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Ahmadi Riyanto
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INDONESIA
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner
Published by Kementerian Pertanian
ISSN : 08537380     EISSN : 2252696X     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Aims JITV (Jurnal Ilmu ternak dan Veteriner) or Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences (IJAVS) aims to publish original research results and reviews on farm tropical animals such as cattle, buffaloes, sheep, goats, pigs, horses, poultry, as well as non domesticated Indonesian endemic animals, such as deers, anoa, babirusa, etc. Scope Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences . The journal will consider primary research papers from any source if they make an original contribution to the experimental or theoretical understanding and application of theories and methodologies of some aspects of animal science and veterinary
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 509 Documents
The mucosal and systemic immune responses in chickens orally immunised with Campylobacter jejuni antigen entrapped in poly-lactide-co-glycolide microparticles Noor, Susan Maphilindawati
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 3, No 4 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (157.249 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i4.127

Abstract

An oral immunisation in chickens with antigen entrapping in biodegradable microparticles was evaluated in order to achieve optimal antibody responses following oral vaccination. This study was adapted to Campylobacter jejuni antigen in chickens to observe its stimulation both mucosal and systemic immune responses. A group of 5 embryonated chicken eggs was immunised with heat-killed C. jejuni entrapped in poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLG) microparticles at day 17 of incubation deposited into the amniotic fluid. Seven days after hatching the chickens were oral boostered, these was design to as Group A. In the Group B, each embryonated egg was immunised with soluble C. jejuni as in the same as Group A. Immune responses of post vaccination were observed at day-14, the humoral immunity was evaluated with an ELISA and whereas mucosal antibody response was detected by fluorescent histology. The serum IgG and IgA antibody responses, and also the bile and intestinal scrapping IgA antibody responses to campylobacter in Group A were significantly higher than those of the soluble antigen of Group B (P<0.05). Total number of immunoglobulin-containing cells for IgG, IgM, and IgA isotypes in the ileum in Group A chickens were also significantly higher than those of Group B (P<0.05) but was not in the duodenum and spleen. Key words : Campylobacter jejuni, poly-lactide-co-glycolide microparticles, oral immunisation, chickens
Utilization of palm oilsludge in poultry diet: 3. Inclusion of fresh or dried fermented palm oil sludge in broiler’s diet Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, Tatty; Pasaribu, T; Darma, J; Bintang, I.A.K; Togatorop, M.H
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 2 (2001): JUNE 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (134.124 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i2.226

Abstract

Drying proces, especially with heating often affects the nutritive values of feed ingredients. Therefore, this experiment was designed to study the responses of broiler chickens when fed with ration containing fresh or dried fermented palm oil sludge(FPOS). Experimental diets with different levels of fresh or dried FPOS (5, 10, and 15% equally to dried FPOS) were formulated with similar nutrient contents. A control diet with no FPOS was also included. Each diet was fed to 30 broiler chickens (5 replicates of 6 birds) for 5 weeks. Performances (body weight, feed consumption, feed conversion, and mortalities) of chickens were recorded. Carcass percentage and abdominal fat content was also measured at the end of feeding trial. Data obtained were subjected to analysis of variance in a completely randomized design and different between means were tested by orthogonal contrast procedures. Results of the experiment showed that body weight gain (BWG) of control birds was not significantlydifferent with BWG of birds fed with FPOS. Birds fed with dried FLS gain more weight  than those fed with fresh FPOS (1048 vs 981 g/bird). Increasing of dietary FPOS levels decreased BWG, but 10% inclusion was still tolerable. Feed consumption of control diet was significantly (P<0.05) less than feed consumption of diet with FPOS. Increasing of dried FPOS to 15% did not affect feed consumption, but increasing of fresh FPOS significantly increased feed consumption. Feed conversion (FCR) of control diet was significantly better than the FPOS diet (2.07 vs 2.13). Increasing levels of dried FPOS from 5 to 10% did not affect the FCR, but further increasing to 15% significantly worsen the FCR. Increasing of fresh FPOS from 5 to 10 or 15 significantly worsen the FCR. Dry matter intake, mortalities, carcass percentage, liver weight, and abdominal fat levels of broilers were not significantly affected by dietary treatments (P>0.05). Conversion of feed dry matter to body weight gain of control diet was not significantly (P>0.05) different with those diets with FPOS. However, dry matter conversion of dried FPOS was significantly better than the fresh FPOS. Increasing levels of FLS from 5 to 15 significantly worsen the feed dry matter conversion but not with inclusion of 10% FPOS. Therefore, it is concluded that there is no superior advantage of feeding fresh FPOS as compared with dried FPOS. Inclusion of 10% dried or fresh FPOS in the diets did not affect growth performances of broiler chickens.   Key words: Palm oil sludge, dried, fermented, broilers
Aflatoxin M1 in fresh dairy milk from small individual farms in Indonesia Widiastuti, R.; Anastasia, Y.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 23, No 3 (2018): SEPTEMBER 2018
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (149.066 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v23i3.1789

Abstract

This present study was aimed to investigate the presence of aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) residue in fresh dairy milk collected from small dairyl farms. A total of 104 samples of fresh cow's milk were collected in Pengalengan-Bandung and Sukabumi (West Java province), and Tanggamus (Lampung province) in April and September 2012. All samples were analyzed by a high performance liquid chromatography and detected with fluorescence detector after extraction with organic solvents. Contamination of AFM1 was found on 1.96% (1/51) from the samples collected in April 2012 at concentration of 1.20 ng/L and 39.63% (21/53) from the samples collected in September 2012 at concentration of 1.20 ng/L 1.0 – 34.1 ng/L. Those positive samples were obtained from Pangalengan and Sukabumi, but none for those samples collected from Tanggamus both on collection time April nor September 2012. In those positive samples for AFM1, there is no sample contained AFM1 above the maximum level (ML) regulated in Indonesia (500 ng/L or 0.5 µg/L). Low contamination levels of AFB1 in the range of 0.38 to 6.64 µg/kg found in supplemental feed samples from the same sampling time and locations. The findings of AFM1 contamination in raw fresh milk from this study caused no harm to the consumers. However, regular monitoring on the presence of AFM1 in dairy milk and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) in dairy cattle feed is necessary to ensure the protection of human health.
The effect of aflatoxins B1 (AFB1) on chick embryo Bahri, Sjamsul; Widiastuti, R; Mustikaningsih, Y
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 10, No 2 (2005): JUNE 2005
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (298.84 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v10i2.469

Abstract

Aflatoxins are toxic compounds which occurred in cereals especially low qualities corn and peanuts. Aflatoxins are mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic. The presence of aflatoxin in food including derived food in Indonesia had been observed, however, the observation on its toxicity effect is still limited. This research was conducted to study the effect of innoculation of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) on the development of embryonic chicken egg, mortality and hatchability. The AFB1 was innoculated 10 μl in each 5 days age embryonic egg through air sacs dosaged 0; 15,6; 31,2; 62,5; 125 and 250 ng. The results showed that hatchability of those embryos were 66, 28, 26, 16, 0 and 0% respectively for 0; 15,6; 31,2; 62,5; 125 and 250 ng innoculation of AFB1. Innoculation of AFB1 caused malformation of the embryos, malabsorbtion of the yolk egg. The weight of hatched eggs was not significantly different in each group, eventhough there was a tendency that high AFB1 innoculation will decreased the live weight.     Key Words: Aflatoxin B1, Toxicity, Chick Embryo
Coat colour pattern in Garut sheep and its crossbred Inounu, Ismeth; Ambarawati, D.; Mulyono, R.H.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 2 (2009): JUNE 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (211.937 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i2.353

Abstract

Coat colour is a qualitative trait whose expression is controlled by genes and could be used as a characteristic of sheep breed and could be used as a trade mark for certain sheep breeder enterprise. The research was done to study the coat color pattern in Garut sheep and its crossbred. In this study 178 heads of sheep was used which consisted of 64 Garut sheep (GG); 24 MG sheep (50% M and 50% G); 14 HG sheep (50% St. Croix and 50% G); 20 HMG sheep and 56 MHG sheep. HMG and MHG sheep are compost of 25% St Croix; 25% M. Charolais and 50% Garut. Phenotypic observation of coat colour were done by visualization and from the picture of sheep as individual identity in each position from the right; the left, front and rear sites. Sheep coat colour pattern in this study was largely determined by 5 main alleles: white or tan (65.7%), wild (17.4%), badgerface (14.6%), Light badgerface (0.6%) and black and tan (1.7%) that present at the Agouti locus. Other locus that determine the coat colour pattern in this study are Albino (C); Australian Piebald (AsP); Brown (B); Extension (E); Pigment Head (Ph); Roan (Rn); Spotting (S); Sur Bukhara and Sur Surkhandarya (SuB/SuS) and Ticking (Ti) all of these locus increase the variation of coat colour pattern. Key words: Coat Colour Pattern
The efficacy of Tiamulin hydrogen fumarat 10% in the feed to prevent chronic respiratory disease in broiler chickens ., Soeripto
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 13, No 1 (2008): MARCH 2008
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (128.32 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i1.597

Abstract

Up to presence chronic respiratory disease (CRD) of chickens is still causing economic losses against poultry industries in the world. The purpose of this trial is to determine the efficacy and safety of a compatible dose of Tiamulin hydrogen fumarat 10% in combination with monensin for the control of CRD in broilers. A number of 630 day-old broilers were divided into 3 groups and each group was divided again into 7 subgroups of 30 equally sexed birds. Each subgroup was placed randomly in 2 chicken houses. Up to 3 weeks of age, chickens in Group I were fed with starter feed (SP1) containing 100 ppm monensin only without other treatment and used as control. Chickens in Group II were fed with SP1 feed containing 30 ppm Tiamulin hydrogen fumarat (3 – 6 mg/ kg BW) and 110 ppm amoxicillin, this feed is called SP1+, whereas chickens in Group III were administered with SP1 feed and treated with enrofloxacin liquid formulation 10% with a dose 0.5ml/L in drinking water for the first 5 days of life. Started from 22nd day until the end of the experiment at 32 days of age, all chickens in Groups I, II and III were fed with SP2 finisher feed containing neither monensin nor Tiamulin hydrogen fumarat. The results of the experiment showed that no statistical difference in bodyweight and feed conversions among the groups at 32 days of age but feed conversion in Group II was statistically different compared to those in Groups I and III at week 2. No clinical signs of toxic interaction of monensin combined with Tiamulin were observed. Lesions of airsacculitis and ascites occurred only in dead chickens of Groups I and III but not in chickens of Group II. The incidence of pneumonia in Group I occurred in all dead birds which is statistically different to Group II that had one lesion of pneumonia. Mycoplasma gallisepticum and Escherichia coli organisms were able to be isolated from the chickens that had pneumonia and ascites in Groups I and III only. The results of the experiment showed that combination of 30ppm Tiamulin hydrogen fumarat + 110 ppm amoxicillin is effective for preventing CRD in broilers and save if it is combined with 100 ppm monensin. Key Words: Tiamulin Hydrogen Fumarat, Chronic Respiratory Disease, Broilers
Studies on the survival and development of field-caught snail Lymnaea rubiginosa in the laboratory Widjajanti, S
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 3, No 3 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (138.402 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i3.118

Abstract

Lymnaea rubiginosa was collected from two habitats in order to observe their survival and growth rate including their egg production, hatching time and the time they needed to reach maturity. One of the habitat is rice fields in Bogor (subdistricts of Ciomas and Ciampea) and the other is a pond in Bogor Botanical Garden. In the laboratory those snails were kept in separate aquarium and grouped according to their shell length. The result showed that the longer the snail length the shorter their survival rate and less egg production. Moreover, the snails collected from rice fields were infected with Echinostoma sp. And Chaetogaster sp., while the snails from the pond were only infected with Chaetogaster sp. The hatching time is between 10-14 days, and to reach maturity, with shell length about 1 cm, they need about 6 weeks.   Key words : Lymnaea rubiginosa, survival, growth rate, fasciolosis
Alleviation of oxidative stress, carcass fat and plasma cholesterol in broiler chickens consuming antanan (Centella asiatica) and vitamin C Kusnadi, Engkus
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 13, No 1 (2008): MARCH 2008
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (124.483 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i1.588

Abstract

Oxidative stress (a condition where oxidant -free radical- activity dominates the antioxidant activity) in poultry may be caused by heat stress from high environmental temperature. In this research, antanan (Centella asiatica) and vitamin C was utilized as anti heat-stress agents for broilers. One hundred and twenty male broilers of 2 – 6 weeks of age were kept at 31.98 ± 1.940C poultry house temperature during the day and 27.36 ± 1.310C at night. The treatments consist of two kinds: two levels of vitamin C (0 and 500ppm) and three levels of antanan (0, 5 and 10% of diets). The data colected was analized for variance with a factorial in completely randomized design of 2 x 3 (2 levels of vitamin C, 3 levels of antanan) and continued with contrast-orthogonal test when applicable. The results indicated that the treatments of antanan 5% without vitamin C (A5C0), antanan 10% without vitamin C (A10C0), vitamin C 500ppm without antanan (A0C500), combination of A5 and C500 (A5C500), and combination of  A10 and C500 (A10C500) significantly (P<0.05) decreased the level of liver malonaldehida (MDA), carcass lipid and plasma cholesterol. Key Words: Oxidative Stress, Centella Asiatica, Vitamin C
Polymorphism of Pituitary-Specific Transcription Factor-1 (Pit-1) Gene at Locus (Pit-1-Hinf1) and its effects on dam body weight and milk production of local sheeps Sumantri, C.; Herdiana, D.; Farajallah, A.; Rahmat, D.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 14, No 3 (2009): SEPTEMBER 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (302.36 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v14i3.344

Abstract

Pituitary-Specific Transcription Factor-1 (Pit-1) is a transcription factor with critical role in the transcriptional regulation of multiple genes in the pituitary. The objective of this research was to identify polymorphism of Pituitary-Specific Transcription Factor-1 (Pit-1) gene at Locus (Pit-1-Hinf1) and to investigate any possible associations of Pit-1 genotypes on dam body weight, milk production and milk quality in local sheep at the Jonggol Animal Science Teaching and Research Unit (JASTRU), Fact. Anim. Sci. Bogor. Agric. Univ. A total number of 161 blood samples were collected from 3 local sheep, namely Garut from Wanaraja (55 hd), Garut from Margawati (23 hd) and lactating ewes (83 hd) from JASTRU  farm in Bogor. Genomic DNAs were extracted by a standard phenol-chloroform protocol and amplified by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques, then PCR products were digested with a Hinf1 enzyme restriction. Fragments of Pit-1gene at locus Pit-1-Hinf1 was detected by a silver-staining method. A length of 637 base pairs (bps) of the Pit-1 gene of local sheep was successfully amplified. The Hinf1 restriction enzyme cut the PCR product into three different length of fragments succesively at 345, 137, and 115   bps designated as A allele; whilst B allele had four fragments at 283, 137, 115, and 62 bps respectively. The locus of Pit-1-Hinf1 was polymorphic in local sheep from Jonggol, however it was monomorfic in Garut sheep. The frequencies of A and B alleles were 0,806 and 0,194 respectively. Pit-1 genotypes had no significant effect on dam body weight and milk production. This result is indicating that the use of single locus Pit-1-Hinf1 in Pit-1 gen is less effective to be used as a candidate in selecting dam body weight and milk production in these three local sheep. Key words: Local Sheep, Pit-1 Gene, Polymorphism, Dam, Milk
The use of ant-plant (Myrmecodia pendans) as feed additive to broilers chicken Yuanita, Iis; Silitonga, L; ., Paulini
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 19, No 2 (2014): JUNE 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (190.969 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v19i2.1042

Abstract

Ant-plant (Myrmecodia pendans) is a unique plant which is widely used in Central Kalimantan and contains antioxidant flavonoids and tannin. The use of herbs as organic materials may produce good performance and carcass of chicken. The experiment used 40 Ross strain day old chicks which were randomly divided into 5 treatments and 4 replicates. The treatments were T0 (basal diet as a control), T1 (basal diet+0.1% ant-plant), T2 (basal diet+0.2% ant-plant), T3 (basal diet+0.3% ant-plant) and T4 (basal diet+0.4% ant-plant). Data were collected during 35 days to obtain feed intake, body weight gain, feed conversion, final body weight, mortality, carcass percentage and performance index. The data were analyzed for variances based on a Completely Randomized Design and continued with Duncan’s Multiple Range Test for differences. The result showed no significant effect of treatments on the performances, but T1 treatment (containing 0.1% ant-plant) showed good tendency to gain body weight, final body weight, carcass percentage and performance index respectively 0.51%; 0.44%; 0.15%; and 3.09% higher than T0 (control). It also showed good feed efficiency with feed conversion of value 2.43% lower than control. In conlusion, ant-plant as feed additive until 0.4% in broiler diet had no effect to improve broiler performances.Key Words: Broiler, Ant-Plant (Myrmecodia pendans), Feed Additive, Performance

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