HAYATI Journal of Biosciences
ISSN : 19783019     EISSN : -
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences (HAYATI J Biosci) publishes articles and short communication in tropical bioscience fields such as development, biotechnology, biodiversity and environmental issues. HAYATI J Biosci covers wide range of all life forms topics including virus, microbes, fungi, plants, animal and human. HAYATI J Biosci has been also indexed/registered in Crossref, DOAJ, CABI, EBSCO, Agricola and ProQuest.
Articles 605 Documents
Red Guava Leaf Harvesting Impact on Flavonoid Optimation in Different Growth Phases AZIZ, SANDRA ARIFIN; GHULAMAHDI, MUNIF
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol 18, No 2 (2011): June 2011
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (60.711 KB) | DOI: 10.4308/hjb.18.2.97

Abstract

Harvesting process is a critical time to identify the quality of raw material for traditional medicine. The time and harvesting techniques, drying process after harvesting, and processing to make the simplicia, are the crucial role to make the good quality of the natural product. On the other hand, there is a lack of general understanding and appreciation about the processes involved in governing shoot and tree growth and development, i.e. red guava.  The research objective was to evaluate the influence of leaf harvesting and growth phases on red guava for flavonoid production as antioxidant. Randomized factorial block design in time were laid out with two factors and followed by Duncan’s multiple range test. The treatments were the amount of leaf  harvested on tertiary branches (0, 25, 50, and 100%) and growth phases of the plant (vegetative and generative). Leaf harvesting 25% on tertiary branches significantly increased the leaf number (766.3 tree-1) and the number of new quarternary branches, decreasing leaf area index (LAI) and leaf dry weight at the end of the experiment (22 weeks of observation/WO).  The highest leaf dry weight (156.94 g tree-1) and LAI (0.47) was found in harvesting 25% tertiary branches.  Harvesting 100% leaf on tertiary branches in vegetative phase significantly produced the lowest flavonoid production (7.82 g tree-1). The result suggested that flavonoid production from red guava leaves should be done by harvesting 50% leaf on tertiary branches in generative phase can be used to produce the highest flavonoid (89.90 g tree-1).
Increasing of Plasma Cholecystokinin Level and Jejunum Histological Changes After Treatment with Soybean Extracts Protein HIDAYAT, MEILINAH; LADI, JEANNY ERVIE
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol 19, No 2 (2012): June 2012
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (125.36 KB) | DOI: 10.4308/hjb.19.2.53

Abstract

It is well known that soybean has beneficial health effects. There are lot of active compounds in soybean, like protein and anti nutrition factors (ANF). Trypsin inhibitor and lectin, two kinds of ANF have an adverse effect on the morphology and function of digestive tract in animals. b-conglycinin in soybean protein, has been proven  has reducing body weight effect through increasing cholecystokinin (CCK) level. The aim of this study was to measure plasma CCK level and the histological changes of jejunum in Wistar rats after treatment with protein extract of Willis raw soybean (PEWS), protein extract of Detam 1 raw soybean (PEDS) and protein extract of Detam 1 tempeh (PEDT) for 14 days. This study was also to ascertain whether b-conglycinin and ANF contribute  to  reducing body weight by giving PEWS, PEDS, and PEDT to 4 groups of 6 rats for 14 days. We observed food intake, body weight, CCK level, and histological profile of jejunum. As a conclusion, PEWS, PEDS, and PEDT treatment to Wistar Rats  for 14 days caused increasing CCK plasma level and jejunum villi atrophy. The reducing body weight is caused not only by b-conglycinin but probably by ANF as well.
Association of Sexual Maturation and Body Size of Arfak Children KAWULUR, ELDA IRMA JEANNE JOICE; SURYOBROTO, BAMBANG; BUDIARTI, SRI; HARTANA, ALEX
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol 19, No 3 (2012): September 2012
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (180.56 KB) | DOI: 10.4308/hjb.19.3.124

Abstract

Gonad maturation in pubertal girls and boys is accompanied with somatic growth spurt, changes in quantity and distribution of body fat (BF), development of secondary sex characters, and relevant physiological events. Menarche (first event of menstruation) and spermarche (first event of nocturnal sperm emission) are usually used as indicators of gonad maturation. We found that median age at menarche of Arfak girls in Manokwari, West Papua is 12.2 years, while median age at spermarche of boys is 13.6 years. A possible factor causing young age at menarche is due to adaptation to unstable environmental conditions because of high risk of mortality by malaria disease during childhood. The events of menarche and spermarche achieved one year after the peak body height (BH) velocity, and just before or at the same time with the time of maximum growth rate of body weight (BW), body mass index (BMI), and BF. The average BMI of Arfak girls was big at 21.9 kg/m2 at the time of their menarche. Bigger average BMI might be caused by prepubertal slowing down of BH growth compare to growth of BW whichis still increasing. Girls accumulate BF before puberty to be used as an energy reserve for the occurrence of menarche. At the time of development of secondary sexual characters girls use the fat reserve so it decline sharply after puberty. In boys, growth rate of BF was stopped at 11 years old, and then growing negatively presumably because boys use fat mass for the occurence of spemarche. BF growth rate reached the lowest point at the age 16 years old, and then increase linearly with age through adolescence until adulthood at age 23 years old.
Population Dynamic of Dendronephthya sp.-Associated Bacteria in Natural and Artificial Habitats SOKA, SUSAN; HUTAGALUNG, RORY ANTHONY; YOGIARA, .; ASSISI, CLARA
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol 18, No 2 (2011): June 2011
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (41.545 KB) | DOI: 10.4308/hjb.18.2.57

Abstract

Dendronephthya sp. is a soft coral that has huge distribution starting from Indopacific, Tonga, Solomon Islands to Great Barrier Reef in Australia. However, this soft corals survive only in short period after cultivation in artificial habitat (aquarium). Recent study showed that the soft coral Dendronephtya sp. has an association or symbiotic relationship with several bacteria, commonly known as coral associated bacteria (CAB). In this study, we compared the population dynamic of Dendronephthya sp.-associated bacteria in natural and artificial habitat, resulting different bacterial community profiles using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of bacterial community DNA. There were 15 main classes of bacterial population identified along with uncultured microorganism, uncultured organism, uncultured bacteria and unidentified organism. Members of Actinobacteria, Arthrobacteria, Chlorobia, Caldilineae, d-proteobacteria and Proteobacteria were predicted to give contributions in the survival ability of both Dendronephthya sp. The cultivation of soft corals after 2 weeks in artificial habitat increases bacterial population similarity on 2 different samples by 10%. Bacterial population similarity in artificial habitat would increase along with the longer cultivation time of soft corals.
Isolation and Characterization of Chelonia mydas Myoglobin SADIKIN, MOHAMAD; PUSPITANINGRUM, RINI; WANANDI, SEPTELIA INAWATI; SOEGIANTO, RONDANG ROEMIATI
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol 19, No 2 (2012): June 2012
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (128.817 KB) | DOI: 10.4308/hjb.19.2.60

Abstract

Green sea turtle – Chelonia mydas is a lung respiration animal that is able to dive and stay uder sea water for hours without needing to surface for oxygen. As oxygen supply in muscles is assured by myoglobin, we propose to study some characteristic of this muscle protein in green sea turtles. To achieve this objective, pure green sea turtle myoglobin has to be made available. Therefore, our first task is to purify this muscle protein from green sea turtles. Skeletal muscles from 3 green sea turtle hatchlings were studied microscopically and biochemically. Microscopy observation showed a general structure of striated muscle. Biochemical studies revealed that green sea turtle myoglobin could be more purely isolated to a certain degree by Sephadex G-75 gel filtration and purified by immunoaffinity gel chromatography rather than direct purification by DEAE-Sepharose ion exchange chromatography technique. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that green sea turtle myoglobin ran together with horse myoglobin as 17 kDa molecular weight proteins
Comparison of DNA Extraction Methods for Microbial Community Analysis in Indonesian Tempe Employing Amplified Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis SEUMAHU, CECILIA ANNA; SUWANTO, ANTONIUS; RUSMANA, IMAN; SOLIHIN, DEDY DURYADI
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol 19, No 2 (2012): June 2012
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (136.378 KB) | DOI: 10.4308/hjb.19.2.93

Abstract

Tempe fermentation involved complex microbial communities which are only revealed partially through culture dependent methods. Culture-independent methods would be potential to unravel this complex microbial fermentation. Appropriate DNA extraction is an essential tool to obtain reliable data from culture independent method. In this study, we employed two commercial DNA extraction methods to find the best one for microbial community characterization employing amplified ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (ARISA). Our result showed that PowerFood Microbial DNA Isolation Kit-MOBIO (PFMDIK) is an excellent method for microbial DNA extraction from tempe. It gave high quantity and quality of DNA suitable for PCR amplification of 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer to yield a diverse and reproducible ARISA profile.
Cryopreservation of Sperm Muhamad Gazali; Surya Natal Tambing
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol 9, No 1 (2002): Hayati Journal of Biosciences
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar

Abstract

Cryopreservation of sperm is a procedure for storaging the suspension of sperm at temperature colder than 00C. Thebasic principle of cryopreservation is the movement of water across cell membranes, both to dehydrate cells prior to freezingand to rehydrate them at thawing. There are two major phenomenons during cryopreservation of sperm i.e., cold shock andthe formation of ice crystals. Cryopreservation also makes sperm susceptible to damage from peroxidation. Besides that,there are anti-freezing factors in the seminal plasma (e.g., egg-yolk coagulating and triglycerol lipase enzyme, and antimotilityfactor) which adversely damage of intracelluler organelles, decrease the motility and metabolism processes, butincrease the process of removing several enzymes out from the cell. In order to minimize cryoinjury in spermatozoa, it isnecessary to consider many factors i.e., use of proper diluent media, types and doses of cryoprotectant, types and doses ofantioxidant, doses of egg-yolk and remove anti-freezing factors in the seminal plasma.
Genetic Diversity of Acacia mangium Seed Orchard in Wonogiri Indonesia Using Microsatellite Markers YUSKIANTI, VIVI; ISODA, KEIYA
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol 19, No 3 (2012): September 2012
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (44.413 KB) | DOI: 10.4308/hjb.19.3.141

Abstract

Genetic diversity is important in tree improvement programs. To evaluate levels of genetic diversity of first generation Acacia mangium seedling seed orchard  in Wonogiri, Central Java, Indonesia, three populations from each region of Papua New Guinea (PNG) and Queensland, Australia (QLD) were selected and analyzed using 25 microsatellite markers. Statistical analysis showed that PNG populations have higher number of detected alleles and level of genetic diversity than QLD populations. This study provides a basic information about the genetic background of the populations used in the development of an A. mangium seed orchard in Indonesia.
Isolation, Characterization, and Cloning of the α-Amylase Gene from Moderately Halophilic Bacteria Isolated from Bledug Kuwu Artini Pangastuti; Dinamella Wahjuningrum; Antonius Suwanto
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol 9, No 1 (2002): Hayati Journal of Biosciences
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar

Abstract

A moderately halophilic bacteria, BK-05, was isolated from Bledug Kuwu, a saline terrestrial area at Central Java. Basedon partial sequence of 16S-rRNA gene, the isolate was closely related to Halobacillus litoralis. This isolate showed amylolyticactivity when grown on saline media [15% (w/v) NaCl] suplemented with starch. A pair of primer was designed based on thesequence of amyH gene from Halomonas meridiana and Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis. PCR amplification using these primersshowed three DNA bands with each size approximately 1.50, 1.00, and 0.75 kb. Partial DNA sequencing analysis based on itsdeduced protein sequence revealed that the 1.50 kb band was closely related to the sequence of metalloprotease from Bacillussubtilis (approximately 54.3% identity in 184 amino acid overlap). Southern hybridization analysis showed that the 1.50 kbfragment was located within a 4.0 kb fragment of BamHI, 4.8 kb of EcoRI, 4.3 kb of HindIII, and 4.0 kb of XhoI digestion ofBK-05 genomic DNA, respectively.
Selection and Characterization of Endophytic Bacteria as Biocontrol Agents of Tomato Bacterial Wilt Disease NAWANGSIH, ABDJAD ASIH; DAMAYANTI, IKA; WIYONO, SURYO; KARTIKA, JUANG GEMA
HAYATI Journal of Biosciences Vol 18, No 2 (2011): June 2011
Publisher : Bogor Agricultural University, Indonesia

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (100.687 KB) | DOI: 10.4308/hjb.18.2.66

Abstract

Biological control of bacterial wilt pathogen (Ralstonia solanacearum) of tomato using endophytic bacteria is one of the alternative control methods to support sustainable agriculture. This study was conducted to select and characterize endophytic bacteria isolated from healthy tomato stems and to test their ability to promote plant growth and suppress bacterial wilt disease. Among 49 isolates successfully isolated, 41 were non-plant pathogenic. Green house test on six selected isolates based on antagonistic effect on R. solanacearum or ability to suppress R. solanacearum population in dual culture assays obtained BC4 and BL10 isolates as promising biocontrol agents.  At six weeks after transplanting, plants treated with BC4 isolate showed significantly lower disease incidence (33%) than that of control (83%). Plants height was not significantly affected by endophytic bacterial treatments. Based on 16S rRNA sequence, BC4 isolate had 97% similarity with Staphylococcus epidermidis (accession number EU834240.1), while isolate BL10 had 98% similarity with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain JK-SD002 (accession number AB547229.1).

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