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Dr. agr. Wahyudi David
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Asia Pacific Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy
Published by Universitas Bakrie
ISSN : -     EISSN : -     DOI : -
Asia Pacific Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy (APJSAFE), publish two times a year, publish papers in English reporting the results of original research in the following areas: Sustainable Agriculture, Food Technology and Sustainable Nutrition, Community Development and Scientific Communication, and Other related topics deemed relevant by the Editorial Board (Special Issues)
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 45 Documents
The Impact of Market Power on Soybean Price in Indonesia Arnawa, I Ketut; Tamba, I Made; Anindita, Ratya
Asia Pacific Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Vol 3, No 1 (2015)
Publisher : Asia Pacific Network for Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Network (SAFE Network)

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Abstract

The purpose of this study is to analyze the impact of the market power on soybeans price. This study uses data from time series (1989-2008) were analyzed by the model approach of oligopoly Appelbaum - Schroeter. The study found that market power have a significant impact on the increase in prices in the market of soybeans, the market power have a considerable impact on the increase in prices to the wholesale entry soybeans industry, but relatively little impact on the rise in prices of soybeans products processed as industrial production. Therefore, the policies of prices established by the Government has to take into account the forces of the market, pricing policies will be less effective in elasticity conjectural is relatively high, demand is highly inelastic, and the market is the proper functioning of the policy. Keywords: Marketing, soybean, market power, industry, conjectural elasticity 
Ethnobotanical Study of Edible Ferns Used in Bali Indonesia Sujarwo, Wawan; Lugrayasa, Nyoman; Caneva, Giulia
Asia Pacific Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Vol 2, No 2 (2014): Global Action For Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy
Publisher : Asia Pacific Network for Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Network (SAFE Network)

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Abstract

With very few exception ferns have not been widely used as sources of food and medicine. An ethnobotanical study was conducted to investigate Balinese ethnobotanical knowledge of edible ferns. We interviewed fifty informants of different age, sex, and villages to obtain information on traditional knowledge of edible ferns. Investigations were made by interrogating village leaders, religious leaders, farmers, and elderly people. The study has resulted in the documentation of 4 edible fern species. These species were distributed across 3 families and 3 genera. Woodsiaceae was the dominant family (2 species, Diplazium esculentum (Retz.) Swartz and Diplazium repandum Bl.), followed by Blechnaceae (Blechnum orientale L.) and Thelypteridaceae (Pneumatopteris callosa (Blume) Nakai.). All species were green vegetables. Pneumatopteris callosa is also used for treatment of various ailments like fever and hypertension. Documentation of these species may provide basic information for conservation, possibly further exploitation, and will preserve local traditional knowledge.Keywords— ethnobotany, traditional knowledge, edible ferns, pteridophytes, Bali
Selenium Recovery and Conversion by a Filamentous Fungus, Aspergillus oryzae Strain RIB40 Kimura, Hiromi; Arima, Toshi-Hide; Oku, Takashi; Sakaguchi, Toshifumi
Asia Pacific Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Vol 2, No 2 (2014): Global Action For Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy
Publisher : Asia Pacific Network for Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Network (SAFE Network)

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Abstract

A filamentous fungus (koji mold), Aspergillus oryzae strain RIB40 could be applied for selenium recovery and conversion. The granular cell-aggregates (mycelial cells) were able to reduce and convert selenite into nano-sized elemental selenium depositions when the granules were incubated under aerobic condition shaking at 120 rpm with a 100 ml baffled Erlenmeyer flask contained 20 ml of PD (potato dextrose) medium. In the aerobic condition, selenite (1 mM) was removed completely (over 99 %) from the culture within 24 hours by the mycelial cell-granules of strain RIB40. The cells turned red-orange due to the formation of elemental selenium nanospheres. Results of total selenium quantity determination in the red-orange coloured cellular granules by the atomic absorption method showed that most of selenite which disappeared from the culture were recovered to the granular cell-aggregates. These results demonstrate that a filamentous fungus, Aspergillus oryzae strain RIB40 can be used as an effective bio-material for recovery and reduction, and conversion of selenium-oxyanion in bioremediation, elemental resource recycling, biomineralization and biofabrication.Keywords— Aspergillus oryzae, Selenite reduction, Selenium recovery. 
Effect of Fat Extraction Treatment on The Physicochemical Properties of Duck Feet Collagen and Its Application in Surimi Yiin, Tan Ai; Huda, Nurul; Ariffin, Fazilah; Easa, Azhar Mat
Asia Pacific Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Vol 2, No 2 (2014): Global Action For Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy
Publisher : Asia Pacific Network for Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Network (SAFE Network)

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Abstract

Duck feet were the byproduct or waste from the duck meat production and the duck feet collagen was evaluated as an alternative Halal collagen to improve the quality of surimi based-product. Duck feet collagen was extracted by treated the duck feet with 5% lactic acid and 36 hours soaking periods. Alcohol (methanol-MDFC, ethanol-EDFC and 1-butanol-BDFC) is used to reduce the fat content in the duck feet collagen. 1-butanol showed the lowest level of fat content than other two alcohol defatted treatments. The yield of BDFC obtained from this treatment was 9.59%. The BDFC was light (90.40) in color. The swelling percentage of BDFC was 216.66%. There were 20 of amino acids detected in all duck feet collagen treated by different alcohol defatted treatments and the BDFC consist of 53.900 mg/g (19.21%) imino acids. Duck feet collagen was added to sardine surimi to study its effect on physicochemical properties. Duck feet collagen was able to improve the folding test score of sardine surimi from 3.00 to 5.00.  Sardine surimi added with BDFC has the lowest cooking loss (2.46%), highest gel strength (2601.51 g.mm), and highest hardness (6.98 kg) value. Duck feet collagen has the ability to enhance the quality of low grade sardine surimi and its effect is better than bovine and fish collagen. Keywords— Poultry waste, duck feet, collagen extraction, fat reduction, physicochemical properties
Melaleuca cajuputi leaf and branch extracts decreased weeds growth and weeds density in corn field. Nakmee, Pattarawadee Sumthong; Techapinyawat, Sombun; Ngamprasit, Supranee
Asia Pacific Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Vol 2, No 3 (2014): Global Action For Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy
Publisher : Asia Pacific Network for Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Network (SAFE Network)

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Abstract

Products from organic agriculture were accepted for food safety, less environmental impact, enrich nutrition and probably more tasty than products from chemical agriculture.  Plant natural products which are numerous sources for allelopathy effect were interested to discovery new herbicides for organic agriculture. Plant which mostly found in fresh water mangrove forest, Melaleuca cajuputi, was used to determine the reduction of weeds. The result indicated that these extracts inhibited all tested weed species.  Thus, this experiment was focused on the effect of Melaleuca cajuputi leaf and branch extracts on the reduction of weeds growth and weeds density in corn field.  Eight weed species; Vernonia cinerea, Merremia hederacea, Cyperus rotundus, Ipomcea aquatic, Dactyloctenium aegyptium, Rottboellia cochinchinensis, Amaranthus viridis and Commelina diffusa in corn field experiment were evaluated.  Melaleuca cajuputi leaf and branch extracts of 10 and 15% were applied in field soil for 7 days before corn seeds growing and were sprayed every 7 days on soil surface until 60 days.  Weeds dry weight and weeds density were evaluated at 30, 60, 90 and 120 days.  The result showed that Melaleuca cajuputi leaf and branch extracts decreased weeds growth and weeds density.  The highest growth and density reductions were found at 15% of Melaleuca cajuputi leaf extract.  The mixture of Melaleuca cajuputi leaf and branch grind at the concentration of 4 kg/9 m2 showed less reduction on weeds growth and weeds density than 15% of Melaleuca cajuputi leaf extract.  However, Melaleuca cajuputi leaf and branch extracts and grind not affected to corn growth and productivity.Keywords—Melaleuca cajuputi; weed reduction; corn field; allelopathy  
Phenomenon on Fishing Down Marine Food Web in East Coast Gulf of Thailand Juntaropakorn, Methee; Yakupitiyage, Amararatne
Asia Pacific Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Vol 2, No 3 (2014): Global Action For Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy
Publisher : Asia Pacific Network for Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Network (SAFE Network)

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Abstract

Several studies presented the occurrence of fishing down the marine food web in different part of the world including Thailand. Some data from Gulf of Thailand were conducted from 1966-1982 and 1977-1997 which showed a decline in the mean trophic level but did not determined the subsequence trends. Therefore, this study was focus on the analyzing of trend in trophic level and fishing-in-balance index to determine the effect of fishing and other factors. The data of trawl survey from 1988-2007 and the data of fish landing from 1990-2007 which used in this study derived from the department of fisheries, Thailand. Base on number of species or groups composition, hierachical cluster was analyzed using 10 trawl stations resulted in two main clusters covered province of Rayong, Chanthaburi and Trad. The data indicated that from 1988 to 2007, mean trophic level decreased from 3.28 to 3.10 (decline 0.09/decade) in cluster1 and 3.27 to 3.13 (decline 0.07/decade) in cluster 2. The fishing-in-balance index was above zero in the early 1990s but later on values were mostly below zero. The significantly decrease of mean trophic level, catch per unit effort (CPUE) and total landing in cluster 1 supported the fishing down marine food web phenomenon in the East Coast Gulf of Thailand. Data analyzed indicated that it was fishing down marine food web in the East Coast Gulf of Thailand consistent with the trend has been reported. By the concept of fishing down marine food web, 4 phases were classified; phase 1 was high catch of species with high mean trophic level (TLm), phase 2 was low catch of specieswith high TLm, phase 3 was high catch of species with low TLm and phase 4 was low catch of species with low TLm. The analyzed data were evaluated that fishery in the East Coast Gulf of Thailand was classified in phase 3 and eventually reach phase 4 in the near future. Overfishing, particularly of species high level in food chain was the main cause for significantly decreased in observed mean trophic levels. Keywords— Fishing down; Gulf of Thailand; Trawl survey 
Bio-efficacy of Pseudomonas fluorescens (7% WP and 5% SC formulations) against bacterial wilt disease of chili Basu, Amitava
Asia Pacific Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Vol 2, No 2 (2014): Global Action For Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy
Publisher : Asia Pacific Network for Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Network (SAFE Network)

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Abstract

Bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum is an important disease of chili crop in West Bengal. P.  fluorescens was employed to manage R. solanecearum under field condition. The combined use of seed and soil treatment were most effective (0.83 to 10.82% PDI) than sole use of seed or soil treatment (3.33 to 24.98% PDI). Vegetative growth and yield of chili were also influenced through integration of seed and soil treatments with P. fluorescens 7% WP @ 10 g/kg seed + 2.5 kg/ha as well as with P. fluorescens 5% SC applied @ 10 ml/kg seed + 2.5 lit/ha . The seed treatment when followed by soil treatment showed best result in respect of fresh root weight (6.63-7.43 g), dry root weight (2.53-2.80 g), fresh shoot  weight (55.45-60.23 g), dry shoot weight (24.25-26.33 g), plant height (44.83-47.53 cm) and yield (257.18-265.60 kg/ha) than  control. There was no adverse effect of P. fluorescens 7% WP and P. fluorescens 5% SC on soil beneficial microbes. The products increased the root and shoot weight, dry weight of seedlings and seedling vigor index than control. The per cent root colonization in sterilized and non sterilized soil was in the range of 80-89%.It may be concluded that, the combined application of P. fluorescens 7% WP as seed treatment @ 10 g/kg seed + soil treatment @ 2.5 Kg/ha or P. fluorescens 5% SC as seed treatment @ 10 ml/kg seed + soil treatment @ 2.5 lit/ha is suggested for effective management of bacterial wilt of chili. Keywords— Chili, wilt, Ralstonia solanecearum, Pseudomonas flurorescens, biocontrol.
Inhibition of Canker Disease in Selected Citrus Plant by Gelonium multiflorum Extract Khuntong, Soontree; Tangjitjaroenkun, Janpen; Nakmee, Pattarawadee Sumthong
Asia Pacific Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Vol 2, No 3 (2014): Global Action For Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy
Publisher : Asia Pacific Network for Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Network (SAFE Network)

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Abstract

Inhibition of Xanthomonas campestris pv. Citri: the pathogenic bacteria that caused canker disease in citrus plant were studied in lemon leaf by Gelonium multiflora extract. The antimicrobial activity was examined and antioxidant activities of the extracts were compared with ascorbic acid by scavenging effect with 2, 2- diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH). Finally, the extracts were inhibited of canker disease in lemon leaves growing in the greenhouse. Dichloromethane extract of bark was purified by silica gel column with the solvent mixture of dichloromethane:methanol in polarity order from less polar to more polar. The purified fraction with 1:1 ratio at 400 – 500 mg L-1 followed by the ratio 1:9 (dichloromethane:methanol) purified from stem extracts at 500 mg l-1provided the inhibition activities against Xanthomonas campestris pv. Citri. The diameters of clear zone were 20 and 15 mm, respectively. Purified fraction from stem eluted with 1:9 and 3:7, dichloromethane:methanol and purified fraction from bark eluted with 4:6, dichloromethane:methanol provided antioxidant activities with DPPH but lower than ascorbic acid. Purified dichloromethane: methanol; 1:9) at 700 mg L-1 completely inhibited the growth of Xanthomonas campestris pv. Citri. Moreover, purified fraction of bark with dichloromethane:methanol; 2:3) at 500 mg L-1 partially inhibited. All purified fractions (from column chromatography) of bark extract presented higher inhibition activities against Xanthomonas campestris pv. Citri than stem extracts of Gelonium multiflora.Keywords— Inhibition; Xanthomonas campestris pv. Citri; canker disease; Gelonium multiflora; antioxidant activities  
Developing Concept of Customary Based Tree Tenure to maintaining Tree in North Sumatera Indonesia Martial, Tri -; Asaad, Mhd
Asia Pacific Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Vol 2, No 3 (2014): Global Action For Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy
Publisher : Asia Pacific Network for Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Network (SAFE Network)

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Abstract

Abstract— The research aims to develop the concept of tree tenure-based Dalihan na tolu custom in the management of trees on public land in South Tapanuli. This study became the basis to develop the management systems to encourage people planting and maintaining trees as a clarity of tree tenure systems. Tree tenure systems relating to the local rules, which is influenced by customary rules. In the long term it is important to address the environmental damage caused by the trees felling. The concept of land and tree tenure  systems based Dalihan na tolu custom, which can be the basis of tree management policy on public land. Results illustrate that the role of local communities in the Dalihan na Natolu customary system decrease in land and trees management. The development of the tenure concept-based of indigenous peoples need a cearly structuring in variety of roles. Differentiation of the indigenous peoples role in managing land and tree resources required in a well-established institution that aims to strengthen claims the rights of the common interest. Keywords: Land and tree tenure, Dalihan na tolu, security of tenure, local institutions
Establishment of Rural Enterprises Using Multi-Commodity Solar Tunnel Dryer through the Application of Social Laboratory Concept as a Sustainable Technology Transfer Strategy in the Philippines Martinez, Helen; Castillo, Priscilla; Gamalog, Danilo
Asia Pacific Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Vol 2, No 3 (2014): Global Action For Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy
Publisher : Asia Pacific Network for Sustainable Agriculture, Food and Energy Network (SAFE Network)

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Abstract

The social laboratoryconcept as a sustainable technology transfer strategy was developed andapplied  in the establishment of ruralenterprises using the multi-commodity solar tunnel dryer (MCSTD. This is inorder to improve productivity and income of micro-enterprises engaged inprocessing and drying of agricultural and fishery products. First, the roles ofstakeholders and resources needed to hasten the adoption of MCSTD wereestablished. Coaching and mentoring of new MCSTD adopters followed to strengthentheir technical capability on proper drying of agricultural products, theoperation of the solar dryer, and on managing their businesses.  Finally, the enterprises were monitored interms of technical, socio-economic, financial viability, and their contributionto the community. Results showed that the social laboratory concept was aneffective technology transfer strategy. It played major role in theestablishment of new MCSTD-based enterprises in the different regions in thePhilippines.  A total of 15 newenterprises were established and 3 of the enterprises were found to betechnically, economically and financially viable. The use of MCSTD generatedincome for the enterprises, facilitated the creation of new enterprise,introduced unique products in the market, and increased demand of rawmaterials. Moreover, the solar drying technology was found very technicallyefficient, cost efficient, environmentally sound generating employment forpeople in the community.Keywords – solar drying, social laboratory, technology transfer, rural enterprise.**Additional information article available at page 36-40 Vol.2 No.3