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Contact Name
Paramita Atmodiwirjo
Contact Email
paramita@eng.ui.ac.id
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Journal Mail Official
interiority@eng.ui.ac.id
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Kota depok,
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INDONESIA
Interiority
Published by Universitas Indonesia
ISSN : 26146584     EISSN : 26153386     DOI : -
The journal presents the discourses on interiority from multiple perspectives in various design-related disciplines: architecture, interior design, spatial design, and other relevant fields. The idea of interiority emphasises the internal aspects that make and condition the interior, which might be understood and manifested through the users’ inhabitation, through the materiality of objects and built environment as well as through specific methods and approaches of design practice. The journal addresses the idea of interiority as both experienced and practised, which might be examined through theoretical discussion, spatial design practice and empirical interior research.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 28 Documents
Interiority and The Conditions of Interior Pimlott, Mark
Interiority Vol 1 No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering Universitas Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (301.976 KB) | DOI: 10.7454/in.v1i1.5

Abstract

Interiority pertains to the individual’s inner life, rich and set in opposition to the pressures of the world. This interiority has been allied with notions of the exclusive space or refuge of the interior. As a realm of privacy and subjectivity, of projections and receptions, the interior has come to be considered as a realm that, although profoundly affected by infiltrations of the world without, is ‘responsive’ to the individual at its centre. As such, it is a realm of illusions. However, there is another order of interior, a condition of interior, wherein spaces, settlements and territories are ideological realms of constructed narratives and imagery within which the individual subject is given illusory impressions of freedom. Interiority’s turn toward the imagination suggests that freedoms can be found despite these determinations. Public interiors have the obligation to realise this, and exemplars have offered places for gathering and interaction, promoted freedoms of movement, association and action, and advocated consciousness of the self and others.
Unreliable Guides: Introducing, Mapping and Performing Interiors Hollis, Edward
Interiority Vol 1 No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering Universitas Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (108.275 KB) | DOI: 10.7454/in.v1i1.6

Abstract

Whether as teachers listening to students, as designers ‘pitching’ designs to clients, or critics writing about historical spaces, we use speech and gesture to describe interiors. We assume that the interior does not speak on it’s own, but must be spoken for. How do designers, curators, and guides talk interiors into existence? How, more generally should we speak of the interior? This paper will explore this issue through reflection on three encounters between space, speech and gesture in the form of guided tours of historic interiors. It will frame these questions with four contexts: firstly, the evolution of the historical concept of the guide; secondly, the idea of the interior as portraiture; thirdly, the evolution, particularly in the twentieth century, of performance (particularly theatrical performance) and finally, the distinction between the interior as image, and the interior as inhabitation.
Urban Interiority and the Spatial Processes of Securitisation in Medellin Deluchi, Christina
Interiority Vol 1 No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering Universitas Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (101.084 KB) | DOI: 10.7454/in.v1i1.7

Abstract

Medellín, Colombia, a city best known for its violent history and subsequent radical transformation, hosts multiple political forces of varying degrees of legitimacy. In this context, architecture was mobilised as a physical weapon in the city’s urban regions. As an extension of this architectural condition, the city’s landscape has repeatedly been appropriated and repurposed to enforce state and criminal agency. Medellín’s cultural geography became increasingly unstable as both real and imagined threats lingered in the spaces of every day – apartment towers, gated communities, supermarkets, TV and radio, imbued with violent operational spatial logics. In detecting processes of regulation, protection, and surveillance, the political instrumentality and larger urban implications of interior space in Medellín are revealed through architectural objects and spatial devices of control. As techniques of securitisation, these processes provide evidence for the construction of Medellín’s interiority, an urban condition founded on political violence and withdrawal. The objects and devices of this interiority are often remarkably ordinary, yet they are the political tools that indoctrinate a military-style urbanism that interprets, registers, and shapes territorial conflict. The mobilisation of Medellín’s interiority in the pursuit of power and control has manufactured an urban imaginary governed by the constant threat of violence.
Quasi-Materials and the Making of Interior Atmospheres Sadar, John Stanislav
Interiority Vol 1 No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering Universitas Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (175.503 KB) | DOI: 10.7454/in.v1i1.8

Abstract

In The Architecture of the Well-Tempered Environment, Reyner Banham presents a parable in which, having come across an amount of wood, a nomadic tribe must decide how to use it to keep warm overnight: build a structure or build a fire (and burn the wood as fuel). The first of these uses the materials directly to create an amenable interior condition using the tangible materiality of geometric construction. The second, however, generates heat from combustion, thereby creating an intangible, graduated, thermal interiority, which one can draw deeper into, by moving closer to the fire, or recede from, by moving away. Interior architecture has largely been concerned with achieving shelter and creating an interior atmosphere through the dependability and predictability of physical materials. Less often has interior architecture considered the interiority achieved through the temporal contingency of atmospheric quasi-materials (taking a cue from Tonino Griffero’s quasithings), phenomena such as light, sound, temperature, and humidity. While these often strike one as outside of the realm of designers, their effects profoundly colour our experiences of our environments: the smells of street food, the heat of the metro air exhaust, the veil of fog rolling in. A selection of student projects probing quasi-materials in interior architecture reveals their nature and potential for making interior environments. More akin to building a fire than fitting out a shell, these projects question existing tenets of interior architecture, while they enable types of interiority that are fluid, graduated and temporal.
Tracing the Progression of Inhabitation through Interior Surface in Semarang Old Town Warakanyaka, AA Ayu Suci; Yatmo, Yandi Andri
Interiority Vol 1 No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering Universitas Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1185.917 KB) | DOI: 10.7454/in.v1i1.9

Abstract

The capacity of the interior to adapt and transform through time has made the interior space bears the consequences from its past occupancies. The trails of the past are imprinted within the layers of interior surfaces. This paper argues that by utilising the idea of Anthropocene, these surfaces could become the medium to trace the inhabitation processes that happen throughout the life of the building, whether it was in the past, in the present or to predict the future. In particular, this paper attempts to explore and speculate on the progression of inhabitations through the interior surfaces of the buildings in Semarang Old Town, Central Java, Indonesia. The investigations are presented through the stories of the facades, the paints and the tiles, to reveal how these interior layers narrate the idea of the deep time in which the past inhabitation is embedded. These layers of interior surfaces suggest the role of time and continuous transformation in affecting and producing the current interior spaces. An understanding of deep time, as reflected in the layers of interior surfaces, also suggests the agency of human inhabitation within the transformation of interior space and highlights the ability of interior space to manoeuvre in time.
Tanahku Indonesia: Celebrating the Indigenous Interior Johanes, Mikhael; Wahid, Arif Rahman
Interiority Vol 1 No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering Universitas Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (245.412 KB) | DOI: 10.7454/in.v1i1.10

Abstract

Editorial Atmodiwirjo, Paramita
Interiority Vol 1 No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering Universitas Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (46.998 KB) | DOI: 10.7454/in.v1i1.11

Abstract

Perceptions of Spatiality: Supramodal Meanings and Metaphors in Therapeutic Environments Liddicoat, Stephanie
Interiority Vol 1 No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering Universitas Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (417.524 KB) | DOI: 10.7454/in.v1i2.17

Abstract

This paper explores the perceptions of the spatiality of individuals who self-harm, with the aim of understanding the design aspects which foster supportive therapeutic environments. Analysis of responses found that there were key similarities in areas of perception of architectural interior space, refuting the commonly held view that all architectural response is purely subjective, and that subjective experience cannot be shared. Three examples of perceptions of interior therapeutic environments are discussed to highlight how the perceptions of spatiality of individuals who self-harm consists of a particular cluster of spatial understandings, behaviours and focuses, manifesting as a strong emotional overtone overlaid onto built environments. This includes common kinds of triggers and emotional reactions provoked by aspects of the built environment. This paper discusses architectural aspects in relation to subjectivity in perception, constructs of interiority, and the role of supramodal engagement in influencing perceptual responses to interior space. By understanding how individuals who self-harm experience a space, a greater comprehension of the design of these environments delivering mental health services may be enabled. This paper tables a series of research-derived design suggestions to facilitate supportive therapeutic spaces. This paper also proposes a series of further research directions to explore the relationships between constructs of interiority, the physical interior space, and the therapeutic function for which they are designed.
INsideVisible Cities: Transcending Substance Vrabcheva, Zarya
Interiority Vol 1 No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering Universitas Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (879.685 KB) | DOI: 10.7454/in.v1i2.18

Abstract

The interior, as one of the most human and sensual forms of architecture, is an intimate connection with the built environment and a powerful tool in provoking and altering the human mind, stimulating its curiosity, desires and solutions by way of visible and ambient matter. I aspire to explore the sense of interiority as betweenness, a space of transition in which both the human and the architecture body transcend from one state to another through empathetic interaction. Empathy, besides the ability to feel and experience someone else’s emotions and mental state, also depicts our capacity to feel and experience situations, surroundings and non-living bodies. Interiority encounters three states of empathy in which our capacities of memory, imagination and illusion convey the invisible relationships we have with spaces and inanimate matter. Memory conveys the ability of both humans and space to encapsulate presence, activity and emotion through time. Imagination is our capacity to dream and inject a space with our own vision, shape and create new worlds. Illusion, on the other hand, forms a vigorous relationship with the human being through projecting its character and influence onto our minds. The interiority I seek to illustrate surpasses the rationalities, containment and materiality it is commonly related and rather stimulates curiosity in our being, revealing the qualities of a space as a living organism - growing, living, talking, affecting, absorbing, aging and eventually dying...
Some Distinctive Features of Narrative Environments Austin, Tricia
Interiority Vol 1 No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Department of Architecture Faculty of Engineering Universitas Indonesia

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (583.384 KB) | DOI: 10.7454/in.v1i2.20

Abstract

This paper explores key characteristics of spatial narratives, which are called narrative environments here. Narrative environments can take the form of exhibitions, brand experiences and certain city quarters where stories are deliberately being told in, and through, the space. It is argued that narrative environments can be conceived as being located on a spectrum of narrative practice between media-based narratives and personal life narratives. While watching a screen or reading a book, you are, although often deeply emotionally immersed in a story, always physically ‘outside’ the story. By contrast, you can walk right into a narrative environment, becoming emotionally, intellectually and bodily surrounded by, and implicated in, the narrative. An experience in a narrative environment is, nonetheless, different from everyday experience, where the world, although designed, is not deliberately constituted by others intentionally to imbed and communicate specific stories. The paper proposes a theoretical framework for space as a narrative medium and offers a critical analysis of two case studies of exhibitions, one in a museum and one in the public realm, to support the positioning of narrative environments in the centre of the spectrum of narrative practice.

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