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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience
ISSN : 23559314     EISSN : 23559306     DOI : -
Core Subject : Science,
The spirit to improve the journal to be more credible is increasing, and in 2012 it invited earth scientists in East and Southeast Asia as well as some western countries to join the journal for the editor positions in the Indonesia Journal of Geology. This is also to realize our present goal to internationalize the journal, The Indonesian Journal on Geoscience, which is open for papers of geology, geophysics, geochemistry, geodetics, geography, and soil science. This new born journal is expected to be published three times a year. As an international publication, of course it must all be written in an international language, in this case English. This adds difficulties to the effort to obtain good papers in English to publish although the credit points that an author will get are much higher.
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Articles 10 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 8, No 1 (2013)" : 10 Documents clear
The August 2010 Phreatic Eruption of Mount Sinabung, North Sumatra Sutawidjaja, Igan S.; Prambada, O.; Siregar, D. A.
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 8, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1301.443 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.8.1.55-61

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i1.155Mount Sinabung, located in Karo Regency, North Sumatra Province, is a strato volcano having four active craters. Since its latest eruption about 1,200 year ago, a phreatic eruption occurred on August 27th, 2010. The eruption took place in Crater-I, which was initiated by a greyish white plume and then followed by black plumes as high as 2000 m above the crater. Altered rock fragments and ash were erupted during this event. The altered rocks show a development of argillic alterations which was formed in the hydrothermal system in depth. The alteration zone is formed along the northeast-southwest and northwest-southeast trend across the three craters. All of the craters are actively discharging solfataric gases, of which sulphur deposits are resulted, and they have been quarried by the local people. The age of the latest magmatic eruption was dated by 14C method from the charcoal sample found in the pyroclastic flow deposits near Bekerah Village.
The Potential of Ketungau and Silat Shales in Ketungau and Melawi Basins, West Kalimantan: For Oil Shale and Shale Gas Exploration Santy, Lauti Dwita; Panggabean, Hermes
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 8, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1087.509 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.8.1.39-53

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i1.154The Ketungau and Melawi Basins, in West Kalimantan, are Tertiary intramontane basins of which the potential for economic conventional oil and gas discoveries have not previously been confirmed. The Ketungau Basin is bordered by the Melawi Basin in the south. Besides non-ideal trapping mechanisms, another major problem in these basins is source rock maturation. Nevertheless, both basins are promising to be explored for oil shale and shale gas energy resources. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to give some perspectives on their source rocks, as an input for the evaluation of the potential of unconventional oil and gas. About twenty samples collected from the Ketungau and Melawi Basins were analyzed using pyrolysis and organic petrographic methods. The results show a poor to good quality of source rock potential. The Ketungau shale, which is the main source rock in the Ketungau Basin, is dominated by type III, immature, and gas prone kerogen. The Silat shale, which is the main source rock in the Melawi Basin, is dominated by type II, immature to early mature, mixed gas, and oil prone kerogen. In the field, Ketungau and Silat Formations have a widespread distribution, and are typically 900 m to 1000 m thick. Both the Ketungau and Silat shales occur within synclinal structures, which have a poor trapping mechanism for conventional oil or gas targets, but are suitable for oil shale and shale gas exploration. This early stage of research clearly shows good potential for the future development of unconventional energy within the Ketungau and Melawi Basins.
Depositional Environment of Fine-Grained Sedimentary Rocks of the Sinamar Formation, Muara Bungo, Jambi Zajuli, M. Heri Hermiyanto; Panggabean, H.
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 8, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (2032.861 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.8.1.25-38

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i1.153The research area is situated in the northwestern side of South Sumatra Basin, which is a part of Muara Bungo Regency, Jambi Province. The Oligocene Sinamar Formation consists of shale, claystone, mudstone, sandstone, conglomeratic sandstone, and coal-seam intercalations. This research was focused on fine sedimentary rock of Sinamar Formation, such as shale, claystone, and mudstone. Primary data were collected from SNM boreholes which have depths varying from 75 m up to 200 m, and outcrops that were analyzed by organic petrographic method, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of normal alkanes including isoprenoids, and sterane. The dominant maceral group is exinite, composed of alginite (3.4 - 18%), and resinite (1.6 - 5.6%), while vitrinite maceral consists of tellocolinite 0.4 - 0.6%, desmocollinite 0.4%, and vitrodetrinite 8.4 - 16.6%. Organic petrography and biomarker analyses show that organic materials of shales were derived from high plants and algae especially Botrycoccus species. Botrycoccus and fresh water fish fossil, found in the shale indicate a lacustrine environment.
The Potential of Eocene Shale of Nanggulan Formation as a Hydrocarbon Source Rock Winardi, S.; Toha, B.; Imron, M.; Amijaya, D. H.
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 8, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (2489.099 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.8.1.13-23

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i1.152In western Indonesia, Eocene shale is generally considered as a potential source rock. The Nanggulan Formation outcropping at Kulonprogo Yogyakarta consists of a shale interval of Eocene in age. Analysis of its organic material content, kerogen type, and maturity level were conducted to know its potential. The laboratory analysis of eleven samples were done to measure its TOC content. Samples with TOC > 0.5% then were analyzed to measure its Rv and TAI. Maturity level was also calculated by TTI from burial history model. The result of analysis shows there are various TOC contents and seven samples of them are categorized into a good-excellent class (TOC > 1%). Kerogen content of those samples is type III (non fluorescene amorphous-humic kerogen). One sample has a good indication of hydrocarbon formation (PY = 9.0 mg HC/g rock). Unfortunately thermal maturity level of the samples is immature (highest Rv 0.39, Tmax 422oC, and TAI 2). Otherwise, TTI calculation result from subsurface burial history modelling indicates that some areas are mature having reached gas window since 0.4 mya, especially in the area which had been influenced by a volcanic intrusion at Oligocene (28.5 mya). Therefore, the Nanggulan Formation shale has a potential capacity as a source rock with some limitation in maturity level.
Shell Bed Identification of Kaliwangu Formation and its Sedimentary Cycle Significance, Sumedang, West Java Aswan, Aswan; Rijani, S; Riza, Y.
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 8, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1907.589 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.8.1.1-11

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i1.151Kaliwangu Formation cropping out around Sumedang area contains mollusk fossils dominated by gastropods and bivalves. In terms of sequence stratigraphy, each sedimentary cycle generally consists of four shell bed types: Early Transgressive Systems Tract (Early TST) deposited above an erosional surface or sequence boundary, that is characterized by shell disarticulation, trace fossils, gravelly content, no fossil orientation direction, and concretion at the bottom; Late Transgressive Systems Tract (Late TST) identified by articulated (conjoined) specimen in its life position, that shows a low level abration and fragmentation, adult specimen with complete shells, and variation of taxa; Early Highstand Systems Tract (Early HST) characterized by adult taxa that was found locally in their life position with individual articulation, juvenile specimens frequently occured; Late Highstand Systems Tract (Late HST) determined as multiple-event concentrations, disarticulated shell domination, and some carbon or amber intercalation indicating terrestrial influence. Shell bed identification done on this rock unit identified nineteen sedimentary cycles.
Shell Bed Identification of Kaliwangu Formation and its Sedimentary Cycle Significance, Sumedang, West Java Aswan, Aswan; Rijani, S; Riza, Y.
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 8, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1907.589 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.8.1.1-11

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i1.151Kaliwangu Formation cropping out around Sumedang area contains mollusk fossils dominated by gastropods and bivalves. In terms of sequence stratigraphy, each sedimentary cycle generally consists of four shell bed types: Early Transgressive Systems Tract (Early TST) deposited above an erosional surface or sequence boundary, that is characterized by shell disarticulation, trace fossils, gravelly content, no fossil orientation direction, and concretion at the bottom; Late Transgressive Systems Tract (Late TST) identified by articulated (conjoined) specimen in its life position, that shows a low level abration and fragmentation, adult specimen with complete shells, and variation of taxa; Early Highstand Systems Tract (Early HST) characterized by adult taxa that was found locally in their life position with individual articulation, juvenile specimens frequently occured; Late Highstand Systems Tract (Late HST) determined as multiple-event concentrations, disarticulated shell domination, and some carbon or amber intercalation indicating terrestrial influence. Shell bed identification done on this rock unit identified nineteen sedimentary cycles.
The Potential of Eocene Shale of Nanggulan Formation as a Hydrocarbon Source Rock Winardi, S.; Toha, B.; Imron, M.; Amijaya, D. H.
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 8, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (2489.099 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.8.1.13-23

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i1.152In western Indonesia, Eocene shale is generally considered as a potential source rock. The Nanggulan Formation outcropping at Kulonprogo Yogyakarta consists of a shale interval of Eocene in age. Analysis of its organic material content, kerogen type, and maturity level were conducted to know its potential. The laboratory analysis of eleven samples were done to measure its TOC content. Samples with TOC > 0.5% then were analyzed to measure its Rv and TAI. Maturity level was also calculated by TTI from burial history model. The result of analysis shows there are various TOC contents and seven samples of them are categorized into a good-excellent class (TOC > 1%). Kerogen content of those samples is type III (non fluorescene amorphous-humic kerogen). One sample has a good indication of hydrocarbon formation (PY = 9.0 mg HC/g rock). Unfortunately thermal maturity level of the samples is immature (highest Rv 0.39, Tmax 422oC, and TAI 2). Otherwise, TTI calculation result from subsurface burial history modelling indicates that some areas are mature having reached gas window since 0.4 mya, especially in the area which had been influenced by a volcanic intrusion at Oligocene (28.5 mya). Therefore, the Nanggulan Formation shale has a potential capacity as a source rock with some limitation in maturity level.
Depositional Environment of Fine-Grained Sedimentary Rocks of the Sinamar Formation, Muara Bungo, Jambi Zajuli, M. Heri Hermiyanto; Panggabean, H.
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 8, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (2032.861 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.8.1.25-38

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i1.153The research area is situated in the northwestern side of South Sumatra Basin, which is a part of Muara Bungo Regency, Jambi Province. The Oligocene Sinamar Formation consists of shale, claystone, mudstone, sandstone, conglomeratic sandstone, and coal-seam intercalations. This research was focused on fine sedimentary rock of Sinamar Formation, such as shale, claystone, and mudstone. Primary data were collected from SNM boreholes which have depths varying from 75 m up to 200 m, and outcrops that were analyzed by organic petrographic method, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of normal alkanes including isoprenoids, and sterane. The dominant maceral group is exinite, composed of alginite (3.4 - 18%), and resinite (1.6 - 5.6%), while vitrinite maceral consists of tellocolinite 0.4 - 0.6%, desmocollinite 0.4%, and vitrodetrinite 8.4 - 16.6%. Organic petrography and biomarker analyses show that organic materials of shales were derived from high plants and algae especially Botrycoccus species. Botrycoccus and fresh water fish fossil, found in the shale indicate a lacustrine environment.
The Potential of Ketungau and Silat Shales in Ketungau and Melawi Basins, West Kalimantan: For Oil Shale and Shale Gas Exploration Santy, Lauti Dwita; Panggabean, Hermes
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 8, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1087.509 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.8.1.39-53

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i1.154The Ketungau and Melawi Basins, in West Kalimantan, are Tertiary intramontane basins of which the potential for economic conventional oil and gas discoveries have not previously been confirmed. The Ketungau Basin is bordered by the Melawi Basin in the south. Besides non-ideal trapping mechanisms, another major problem in these basins is source rock maturation. Nevertheless, both basins are promising to be explored for oil shale and shale gas energy resources. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to give some perspectives on their source rocks, as an input for the evaluation of the potential of unconventional oil and gas. About twenty samples collected from the Ketungau and Melawi Basins were analyzed using pyrolysis and organic petrographic methods. The results show a poor to good quality of source rock potential. The Ketungau shale, which is the main source rock in the Ketungau Basin, is dominated by type III, immature, and gas prone kerogen. The Silat shale, which is the main source rock in the Melawi Basin, is dominated by type II, immature to early mature, mixed gas, and oil prone kerogen. In the field, Ketungau and Silat Formations have a widespread distribution, and are typically 900 m to 1000 m thick. Both the Ketungau and Silat shales occur within synclinal structures, which have a poor trapping mechanism for conventional oil or gas targets, but are suitable for oil shale and shale gas exploration. This early stage of research clearly shows good potential for the future development of unconventional energy within the Ketungau and Melawi Basins.
The August 2010 Phreatic Eruption of Mount Sinabung, North Sumatra Sutawidjaja, Igan S.; Prambada, O.; Siregar, D. A.
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 8, No 1 (2013)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1301.443 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.8.1.55-61

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v8i1.155Mount Sinabung, located in Karo Regency, North Sumatra Province, is a strato volcano having four active craters. Since its latest eruption about 1,200 year ago, a phreatic eruption occurred on August 27th, 2010. The eruption took place in Crater-I, which was initiated by a greyish white plume and then followed by black plumes as high as 2000 m above the crater. Altered rock fragments and ash were erupted during this event. The altered rocks show a development of argillic alterations which was formed in the hydrothermal system in depth. The alteration zone is formed along the northeast-southwest and northwest-southeast trend across the three craters. All of the craters are actively discharging solfataric gases, of which sulphur deposits are resulted, and they have been quarried by the local people. The age of the latest magmatic eruption was dated by 14C method from the charcoal sample found in the pyroclastic flow deposits near Bekerah Village.

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