cover
Contact Name
-
Contact Email
-
Phone
-
Journal Mail Official
-
Editorial Address
-
Location
Kota adm. jakarta selatan,
Dki jakarta
INDONESIA
Atom Indonesia Journal
ISSN : -     EISSN : -     DOI : -
Core Subject : Science,
Exist for publishing the results of research and development in nuclear science and technology Starting for 2010 Atom Indonesia published three times a year in April, August, and December The scope of this journal covers experimental and analytical research in all areas of nuclear science and technology. including nuclear physics, reactor physics, radioactive waste treatment, fuel element development, radioisotopes and radio pharmaceutical engineering, nuclear and radiation safety, neutron scattering, material science and technology, as well as utilization of isotopes and radiation in agriculture, industry, health and environment.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 6 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 35, No 1 (2009): January 2009" : 6 Documents clear
Modified Starch of Sorghum Mutant Line Zh-30 for High Fiber Muffin Products Santosa, D.D.S.; Human, S.
Atom Indonesia Vol 35, No 1 (2009): January 2009
Publisher : PPIKSN-BATAN

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (61.909 KB) | DOI: 10.17146/aij.2009.43

Abstract

Sorghum mutant line Zh-30 is a breeding line developed at the Center for the Application of Isotope and Radiation Technology, BATAN by using mutation techniques. Gamma irradiation with the dose of 300 Gy was used to induce sorghum genetic variation. Through selection processes in several generations, the mutant line Zh-30 was identified to have better agronomic characteristics, better grain quality and higher grain yield than the original variety. Research on modified starch quality of this mutant line was done to identify its potential use in food industry. Functionality of pregelatinized, hydroxypropyl and crosslinked starch of this mutant line (Mutant TexInstant 30) has been studied for its use in high fiber muffin products. Characteristics of high fiber muffins containing 1.50; 3.50 and 5.50% of Mutant Tex-Instant 30 replacement levels to wheat flour were evaluated using both sensory panel and physical test methods. With regard to the sensory parameters, the high fiber muffins containing 1.50 - 5.50 % Mutant Tex-Instant 30 in general were not significantly different compared to the standard reference muffin. Results of physical evaluations showed that all Mutant Tex-Instant 30 containing products retained more moisture during baking than the standard reference. Tenderness of all products decreased at similar rate following 24 and 48 hr of room temperature storage and seven days at freezer temperature. These results suggested that sorghum mutant line Zh-30 starch could be modified and potentially used in food industry as a subtitute of wheat flour. Received: 26 June 2008; Revised:27 August: 2008; Accepted: 22 December 2008
The Mechanism of Mg2Al3 Formation by Mechanical Alloying Suwarno, H.; Adi, W.A.; Insani, A.
Atom Indonesia Vol 35, No 1 (2009): January 2009
Publisher : PPIKSN-BATAN

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (215.783 KB) | DOI: 10.17146/aij.2009.44

Abstract

Synthetic and characterization of the Mg2Al3 formation by mechanical alloying have been carried out using a high energy ball milling process. Mechanical alloying is a technique of solid state reactions among two or more metals to form a new alloy through the deformation properties of the metals. The Mg2Al3 alloy was formed by milling the individual constituents using a high energy ball milling under the varied milling time of 10, 20 and 30 h. The refinement results on the x-ray diffraction analysis show that the observation and calculation are fit to each other. After milling for 10, 20 and 30 h the mixed Mg and Al metals are converted into Mg2Al3 at the composition of 71.82, 90.73 and 96.19 wt%. It is concluded that the Mg2Al3 alloy can be performed by high energy mechanical alloying after 30 h of milling. The mechanism of the Mg2Al3 formation is discussed. Received: 14 August 2008; Revised:12 November 2008; Accepted: 11 December 2008
Measurements of Residual Stresses in Cold-Rolled 304 Stainless Steel Plates Using X-Ray Diffraction with Rietveld Refinement Method Parikin, Parikin; Killen, P.; Rafterry, A.
Atom Indonesia Vol 35, No 1 (2009): January 2009
Publisher : PPIKSN-BATAN

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (517.89 KB) | DOI: 10.17146/aij.2009.45

Abstract

The determination of the residual stresses using X-ray powder diffraction in a series of cold-rolled 304 stainless steel plates, deforming 0, 34, 84, 152, 158, 175 and 196 % reduction in thickness has been carried out. The diffraction data were analyzed using the Rietveld structure refinement method. The analysis shows that for all specimens, the martensite particles are closely in compression and the austenite matrix is in tension. Both the martensite and austenite, for a sample reducing 34% in thickness (containing of about 1% martensite phase) the average lattice strains are anisotropic and decrease approximately exponential with an increase in the corresponding percent reduction (essentially phase content). It is shown that this feature can be qualitatively understood by taking into consideration the thermal expansion mismatch between the martensite and austenite grains. Also, for all cold-rolled stainless steel specimens, the diffraction peaks are broader than the unrolled one (instrumental resolution), indicating that the strains in these specimens are inhomogeneous. From an analysis of the refined peak shape parameters, the average root-mean square strain, which describes the distribution of the inhomogeneous strain field, was predicted. The average residual stresses in cold-rolled 304 stainless steel plates showed a combination effect of hydrostatic stresses of the martensite particles and the austenite matrix.Received: 14 March 2008; Revised: 13 October 2008; Accepted: 6 November 2008
Geothermal Reservoir Characterization for Steam Field Management in Kamojang Geothermal Field-West Java Abidin, Z.; Prasetio, R.; Prayoto, Prayoto
Atom Indonesia Vol 35, No 1 (2009): January 2009
Publisher : PPIKSN-BATAN

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (212.683 KB) | DOI: 10.17146/aij.2009.46

Abstract

Kamojang is the first geothermal field in Indonesia with a vapor dominated system reservoir. Kamojang has been exploited for over 20 years producing about 1100 tons/hour of steam which is equivalent to 140 Mwe electricity energy. This research is aimed to study the reservoir character after 20 years of exploitation and to investigate the effect of reinjection as a artificial recharge for steam input in the future and also the nature of secondary processes in the reservoir using isotope geochemistry tools. The research is conducted by natural isotopes (18O, 2H and 3H) analysis of many sources of water (meteoric, cold spring, fumaroles and shallow groundwater) in the surrounding of Kamojang field and also fluid reservoir to establish fluid reservoir origins and isotopic composition. Gas analysis and isotopes monitoring on the 25 production wells have been conducted every 2-3 years intervals for more than 10 years to investigate the effect of exploitation to the reservoir performance. Tritium radiotracer test with 370 GBq (10 Ci) activity was conducted at the KMJ 15 reinjection well to determine qualitatively and quantitatively the flow of reinjection water to its surrounding producing well (KMJ 11, 14, 17, 18, 26, 17 and 30). Data interpretation and evaluation to determine reinjection water mass recovery and cooling prediction modeling were conducted using ICEBOX program package (TRINV and TRCOOL). Interpretation and evaluation of data concluded that reservoir fluid of Kamojang geothermal field was originated from meteoric water which infiltrated through fault structures at elevation of 1350 m –1650 m above sea level. There is no evidence that the fluid was originated from magmatic water. Reservoir fluid moved both laterally and vertically (deep fluid) with lateral fluid movement from west to the east. The isotope data analysis indicated there is water entry in west-northwest reservoir boundary. Water entry gradually moved from northwest to the southeast (through wells of KMJ 42, 40, 27, 26 and 28). Exploitation effect to ten of the observation wells shows a decrease in w/r ratio and liquid saturation from 35 % in the beginning to about 20,5 % on the average after 20 years of operation. Evaluation with TRINV and TRCOOL program shows that 13,5 % of water reinjected into KMJ 15 reinjection well was recovered in the surrounding production wells. The program model of the reservoir temperature cooling shows that water reinjection with flow rate of 10 kg/sec is very save. After 20 years of reinjection activity, the model predicts a production wells will be cooling of about 6.8oC.Received: 15 January 2009; Revised: 1 May 2009; Accepted: 5 May 2009
Hybrid Weakness Found in the Backcross Progeny of an Inter-Specific Cross of Oryza Sativa / O. Glumaepatula Sobrizal, Sobrizal; Yoshimura, A.
Atom Indonesia Vol 35, No 1 (2009): January 2009
Publisher : PPIKSN-BATAN

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (77.132 KB) | DOI: 10.17146/aij.2009.47

Abstract

Hybrid breakdown expressed as sterility or weakness or both in F2 or later generations is considered to be a reproductive barrier between two distantly related taxa. Hybrid breakdown that showed poor growth habit with fertile seeds was found in the backcross progenies (BC4F2) which were derived from a cross between a cultivated rice Oryza sativa L. cv. Taichung 65 and a wild rice Oryza glumaepatula Steud (Acc. IRGC 105668) where Taichung 65 was used as a recurrent parent. Through segregation analysis of BC4F2 population, a novel gene for weakness was identified, and this gene was designated as hwf1 (hybrid weakness f-1). RFLP (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) analysis was employed to determine the chromosomal location of hwf1 gene. The result revealed that hwf1 was located between G3006 and C933 RFLP markers, with map distances of 0.5 cM and 1.9 cM, respectively, and co-segregated with C708, C820, and R288 on the short arm of chromosome 4. Since both O. glumaepatula (Acc. IRGC 105668) and Taichung 65 that was used as parents showed normal growth habit, the weakness in this study was assumed to be controlled by a set of complementary recessive genes. One of the complementary genes is hwf1 from O. glumaepatula, and another gene should be from Taichung 65, because the genetic background of the BC4F2 populations that were used for analysis is Taichung 65. The gene from Taichung 65 has not been identified yet, therefore, it is necessary to conduct the experiment for finding out the complement of hwf1 gene in near future. Received: 20 November 2008; Revised: 15 May 2009; Accepted: 16 May 2009
Surface Roughness and Grain Size Characterization of Annealing Temperature Effect For Growth Gallium and Tantalum Doped Ba0.5 Sr0.5TiO3Thin Film Irzaman, Irzaman; Darmasetiawan, H.; Hardhienata, H.; Hikam, M.; Arifin, P.; Jusoh, S.N.; Taking, S.; Jamal, Z.; Idris, M.A.
Atom Indonesia Vol 35, No 1 (2009): January 2009
Publisher : PPIKSN-BATAN

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (4180.903 KB) | DOI: 10.17146/aij.2009.48

Abstract

Thin films 10 % gallium oxide doped barium strontium titanate (BGST) and 10 % tantalum oxide doped barium strontium titanate (BTST) were prepared on p-type Si (100) substrates using chemical solution deposition (CSD) method with 1.00 M precursor. The films were deposited by spin coating method with spinning speed at 3000 rpm for 30 seconds. The post deposition annealing of the films were carried out in a furnace at 200oC, 240oC, 280oC (low temperature) for 1 hour in oxygen gas atmosphere. The surface roughness and grain size analysis of the grown thin films are described by atomic force microscope (AFM) method at 5000 nm x 5000 nm area. The rms surface roughness BGST thin films at 5000 nm x 5000 nm area are 0.632 nm, 0.564 nm, 0.487 nm for temperature 200oC, 240oC, 280oC, respectively, whereas the grain size (mean diameter) are 238.4 nm, 219.0 nm, 185.1 nm for temperature 200oC, 240oC, 280oC, respectively. In fact, to increase annealing temperature from 200oC to 280oC would result in decreasing the rms roughness and grain size. Therefore, rms roughness and grain size would have the strong correlation annealing temperature. Received: 9 November 2008; Revised: 24 August 2009; Accepted: 25 August 2009

Page 1 of 1 | Total Record : 6


Filter by Year

2009 2009


Filter By Issues
All Issue Vol 45, No 3 (2019): December 2019 Vol 45, No 2 (2019): August 2019 Vol 45, No 1 (2019): April 2019 Vol 44, No 3 (2018): December 2018 Vol 44, No 2 (2018): August 2018 Vol 44, No 1 (2018): April 2018 Vol 43, No 3 (2017): December 2017 Vol 43, No 2 (2017): August 2017 Vol 43, No 1 (2017): April 2017 Vol 42, No 3 (2016): December 2016 Vol 42, No 2 (2016): August 2016 Vol 42, No 1 (2016): April 2016 Vol 41, No 3 (2015): December 2015 Vol 41, No 2 (2015): August 2015 Vol 41, No 1 (2015): April 2015 Vol 40, No 3 (2014): December 2014 Vol 40, No 2 (2014): August 2014 Vol 40, No 1 (2014): April 2014 Vol 39, No 3 (2013): December 2013 Vol 39, No 2 (2013): August 2013 Vol 39, No 1 (2013): April 2013 Vol 38, No 3 (2012): December 2012 Vol 38, No 2 (2012): August 2012 Vol 38, No 1 (2012): April 2012 Vol 37, No 3 (2011): December 2011 Vol 37, No 2 (2011): August 2011 Vol 37, No 1 (2011): April 2011 Vol 36, No 3 (2010): December 2010 Vol 36, No 2 (2010): August 2010 Vol 36, No 2 (2010): : AUGUST 2010 Vol 36, No 1 (2010): April 2010 Vol 35, No 2 (2009): July 2009 Vol 35, No 1 (2009): January 2009 Vol 34, No 2 (2008): July 2008 Vol 34, No 1 (2008): January 2008 Vol 33, No 2 (2007): July 2007 Vol 33, No 1 (2007): January 2007 Vol 32, No 2 (2006): July 2006 Vol 32, No 1 (2006): January 2006 Vol 31, No 2 (2005): July 2005 Vol 31, No 1 (2005): January 2005 Vol 30, No 2 (2004): July 2004 Vol 30, No 1 (2004): January 2004 Vol 16, No 1 (1990): JANUARY 1990 ARTICLE IN PRESS More Issue