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Kota surabaya,
Jawa timur
INDONESIA
BEYOND WORDS
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Core Subject : Education, Social,
A journal on language education, applied linguistics and curriculum & instructions
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 86 Documents
Critical Pedagogy in TESL/TEFL: How Far Can We Go? Yumarnamto, Mateus
BEYOND WORDS Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

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Abstract

In this post-method era, perspectives and stances gain momentum as postmodernist’ educators highlight teachers’ agency in transforming the students and the society. In this framework, this paper discusses two approaches in teaching English as a second or foreign language (TESL/TEFL). The first perspective is critical pedagogy and the second is pragmatic pedagogy. By discussing the two important perspectives, this paper aims at understanding the path for better practices, both in research and teaching in TESL/TEFL. More importantly, it also discusses its relevance to teaching English in Indonesian.
Encouraging Second Language Use in Cooperative Learning Groups Jacobs, George M; Kimura, Harumi
BEYOND WORDS Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

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Abstract

This article presents, explains and organizes ideas for promoting students’ use of their second language (this term includes foreign language) when they work together in cooperative learning groups. The first part of the article reviews arguments as to whether students of second languages should be encouraged to use their second language with classmates when doing group activities. These arguments are discussed with reference to Second Language Acquisition (SLA) theory. Practical issues are also explored. Next, the majority of the article presents ideas on how to promote second language use during peer interaction. Twenty-nine of these ideas are explained. The ideas are organized into five categories: a role for the L1; understanding the issue; creating a conducive climate; providing language support; and the task. It is recommended that teachers use ideas from the literature on cooperative learning when they ask students to interact.
English Tsunami in Indonesian Sadtono, E.
BEYOND WORDS Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

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Abstract

English has successfully overwhelmed Indonesian like tsunami as an imperialistic language. The meaning of imperialism here, however, differs from the conventional meaning as it is invited imperialism, not coerced imperialism.The influence of English in Indonesian is discussed in terms of modernization, globalization, economy, and history. The linguistic tsunami effects are overwhelming, staggering, and unstoppable. The data for this article were collected from various sources, and it was found that the number of English words (pure and modified) is indeed confounding. Virtually English words have penetrated all walks of life. Unfortunately, there is no way we can prevent English influence on Indonesian, it is simply inevitable and we cannot do anything about it. Seen from linguistic purism, we have lost the battle in fighting off English influence; but seen from the eye of a descriptive linguist, it is an unpreventable historical phenomenon. It is a lingusitic dynamism in which language is altered and enriched by a continuous input from other languages, the most influential language being the major donor of loanwords of the receiving language. If it is considered a problem, the solution is to change our attitude to realize that any living language continues undergoing modifications and we should be willing to accommodate them. It is the dialectics of world history.
Motivational Implications of Heritage Language Identity for Heritage Language Learning Berardi-Wiltshire, Arianna
BEYOND WORDS Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

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Abstract

The article discusses the significance of elements of Italian identity (Italianità) for the language learning motivation of learners of Italian descent studying their heritage language (HL) by means of foreign language (FL) courses in Wellington, New Zealand. Adopting a social constructivist perspective on both second language learning and the motivational processes underlying it, the study utilizes qualitative data collected through waves of semi-structured interviews from five case-study participants to map the influence that their constructions of Italianità exert on their motivational trajectories over the course of several months of learning. The paper discusses a selection of data excerpts to show how motivational fluctuations are the result of the learners’ own processing of and reaction to elements of their sociocultural context. In particular, an analysis of the learners’ accounts of social exchanges and other crucial events involving the use of the HL outside the classroom will illustrate how these can support motivation by reinforcing the learners’ perceptions of their Italianità, strengthening existing learning goals and/or prompting the formation of new ones. The article concludes with some remarks on the implications for teaching practices and extra-curricular activities that could benefit HL learners by increasing their exposure to the HL outside the classroom while validating and encouraging the personal identity constructions and ambitions at the basis of their learning.
Using Students’ Authentic Writings to Teach an Apprenticeship Report Datu, Yerly A.
BEYOND WORDS Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

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Abstract

An Apprenticeship Report as one of the obligatory products that students of Business English of Politeknik Ubaya have to produce becomes an important requirement since, during the writing process, it also involves the company where the students undergo the apprenticeship in their last semester. Having examined their writings, I found quite troublesome linguistic accuracy in their writings. Due to these most frequently occurring errors, I was finally triggered to make use their authentic writings as my teaching sources. Then, to follow up, I intentionally collected their works to be selected to be the teaching sources as I believed that bringing authenticity in the classroom produce positive feedback and substantial language learning (Reid, 1993: 177). Therefore, in this paper, I discussed further about the use of authentic materials and approaches in teaching writing using authentic materials. To obtain information whether authentic materials gave positive responses from the students or not, a set of questionnaire was distributed to them in all stages; pre-, whilst-, and post-writing. Overall results have shown positive responses from the students as they were exposed to their seniors’ authentic writings and experienced authentic-materials-based activities which I designed purposely for them.
The Correlation between the Writing Ability and Self-esteem of Surabaya Merchant Marine Academy Students Dias, Agata
BEYOND WORDS Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

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Abstract

Writing in EFL has been an essential requirement for Students of Surabaya Merchant Marine Academy because it is used when they are on board. Even though it is compulsory, the writing progress is unsatisfactory. Recent studies widely investigate and find the correlation between affective factors in learning, especially self-esteem, and student’s writing improvements. Following the issues, the present study investigated the correlation between Surabaya Merchant Marine Academy students’ English writing progress and their self-esteem. The data were collected using two instruments; Test of English Writing (TEW) and Questionnaire of Self-esteem (QSE) which covers three sections of questionnaire; global, situational and task self-esteem. The instruments were distributed to 107 students. Then the data were analyzed using Pearson Product Moment. Results of the study revealed that the overall scores of TEW indicated that the level of the student’s writing ability was fair; the highest correlation level appeared between situational self-esteem and writing ability and the lowest correlation level appeared between global self-esteem and writing ability, and finally the correlation between self-esteem and writing ability of the students was significantly positive.
EFL Secondary Students’ Perceptions on Native and Nonnative English-Speaking Teachers Tjokrokanoko, Angelia; Tedjasuksmana, Hendra
BEYOND WORDS Vol 1, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

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Abstract

This study examined the secondary students’ perceptions towards NESTs and NNESTs in an English course in Surabaya regarding the teachers’ teaching competence, cultural knowledge of English language teaching, teaching style, and classroom management. Most secondary students perceived both teacher groups were good at most categories. Using questionnaires distributed to 96 secondary school students of an English course who participated in this study, the researchers found that 38 students took part in doing a focus group interview. The interview was done to capture deeper perceptions that could be gained. The study reported that cultural knowledge of the English language teachers, especially the NESTs, exceeded that of the NNESTs. This research finding also proved that students perceived NESTs to be as good as NNESTs in such areas as teaching grammar, listening, reading, and writing. Furthermore, both NESTs and NNESTs were perceived to be not able to understand the students’ special needs since teachers at the the English course under study handled one level for about twelve meetings only.
The Student-Bloggers’ Voices on the Contribution of EFL Writing Through Blogging Sari, Silvana Devinta
BEYOND WORDS Vol 2, No 1 (2014)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

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Abstract

Blogging is an effective way to help students write better as it positively enhances the students’ EFL writing skills. The following study is an attempt to evaluate student-bloggers’ opinions on blogging activity as it gives valuable contributions to student’s EFL writing skill. The research aimed at investigating student-bloggers’ attitudes towards the application of class blog in an informal learning situation. A descriptive case study was conducted to get more information on blogging contributions to student-bloggers’ EFL writing both for the process and the product of writing. The subjects were the student-bloggers of a language course whose blogging activity was intense. The data gathering was employed by probing interview and observation. Additionally, the thorough and meticulous analysis on the product of the writing was performed and scored using a rubric. Findings gathered from the interview depict the benefits and positive contributions of blogging to student-bloggers’ EFL writing. Blogging was certainly seen as a fun writing activity by the student-bloggers. It resulted from the fact that contrary to school learning, while blogging the students experienced autonomous learning, getting direct feedback from readers, and most importantly a complete freedom in writing. Some of blogging contributions for EFL writing are multi-literacy, direct feedback from readers, motivation, autonomous learning, critical thinking and language awareness, networking, freedom to write, and self confidence.
Rhizomatic Learning: “As… When… and If…” A Strategy for the ASEAN Community in the 21st Century Lian, Andrew; Pineda, Maria Victoria
BEYOND WORDS Vol 2, No 1 (2014)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

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Abstract

The article begins with developments in the ASEAN region. In particular, it focuses on demands generated by the goal to build an ASEAN Community characterized by great diversity amongst member countries. The demands created by this diversity are exacerbated by the immense changes taking place in the 21st century, such as unprecedented richness of information and communication systems, unprecedented mobility and the technological empowerment of ordinary people to create or find their own personal solutions in a just in time, just enough and just for me fashion. This leads to the conclusion that learning needs will be vastly different, individual and largely unpredicted and unpredictable. This realisation implies the necessity to develop adaptable, flexible, yet intellectually coherent learning frameworks which will provide the necessary guidance for creating appropriate learning environments. The article proceeds to construct such a framework on the basis of a five-point analysis of how human perception, understanding and knowledge-construction operate. It then develops a learning structure based on the generation of personal learning environments (PLEs) connected to a networked information technology infrastructure which is essentially rhizomatic in nature (i.e. where learners determine the ways that they navigate through information and feedback mechanisms to construct personally-relevant and appropriate knowledge). The article ends with a short scenario to illustrate the workings of this structure and concludes with some remarks about current research in the area in both Asia and Europe
Conversation Partnerships: An Educational Tool for Cross-Cultural Understanding Kasten, Wendy C; Dagistan, Murat; Sarikaya, Vildan
BEYOND WORDS Vol 2, No 1 (2014)
Publisher : Widya Mandala Catholic University Surabaya

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Abstract

This article describes one study of conversation partnerships between American students enrolled in teacher education programs, and international students enrolled at the same large midwestern university. Twenty-nine pairs of partners during one 15-week semester were directed to meet at least 10 times minimally 30 minutes each. Topics for initial meetings were recommended, to help partners get started. As the semester progressed, topics were based on interests and needs of the partners. Three data sources were collected and analyzed. International students were surveyed at the end of the program with demographic and open-ended question about their perceived outcomes of the experience. American students were required to keep and submit weekly logs of the meetings and their thoughts about the meeting. These students were further required to write an end-semester reflection paper, exploring their learning in areas of: better understanding the English language; learning about other cultures; and any other meaningful insights about the experience. These latter two data sources were analyzed qualitatively, using constant comparative analysis. Results of the study, overall, were positive with interesting insights from participants. International students reported improving their English. American students had their “eyes opened” repeatedly about other cultures. Many of the partners reported the forming on genuine and hopefully sustainable friendships. Often, the partnerships went beyond the course requirements spending evenings, or weekend days together.