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INDONESIA
Atom Indonesia Journal
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Core Subject : Science,
Exist for publishing the results of research and development in nuclear science and technology Starting for 2010 Atom Indonesia published three times a year in April, August, and December The scope of this journal covers experimental and analytical research in all areas of nuclear science and technology. including nuclear physics, reactor physics, radioactive waste treatment, fuel element development, radioisotopes and radio pharmaceutical engineering, nuclear and radiation safety, neutron scattering, material science and technology, as well as utilization of isotopes and radiation in agriculture, industry, health and environment.
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Articles 3 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 30, No 1 (2004): January 2004" : 3 Documents clear
The use of 32P and 15N to Estimate Fertilizer Efficiency in Oil Palm Sisworo, Elsje L.; Sisworo, Widjang H.; Rasjid, Havid; Haryanto, Haryanto; Rizal, Syamsul; Poeloengan, Z.; Martoyo, Kusnu
Atom Indonesia Vol 30, No 1 (2004): January 2004
Publisher : PPIKSN-BATAN

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (61.944 KB) | DOI: 10.17146/aij.2004.141

Abstract

Oil palm has become an important commodity for Indonesia reaching an area of 2.6 million ha at the end of 1998. It is mostly cultivated in highly weathered acid soil usually Ultisols and Oxisols which are known for their low fertility, concerning the major nutrients like N and P. This study most conducted to search for the most active root-zone of oil palm and applied urea fertilizer at such soils to obtain high N-efficiency. Carrier free KH232PO4 solution was used to determine the active root-zone of oil palm by applying 32P around the plant in twenty holes. After the most active root-zone have been determined, urea in one, two and three splits were respectively applied at this zone. To estimate N-fertilizer efficiency of urea labelled 15N Ammonium Sulphate was used by adding them at the same amount of 16 g 15N plant-1. This study showed that the most active root-zone was found at a 1.5 m distance from the plant-stem and at 5 cm soil depth. For urea the highest N-efficiency was obtained from applying it  at  two splits. The use of 32P was able to distinguish several root zones: 1.5 m – 2.5 m from the plant-stem at a 5 cm and 15 cm soil depth. Urea placed at the most active root-zone, which was at a 1.5 m distance from the plant-stem and at a 5 cm depth in one, two, and three splits respectively showed difference N-efficiency. The highest N-efficiency of urea was obtained when applying it in two splits at the most active root-zone.
Radiation Yield and Radicals Produced in Irradiated Poly (Butylene Succinate) Suhartini, Meri; Yoshii, Fumio; Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Mitomo, Hiroshi
Atom Indonesia Vol 30, No 1 (2004): January 2004
Publisher : PPIKSN-BATAN

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (101.936 KB) | DOI: 10.17146/aij.2004.211

Abstract

The main chemical effects of ionizing irradiation on polymers are crosslinking and chain scission. Both processes occur simultaneously and their yields determine the final results of processing. The radiation yield of crosslinking could be determined by several methods depending on the characteristics of the material and properties of the gel. Radiation parameters of gelation, such as gelation dose and ratio of scission yield to crosslinking yield, as well as their values were estimated. In this study, those parameters depend on the amount of Trimethallyl isocyanurate (TMAIC) in Poly(butylene succinate) (PBS), molecular weight of PBS, and irradiation condition. In the absence of TMAIC, higher molecular weight of PBS required less energy to start gelation process compare to lower molecular weight of PBS. While in the presence of TMAIC all of the PBS samples require similar energy to start gelation process. The existence of macroradicals were observed by Electron Spin Resonance measurements. The result showed that the spectra consisted of signals derived from radicals on carbon nearby carbonyl, and signals derived from radicals on carbon reside between two similar carbon on polymer, both of radicals lead to crosslinking.
Analysis of Neutron Flux Distribution in Rsg-Gas Reactor With U-Mo Fuels Taryo, Taswanda; Sembiring, T.M.
Atom Indonesia Vol 30, No 1 (2004): January 2004
Publisher : PPIKSN-BATAN

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (121.855 KB) | DOI: 10.17146/aij.2004.212

Abstract

The use of U-Mo fuels in research reactors seems to be promising and, recently, world researchers have carried out these such activities actively. The National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN) which owns RSG-GAS reactor available in Serpong Research Center for Atomic Energy should anticipate this trend. It is, therefore, this research work on the use of U-Mo fuels in RSG-GAS reactor should be carried out. The work was focused on the analysis of neutron flux distribution in the RSG-GAS reactor using different content of molybdenum in U-Mo fuels. To begin with, RSG-GAS reactor core model was developed and simulated into X, Y and Z dimensions. Cross section of materials based on the developed cells of standard and control fuels was then generated using WIMS-D5-B. The criticality calculations were finally carried out applying BATAN-2DIFF code. The results showed that the neutron flux distribution obtained in U-Mo-fuel-based RSG-GAS core is very similar to those achieved in the 300-gram sillicide-fuel-based RSG-GAS reactor core. Indeed, the utilization of the U-Mo RSG-GAS core can be very similar to that of the high-density sillicide reactor core and even could be better in the future.

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