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Kota surabaya,
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INDONESIA
BEYOND WORDS
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Core Subject : Education, Social,
A journal on language education, applied linguistics and curriculum & instructions
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 3, No 1 (2015)" : 8 Documents clear
Wisdom as an Outcome of Critical Thinking in the School Curriculum Towndrow, Phillip A.
BEYOND WORDS Vol 3, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

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Abstract

Abstract This article considers a way of enacting critical thinking in the school curriculum. An alternative to adopting a formal framework of critical thinking which may not be exhaustive or include desirable components, involves working towards the generation of wisdom—defined as the quality of having the experience, knowledge and insight to think and act aptly in a specific context for a particular purpose—as a way for learners to make meanings that potentially have personal and social significance. The article uses a real-world example to illustrate how critical thinking can be driven by inquiry and underpinned by explanation to demonstrate practical knowledge and understanding in specific circumstances. Keywords: wisdom, critical thinking, curriculum, instruction, task design, classroom practice
Learner’s English Proficiency and their Pragmatic Competence of Refusal Speech Acts Tabatabaei, Soudabeh; Farnia, Maryam
BEYOND WORDS Vol 3, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

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Abstract

Abstract The present study is an attempt to investigate the relationship between language proficiency and ‎pragmatic comprehension of the refusal speech act among Iranian EFL learners. To this end, the ‎Oxford Placement Test (OPT), as a proficiency test, was given to participants and they were ‎divided into high and low level groups based on their proficiency scores. Then, a multiple-choice ‎discourse completion task (MDCT) was given to both groups to elicit their pragmatic ‎knowledge. The findings indicated that there was no significant ‎difference between high and low groups in pragmatic comprehension. In other words, language ‎proficiency was not the determining factor in the degree of pragmatic comprehension. Moreover, the results indicated that there was no correlation between learners’ language proficiency and pragmatic knowledge. Therefore, ‎in order to have pragmatically competent EFL learners, they should be taught pragmatic functions and language norms of the target language in the language classrooms. Keywords: Pragmatic comprehension, Speech acts, Refusal speech act, MDCT.
About the Authors Soedjatmiko, Wuri
BEYOND WORDS Vol 3, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

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Abstract

Assessing Learner Autonomy and EFL Vocabulary Acquisition: A Case Study Feng, Teng
BEYOND WORDS Vol 3, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

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Abstract

The importance of autonomy learning is widely acknowledged in teaching English as a Foreign Language (EFL) in Asian contexts. The present study attempted to report low proficiency level students’ autonomous vocabulary learning. The first part of the present study focused on exploring how learners perceived and experienced their autonomous vocabulary learning, with a questionnaire and group discussion applied to collect data. During the second part of the study, the data were discussed collaboratively by six teachers to identify the different approaches utilized by learners. Priorities included setting weekly goals, self-planning and self-monitoring the process of learning vocabulary. Results also revealed that a weak ‘top-down’ approach in implementing learner autonomy is inadequate. Teachers need to provide scaffolding skills tailored to learners’ context-specific needs, for which a strong ‘bottom-up’ approach is more appropriate in supporting autonomous learning. In this case, classroom time should be allocated to demonstrate the strategies and teachers should work collaboratively to develop resources and materials for learners’ autonomous vocabulary learning. The present study also addressed the need for establishing an effective intervention for supporting learner autonomy. Keywords: learner autonomy, vocabulary learning, self-plan, self-monitor
Indonesian EFL Teachers in the Swing of Curricula Ashadi, Ashadi
BEYOND WORDS Vol 3, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

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Abstract

In the era of standard-based education which is marked by the reforms in many areas of education including curriculum, it is necessary to understand how Indonesian EFL teachers coped with curricular change in the course of their profession. This study attempts to discover how EFL teachers in Indonesia perceive the curricular changes through their beliefs, attitudes, and practices. Employing an on-line survey combined with semi-structured individual interviews, the qualitative study began with mapping EFL teachers’ generic perceptions towards curricular change. The initial map was then used to probe major emergent themes through individual interviews on purposively selected participants. The result showed that: (1) teachers’ belief was perceived to reshape through adequate socialization and training. (2), it took time to witness teachers’ belief formation and eventually attitudinal change, and (3) as their beliefs and practices were reshaped, teachers’ practice was highly likely to change moreover when improvement in learning gains were achieved by the students. However, the latter is often dismayed by the implementation of high-stakes testing (The National Examinations). This article is closed with relevant recommendations based on the particular findings. Keywords: Curricular change, teacher belief, teacher practice, qualitative
Reflection as the Homebase of Teacher Education Susanto, Andrias Tri
BEYOND WORDS Vol 3, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

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Abstract

Abstract Reflection is widely accepted as a process to support, or even underlie, teacher education. However, the concept holds several confusions among education experts and practitioners. This article would then attempt to explain some confusing terms by reviewing relevant literature on this issue and to provide discussions on the benefits and challenges of reflection manifested in various options of reflective practicum. Keywords: Reflection, teacher education, reflective practicum
Improving Elementary School Students’ English Vocabulary Through Local Cultural Content Materials Manurung, Frans; Harjanto, Ignatius
BEYOND WORDS Vol 3, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

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Abstract

Abstract Elementary students of a certain public school in Indonesia had difficulties in learning English. One of the crucial problems was learning English vocabulary. In an attempt to help the students learn and improve English vocabulary, the researchers decided to use CAR to teach English vocabulary with local cultural content materials. The aim of this study was to investigate how the teaching of English vocabulary with local cultural content materials contributed to the improvement of the students’ English vocabulary mastery. The topics covered in the materials were selected based on schemata theory. Vocabulary learning process was done through several activities provided in the materials: classroom and outside vocabulary learning. The results showed that the teaching of local cultural content materials have contributed to the improvement of the Elementary students’ vocabulary mastery. The schematic knowledge found in the familiar topics has aroused the students’ interest and motivation in learning English vocabulary. Students who were more familiar with the topics could respond to the vocabulary learning better than those who were not familiar with. The vocabulary mastery was more successful only if the students participated in both classroom and outside vocabulary learning process. Keywords: Vocabulary Mastery, Vocabulary Improvement, Local Cultural Content Materials, Vocabulary Learning, Schemata
Collaborative Learning or Cooperative Learning? The Name Is Not Important; Flexibility Is Jacobs, George M.
BEYOND WORDS Vol 3, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

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Abstract

Abstract A great deal of theory and research, not to mention students’ and teachers’ practical experience, supports the use of group activities in education. Collaborative learning and cooperative learning are two terms commonly used in discussions of how and why to use group activities. This article looks at the issue of whether the two terms collaborative learning and cooperative learning are synonymous or whether they represent different conceptualisations of how and why students should interact as part of their learning. Those scholars who differentiate the two terms often see collaborative learning as more student centred and cooperative learning as a more teacher centred way to facilitate student-student interaction. The present article argues that collaborative and cooperative learning should be seen as synonymous student centric approaches, and that teachers and students, regardless of which of the two terms they use, should and will vary the ways they shape their learning environments in order to best facilitate the cognitive and affective benefits that student-student interaction offers. Keywords: Collaborative learning, cooperative learning, flexibility

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