differences between isolation time and total cell counts (p=0.483) and between isolation time and viable cells (p=0.341). Also, there were no significant differences between the first molar and the premolar related cell counts and viable cells, but both teeth groups showed significant higher viability and had higher total cell amounts than third molars after isolation. Statistically significant correlations were found between age of donors and viable cells and viability after 24 hours isolation time.Conclusion: The immediate isolation of DPSCs is not necessary after the tooth extraction. The tooth can be stored in a PBS medium at room temperature up to twenty four hours after the extraction without a significant reduction in cell viability and counts. Also, the cells obtained from younger donors might have more chance for more viability even if storage time was extended.

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