cover
Contact Name
Ivan Ferdian
Contact Email
ivan.ijgbg@gmail.com
Phone
-
Journal Mail Official
ivan.ijgbg@gmail.com
Editorial Address
-
Location
Kota bandung,
Jawa barat
INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience
ISSN : 23559314     EISSN : 23559306     DOI : -
Core Subject : Science,
The spirit to improve the journal to be more credible is increasing, and in 2012 it invited earth scientists in East and Southeast Asia as well as some western countries to join the journal for the editor positions in the Indonesia Journal of Geology. This is also to realize our present goal to internationalize the journal, The Indonesian Journal on Geoscience, which is open for papers of geology, geophysics, geochemistry, geodetics, geography, and soil science. This new born journal is expected to be published three times a year. As an international publication, of course it must all be written in an international language, in this case English. This adds difficulties to the effort to obtain good papers in English to publish although the credit points that an author will get are much higher.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 534 Documents
Hydrocarbon Source Rock Potential of the Sinamar Formation, Muara Bungo, Jambi Zajuli, Moh. Heri Hermiyanto; Panggabean, Hermes
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 1, No 1 (2014)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (690.87 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i1.175

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i1.175The Oligocene Sinamar Formation consists of shale, claystone, mudstone, sandstone, conglomeratic sandstone, and intercalation of coal seams. The objective of study was to identify the hydrocarbon source rock potential of the Sinamar Formation based on geochemichal characteristics. The analyses were focused on fine sediments of the Sinamar Formation comprising shale, claystone, and mudstone. Primary data collected from the Sinamar Formation well and outcrops were analyzed according to TOC, pyrolisis analysis, and gas chromatography - mass spectometry of normal alkanes that include isoprenoids and sterane. The TOC value indicates a very well category. Based on TOC versus Pyrolysis Yields (PY) diagram, the shales of Sinamar Formation are included into oil prone source rock potential with good to excellent categories. Fine sediments of the Sinamar Formation tend to produce oil and gas originated from kerogen types I and III. The shales tend to generate oil than claystone and mudstone and therefore they are included into a potential source rock. 
Limestone Microfacies of Baturaja Formation along Air Rambangnia Traverse, South OKU, South Sumatra Maryanto, Sigit
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 1, No 1 (2014)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1399.452 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i1.173

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i1.173Limestones of the Baturaja Formation occur at Air Rambangnia traverse, South Ogan Komering Ulu, South Sumatra, and they are used as objects for microfacies studies. The microfacies studies are based on a detailed petro­graphic analysis of thirty four limestone samples, taken from the traverse. Four types of the limestones are identified such as wackestone, packstone, grainstone, and floatstone. At least five microfacies form the limestone succesion of the Baturaja Formation. They are interpreted as sedimentary facies of very restricted bay and pond, back reef local slope, slope and shelf edge, winnowed platform edge sand, and reef flank facies.  
Wrench-Slip Reversals and Structural Inversions: Cenozoic Slide-Rule Tectonics in Sundaland Tjia, H.D.
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 1, No 1 (2014)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1140.203 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i1.174

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i1.174Most of continental Southeast Asia, that is, Sundaland and Indosinia, achieved a relative tectonic stability by the beginning of the Cenozoic. Since then a strong tectonic activity in Sundaland has been restricted to existing regional fault zones and to regional slow, vertical crustal movements elsewhere that produced small to very large sedimentary basins. On the other hand, regional deformation of Indosinia as a consequence of ductile shearing has continued into the Paleogene. Since the Oligocene, the northern part of Sundaland and Indosinia have been extruded differentially towards southeast along the Red River, Wang Chao (or Mae Ping, or Tonle Sap), and Three Pagodas - Axial Malay fault zones. The initial cause has been attributed to hard collision between Subplate India with Megaplate Eurasia. Plate dynamics in the region have changed substantially since Mid-Miocene as to force wrench-slip reversals along the major fault zones in Sundaland as well as in Indosinia. Concomitant structural inversions are demonstrated on seismic sections. In the core of Sundaland, earlier transtensional wrenching was succeeded by transpressive strike-slip faulting that on major faults of the Malay Basin manifested in reversals of sense. From the Hinge-line fault eastward, the transtensional left wrench slip was succeeded by transpressional dextral slip, while in the region to its west the wrench-slip kinematics was an earlier transtensional right slip followed by transpressional left slip. In the Strait of Malacca and eastern margin of Sumatra, right-lateral wrenching in the Neogene has been common. In certain places it could be established a wrench-slip of transtensional character in Oligocene-Early Miocene, and the transpressional wrench movement occurred mainly during the Middle to Late Miocene. The remarkable coincidence of termination of spreading of the South China Basin in Langhian, and that of the West Philippine and Caroline basins during Mid-Miocene invites further study.
Some Key Features and Possible Origin of the Metamorphic Rock-Hosted Gold Mineralization in Buru Island, Indonesia Idrus, Arifudin; Prihatmoko, Sukmandaru; Hartono, Hill. Gendoet; Idrus, Fadlin; Ernowo, Ernowo; Franklin, Franklin; Moetamar, Moetamar; Setiawan, Iwan
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 1, No 1 (2014)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (998.411 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i1.172

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i1.172This paper discusses characteristics of some key features of the primary Buru gold deposit as a tool for a better understanding of the deposit genesis. Currently, about 105,000 artisanal and small-scale gold miners (ASGM) are operating in two main localities, i.e. Gogorea and Gunung Botak by digging pits/shafts following gold-bearing quartz vein orientation. The gold extraction uses mercury (amalgamation) and cyanide processing. The field study identifies two types/generations of quartz veins namely (1) Early quartz veins which are segmented, sigmoidal, dis­continous, and parallel to the foliation of host rock. The quartz vein is lack of sulfides, weak mineralized, crystalline, relatively clear, and maybe poor in gold, and (2) Quartz veins occurred within a ‘mineralized zone’ of about 100 m in width and ~1,000 m in length. The gold mineralization is strongly overprinted by an argillic alteration zone. The mineralization-alteration zone is probably parallel to the mica schist foliation and strongly controlled by N-S or NE-SW-trending structures. The gold-bearing quartz veins are characterized by banded texture particularly colloform following host rock foliation and sulphide banding, brecciated, and rare bladed-like texture. The alteration types consist of propylitic (chlorite, calcite, sericite), argillic, and carbonation represented by graphite banding and carbon flakes. The ore mineralization is characterized by pyrite, native gold, pyrrhotite, and arsenopyrite. Cinnabar, stibnite, chalcopyrite, galena, and sphalerite are rare or maybe absent. In general, sulphide minerals are rare (<3%). Fifteen rock samples were collected in Wamsaid area for geochemical assaying for Au, Ag, As, Sb, Hg, Cu, Pb, and Zn. Eleven of fifteen samples yielded more than 1.00 g/t Au, in which six of them are in excess of 3.00 g/t Au. It can be noted that all high-grade samples are originally or containing limonitic materials, that suggest the role of supergene enrichment. Interestingly, most of the high-grade samples contain also high grade As (up to 991ppm), Sb (up to 885 ppm), and Hg (up to 75 ppm). Fluid inclusions in both quartz vein types consist of four phases including L-rich, V-rich, L-V-rich, and L1-L2-V (CO2)-rich phases. Mineralizing hydrothermal fluid is typified by CO2-rich fluid, moderate temperature of 300 - 400 ºC and a typical low salinity (0.36 to 0.54 wt.% NaCl eq). Based on those key features, gold mineraliza­tion in Buru Island meets the characteristics of LS epithermal or orogenic gold deposit types; however, it tends to be fitter with orogenic gold deposit rather than another type.  
Stratigraphy and Tectonics of the East Ketungau Basin, West Kalimantan during Palaeogene Suyono, Suyono
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 8, No 4 (2013)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1239.963 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i4.170

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i4.170East Ketungau Basin is one of frontier basins in Indonesia. Some of these basins, especially those in eastern Indonesia, have been identified to possess potential of oil and gas. The existing publications of geological fieldworks and extensive exploration in the East Ketungau Basin are limited. The detailed sedimentological and biostratigraphical studies of the sedimentary succession will be used to reconstruct the tectonic and palaeogeographical history of the basin. The sedimentary Mandai Group consists of three facies such as mudstone facies, clean sand facies and alternation between thinly coal seam, coaly shale, and claystone facies. However, each facies characterizes depositional environment of barrier- island and associated strand-plain systems.
Gold Phytomining: A New Idea for Enviromental Sustainablity in Indonesia Krisnayanti, Baiq Dewi; Anderson, Christopher
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 1, No 1 (2014)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (542.201 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i1.171

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i1.171New technology is needed to protect the safety and health of communities and the environment at ASGM locations in Indonesia. This technology must be simple, cheap, easy to operate, and financially rewarding. A proven option that should be promoted is phytoextraction, a farming activity that could develop agriculture as an alternative livelihood in ASGM areas. This is a technology where plants are used to extract metals from waste rock, soil, or water. These metals can be recovered from the plant in its pure form, then be sold or recycled. Gold phytoextraction is a commercially available technology, while an international research has shown that phytoextraction will also work for mercury. In the context of this idea, tailings would be contained in ‘farming areas’ and cropped using phytoextraction technology. Gold and mercury would be extracted in the crops, with the remaining mercury burden of the tailings becoming adsorbed to soil constituents. The system would be financially rewarding to ‘gold farmers’. The economic value of this scenario could facilitate the clean-up and management of mercury pollution, reducing the movement of mercury from tailings into soil, water, and plants, thereby mitigating environmental and human risk in the mining areas. The goal of the described research is to promote agriculture as an alternative livelihood in ASGM areas. The gold value of the phytoremediation crop should provide a cash incentive to artisanal farmers who develop this new agricultural enterprise. The benefits will be social, environmental, and economic, as opportunities for education, employment, new business, the containment of toxic mercury, food safety and security, and revenue are all realized.
Characteristics and Origin of Sedimentary-Related Manganese Layers in Timor Island, Indonesia Idrus, Arifudin; Ati, E. M.; Harijoko, A.; Meyer, F. M.
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 8, No 4 (2013)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (2452.311 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i4.169

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i4.169Sedimentary-related manganese layers have been discovered in South Central Timor Regency, Timor Island, Indonesia, which is tectonically active and being uplifted due to north-trending tectonic collision between Timor Island arc and Australian continental crust. The manganese layers of 2 to 10 cm-wide interbed with deep sea sedimentary rocks including reddish - reddish brown claystone, radiolarian chert, slate, marl as well as white and pinkish calcilutite of Nakfunu Formations. Stratigraphically, the rock formations are underlain by Bobonaro Formation. Two types of manganese ores found comprise manganese layers and manganese nodule. The manganese layers strongly deformed, lenticular, and segmented, are composed of manganite [MnO(OH)], groutite [MnO(OH)], pyrolusite (MnO2), lithioporite (Al,Li) MnO2(OH)2, and hollandite [Ba (Mn4+, Mn2+)8O16] associated with gangue minerals including calcite, quartz, limonite [FeO(OH)], hematite (Fe2O3), and barite (BaSO4). Whilst the nodule type is only composed of manganite and less limonite. Geochemically, the manganese layers have grade of 63 - 72 wt.% MnO, whereas the nodule one has grade of 63 - 69 wt.% MnO. Generally, iron in Mn ore is very low ranging from 0.2 to 1.54 wt.% Fe2O3, averaged 0.76 wt.%. Hence, Fe/Mn ratio which is very low (0.003 - 0.069), typically indicates a sedimentary origin, which is also supported by petrologic and petrographic data showing layering structure of manganite and lithioporite crystal/grain. Trace element geochemistry indicates that manganese ore was precipitated in a reduction condition. Rare earth element (REE) analysis of manganese ore shows an enrichment of cerium (Ce) suggesting that the ore is basically originated in a marine environment. The manganese nodule is interpreted to be formed by chemical concretion process of unsoluble metals (i.e. mangan, iron) in seawater (hydrogenous) and precipitated on deep sea bottom. On the other hand, the manganese layer is a detrital diagenetic deposit formed by Mn remobilization in seawater column, precipitated and sedimented on the deep sea bottom. Manganese layers have probably been influenced by ‘hydrothermal process’ of mud-volcano activities, proven by the presence of quartz and barite veinlets cutting the Mn layers, manganite recrystallization to be pyrolusite along veinlets cutting manganite and lithioporite layers, and the presence of pyrite and sulphur associated with Mn layers. Field data also exhibit that the significant manganese layers are mostly found around mud volcanoes. The closely spatial and genetic relationships between manganese layers and mud-volcanoes might also be an important guide for the exploration of Mn deposit in the region.
Geotectonic Configuration of Kulon Progo Area, Yogyakarta Syafri, Ildrem; Budiadi, E.; Sudradjat, A.
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 8, No 4 (2013)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (931.251 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i4.168

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i4.168Kulon Progo Mountain, located west of Yogyakarta, is known as a unique morphological expression of an elongated dome frequently called “oblong dome”. The structural elements occurring in Kulon Progo Mountain were predominated by a radial pattern. Applying a quantitative method to measure various morphometric elements however, revealed that the regional geotectonic pattern apparently controlled the development of Kulon Progo Mountain. A general picture of the tectonics showed that the mountain building of Kulon Progo was not solely predominated by a vertical undation force; instead it was closely related to the general geotectonics operating in the area. The macro morphological analysis using various types of satellite imageries augmented with field visits unraveled three regional tectonic stages controlled the development of Kulon Progo Mountain. Those are Meratus, Sunda, and Java trends, operating in SW-NE, NNW-SSE, and E-W directions respectively.
Interstratified Illite/Montmorillonite in Kamojang Geothermal Field, Indonesia Yudiantoro, D. F.; suparka, E.; Yuwono, S.; Takashima, I.; Ishiyama, D.; Kamah, Y.; Hutabarat, J.
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 8, No 4 (2013)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1141.816 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i4.167

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i4.167Kamojang geothermal field located in West Java Province, falls under the Pangkalan Subregency, Bandung Regency. The researched area is a geothermal field located in the Quaternary volcanic caldera system of about 0.452 to 1.2 Ma. The volcanic activity generated hydrothermal fluids, interacting with rocks producing mineral alteration. The minerals formed in the areas of research are interstratified illite/montmorillonite (I/M). Analyses to identify interstratified I/M have been performed by X-ray diffraction using ethylene glycol, while the determination of the type and percentage of interstratified I/M was based on the calculation method of Watanabe. The methodology was applied on core and cutting samples from Wells KMJ-8, 9, 11, 13, 16, 23, 49, 51, and 54. The result of analysis of the samples shows that the type of clay is interstratified illite/montmorillonite and the minerals are formed at temperatures ranging from 180 to 220° C. The type of interstratified I/M in the studied area is S = 0 and S = 1. The percentage of illite type S = 0 is between 20 - 35% illite, whereas type S = 1 has about 45 - 72% illite. Along with the increasing depth, the percentage of illite is getting greater. This is consistent with the vertical distribution of temperature which increases according to the depth. This correlation results in an interpretation that the upflow zone of the geothermal reservoir is located in the centre of the Kamojang geothermal field.
Characteristics of Paleotsunami Sediments, A Case Study in Cilacap and Pangandaran Coastal Areas, Jawa, Indonesia Yudhicara, Yudhicara; Zaim, Y.; Rizal, Y.; Aswan, Aswan; Triyono, R.; Setiyono, U.; hartanto, D.
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 8, No 4 (2013)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (2693.2 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i4.166

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i4.166A paleotsunami study having been conducted in 2011 took two study cases in Cilacap and Pangandaran coastal areas. These two regions have been devastated by tsunami in the past and had the most severe damaged on 17 July 2006. Trenching, beach profiling, and sediment sampling had been carried out, and further analysis at the laboratory had been done, such as grain size and fossil analyses and dating. In Cilacap, an iron sand layer was found as a key bed suspected as a paleotsunami deposits due to the content of anthropogenic fragments. In Pangandaran, two layers of tsunami deposit candidates were found having thickness of 5 - 6 cm at the top as a 2006 tsunami deposit candidate, and 5 - 10 cm at the bottom as a paleotsunami deposit candidate. Both grain size and fossil analysis results could explain that Pangandaran’s sediments are tsunami deposits while Cilacap’s ones are assumed to be deposited by another process rather than a tsunami.

Page 1 of 54 | Total Record : 534


Filter by Year

2006 2019


Filter By Issues
All Issue Vol 6, No 3 (2019): in-press Vol 6, No 2 (2019) Vol 6, No 1 (2019) Vol 6, No 2 (2019) Vol 6, No 1 (2019) Vol 5, No 3 (2018) Vol 5, No 2 (2018) Vol 5, No 1 (2018) Vol 5, No 3 (2018) Vol 5, No 2 (2018) Vol 5, No 1 (2018) Vol 4, No 3 (2017) Vol 4, No 2 (2017) Vol 4, No 1 (2017) Vol 4, No 3 (2017) Vol 4, No 2 (2017) Vol 4, No 1 (2017) Vol 3, No 3 (2016) Vol 3, No 2 (2016) Vol 3, No 1 (2016) Vol 3, No 3 (2016) Vol 3, No 2 (2016) Vol 3, No 1 (2016): in-press Vol 2, No 3 (2015) Vol 2, No 2 (2015) Vol 2, No 1 (2015) Vol 2, No 3 (2015) Vol 2, No 2 (2015) Vol 2, No 1 (2015) Vol 1, No 3 (2014) Vol 1, No 2 (2014) Vol 1, No 1 (2014) Vol 1, No 3 (2014) Vol 1, No 2 (2014) Vol 1, No 1 (2014) Vol 8, No 4 (2013) Vol 8, No 3 (2013) Vol 8, No 2 (2013) Vol 8, No 1 (2013) Vol 8, No 4 (2013) Vol 8, No 3 (2013) Vol 8, No 2 (2013) Vol 8, No 1 (2013) Vol 7, No 4 (2012) Vol 7, No 3 (2012) Vol 7, No 2 (2012) Vol 7, No 1 (2012) Vol 7, No 4 (2012) Vol 7, No 3 (2012) Vol 7, No 2 (2012) Vol 7, No 1 (2012) Vol 6, No 4 (2011) Vol 6, No 3 (2011) Vol 6, No 2 (2011) Vol 6, No 1 (2011) Vol 6, No 4 (2011) Vol 6, No 3 (2011) Vol 6, No 2 (2011) Vol 6, No 1 (2011) Vol 5, No 4 (2010) Vol 5, No 3 (2010) Vol 5, No 2 (2010) Vol 5, No 1 (2010) Vol 5, No 4 (2010) Vol 5, No 3 (2010) Vol 5, No 2 (2010) Vol 5, No 1 (2010) Vol 4, No 4 (2009) Vol 4, No 3 (2009) Vol 4, No 2 (2009) Vol 4, No 1 (2009) Vol 4, No 4 (2009) Vol 4, No 3 (2009) Vol 4, No 2 (2009) Vol 4, No 1 (2009) Vol 3, No 4 (2008) Vol 3, No 3 (2008) Vol 3, No 2 (2008) Vol 3, No 1 (2008) Vol 3, No 4 (2008) Vol 3, No 3 (2008) Vol 3, No 2 (2008) Vol 3, No 1 (2008) Vol 2, No 4 (2007) Vol 2, No 3 (2007) Vol 2, No 2 (2007) Vol 2, No 1 (2007) Vol 2, No 4 (2007) Vol 2, No 3 (2007) Vol 2, No 2 (2007) Vol 2, No 1 (2007) Vol 1, No 4 (2006) Vol 1, No 3 (2006) Vol 1, No 2 (2006) Vol 1, No 1 (2006) Vol 1, No 4 (2006) Vol 1, No 3 (2006) Vol 1, No 2 (2006) Vol 1, No 1 (2006) More Issue