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Ivan Ferdian
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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience
ISSN : 23559314     EISSN : 23559306     DOI : -
Core Subject : Science,
The spirit to improve the journal to be more credible is increasing, and in 2012 it invited earth scientists in East and Southeast Asia as well as some western countries to join the journal for the editor positions in the Indonesia Journal of Geology. This is also to realize our present goal to internationalize the journal, The Indonesian Journal on Geoscience, which is open for papers of geology, geophysics, geochemistry, geodetics, geography, and soil science. This new born journal is expected to be published three times a year. As an international publication, of course it must all be written in an international language, in this case English. This adds difficulties to the effort to obtain good papers in English to publish although the credit points that an author will get are much higher.
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Articles 14 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 5, No 3 (2018)" : 14 Documents clear
Element Mobilization During Weathering Process of Ultramafic Complex in North Konawe Regency, Southeast Sulawesi Based on A Profile from Asera Irzon, Ronaldo; Abdullah, Baharuddin
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 5, No 3 (2018)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (3309.291 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.277-290

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.277-290The North Konawe Regency, located in the northern part of the southeast arm of Sulawesi Province, is occupied mainly by Ophiolite Complex. Recent studies on weathering of ultramafic complex have been focussed on the composition of laterite in relation to heavy metal explorations. In Asera area, North Konawe, a 3.1 m wide outcrop of ultramafic rocks is related to nickel laterite potential. In this study, an elemental change during the weathering process is discussed, including the mobilization of rare earth elements. XRF and ICP-MS from The Centre for Geological Survey of Indonesia are the two important geochemistry instruments used in this study. Si, Mg, and Ca are depleted during weathering, whilst the enriched elements are Fe, Al, Ti, and some heavy metals such as Cr, Mn, and Co. A different mobilization pattern is detected on Ni, because of its relation to Mg. Cs, Rb, and Ba are concentrated in a clayey horizon of upper laterite. The increase of REE concentrations is parallel to both Fe and Mn which rises to the top of laterite. Ce and Eu negative anomaly trends indicate oxidizing condition through the weathering process, although the studied profile, influenced by allochthon material, morphology condition, and geochemistry composition, indicates that the transported rock fragments were originated from ultramafic rock.
Groundwater Occurrence Prediction using Regressions on Morphometric Variables in Upstream Progo Watershed, Yogyakarta Listyani, T.; Budiadi, Budiadi
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 5, No 3 (2018)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (3300.005 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.265-276

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.265-276Geomorphological mapping has been done at the upstream part of Progo Drainage Area by measuring some geomorphological indexes and level of shallow groundwater level at 196 stations, to investigate connections between geomorphological characteristics and groundwater system in the area. These indexes are valley floor - height ratio (Vf), valley cross section (Vratio o rVr), stream gradient index (SL), and drainage density (Dd). Based on the linear regression analysis, the four indexes show none to very weak correlation to water table at most locations. It means that all width, height, and width of the river valley do not control shallow groundwater level. However, some locations indicate a strong control of elevation to shallow groundwater level. The first case indicates that there is another controlling factor to the shallow groundwater system. Most likely, a deeper aquifer exists at those locations, which does not show up in the second case. All results give a preliminary indication that morphometry can be used to predict groundwater system in the area.
Determination of Hydrocarbon Zones Using Logging Data Analysis in A Sandstone Reservoir (Case Study: Structure ‘TL’ Basin North West Java) Herianto, Herianto
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 5, No 3 (2018)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1261.221 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.251-263

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.251-263Northwest Java Basin is one of the Indonesian basins that has the potential of hydrocarbon reservoir. A petrophysical analysis plays a role in determining the physical properties of reservoir rocks such as shale volume, porosity, and water saturation zones which is to analyze the hydrocarbon zone possibilities (net pay). A qualitative analysis and correlation of rock lithology study were carried out at seven wells, while a quantitative study was performed by calculating the volume of the shale with a linear method, density-neutron porosity, and water saturation using simandoux equation, then zoning the prospect zones was finally done. Based on the calculation and data analysis, Vsh cutoff value obtained is 23%, the porosity is 10.6%, and water saturation is 71%. Then, the zones of hydrocarbon prospects were recovered, that are the PI-08 wells (9.632 ft - 9.662 ft), PI-10 (9.420 ft - 9.468 ft, 9.475 ft - 9.516 ft, 10.155 ft - 10.175 ft), well PI-11 (9.268 ft - 9.288 ft), well PI-11ST (9.268 ft - 9.927 ft), well PI-12 (9.396 ft - 9.461 ft, 10.047 ft - 10.059 ft), and PI-13 wells (9.356 ft - 9.416 ft, 9.980 ft - 10.000 ft).
The Magnetostratigraphy and the Age of So’a Basin Fossil-Bearing Sequence, Flores, Indonesia Yurnaldi, Dida; Setiawan, Ruly; Patriani, Emma Yan
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 5, No 3 (2018)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1741.172 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.221-234

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.221-234Three fossil-bearing intervals have been recognized in the Pleistocene So’a Basin, with the upper one holding important evidence of hominin fossils. The sequence also contains numerous in situ stone artifacts and fossils of other vertebrate taxa. Therefore, multiple dating techniques are crucial to secure the age of the fossil and artifact-bearing layers, especially the one with the hominin remains. This paper deals with the palaeomagnetic dating of the So’a Basin sequence to assist other dating methods that have been applied, and to refine the chronostratigraphy of the area. Palaeomagnetic sampling was conducted in four sections along a west to east transect. Four magnetozones can be recognized, consisting of two reverse and two normal polarity zones. By using the available radiometric ages as a guide and comparing the So’a Basin magnetostratigraphy with the Standard Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS), it became clear that both reverse magnetozones are part of the Matuyama Chron, while the normal magnetozones are the Jaramillo subchron and the Brunhes Chron. These palaeomagnetic dating results support the available radiometric dates and refine the age of the fossil-bearing deposits of the So’a Basin.
Tectonic Control on the Formation of Cleats in the Coal Beds of the Sajau Formation, Berau Basin, Northeast Kalimantan Sudradjat, Adjat; Hamdani, Ahmad Helman
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 5, No 3 (2018)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (4497.853 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.235-250

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.235-250Coal seams of lignite- to subbituminous rank of Pliocene-age from the Sajau Formation of the Berau Basin are characterized by the presence of a natural fracture system, including cleats. Often, these opening-mode fractures consist of two orthogonal sets (face and butt cleats), both almost perpendicular to the bedding. This paper describes the distribution of orientation, spacing, and aperture of cleats formed in the seams of the Sajau Formation. All observations and measurements were conducted at macroscopic, mesoscopic, and microscopic scales. The butt cleat mean orientations are NE-SW and NW-SE, whereas the face cleat mean orientations are NNE-SSW and NE-SE, and the cleat dip is at a high angle of 75° to the north. The angles between the orientations of these cleat sets are nearly 90°; that is, they are orthogonal. The spacing of the macroface cleats is between 9.52 and 14.46 cm (averaging 11.61 cm), while the spacing of the butt cleats is between 2.3 and 11.3 cm (averaging 5.35 cm). The mean aperture is 0.54 mm. In contrast, the mean spacing of the mesoface cleats is 3.09 mm, and the aperture measurements of these cleats range from 0.0478 to 0.0741 mm (averaging 0.0549 mm). The results obtained from outcrops and X-ray CT (computed tomography) scan clearly indicate that the NNE-SSW face cleat orientations are strictly parallel to the elongation of the main tectonic structures in the studied area. Their origin may be explained by their relationship with local tectonic stress (the maximum principal stress, σ1, was horizontal). Partial least square analysis of data collected from cleats and faults in the area indicates that a power law distribution exists between the cleat characteristics (spacing, density, and aperture), and the distance of the faults (R2 = 0.56). Cleat formation in the Sajau Formation was mainly controlled by the mechanical response to tectonic stresses, which generated a unique cleat network in the coal. Based on the SEM photography, it is concluded that the development of microcleats in the Sajau Formation resulted from both endogenic processes and tectonic activities as indicated by the change in the shape of the cleats, from straight line to curved shape and branching (intersection of multiple cleats that form a conical network at the end).
Biomarker Composition of Some Oil Seeps from West Sulawesi, Indonesia Sutadiwiria, Yarra; Hamdani, Ahmad Helman; Sendjaja, Yoga Andriana; Haryanto, Iyan; Yeftamikha, Yeftamikha
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 5, No 3 (2018)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (764.218 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.211-220

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.211-220A suite of oil seep samples collected from the Lariang and Karama Basins, West Sulawesi, Indonesia, have been analyzed using GC and GCMS techniques. Their biomarker compositions have been used to reveal the likely source rock that produces oil. These oil seep samples contain a range in both the concentration of hydrocarbons present and certain level of biodegradation experienced. All sterane m/z 217 data display a familiar pattern of steranes with carbon numbers from 27 to 29 together with pregnane and homo-pregnanes, including rearranged steranes. Triterpane (m/z 191) data show a moderate content of tricyclic terpanes (Tri/C30H), medium to high ratio of norhopane/hopane (C29/C30), and medium to high abundant land plan marker such as resin bicadinanes(Bic/C30H) and oleananes (Ol/C30H). The presence of high abundant oleananes in these samples has been interpreted as the evidence for a marine influence during early diagenesis that may occur by marine or via re-deposition of peat organics in marine sediments. Hence, these results state that the organic matter facies for their source rock oil seep samples from the West Sulawesi region are detected as mixed between allochthonous macerals from typical terrestrial higher plants transported into the basin from distal swamps and soils and some marine organic matter.
The Selection of Groundwater Recharge Sites in the Arid Region of Northern Badia, Jordan, using GIS-Based Multicriteria Decision Analysis Al-Shabeeb, Abdel Rahman
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 5, No 3 (2018)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (798.489 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.199-209

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.199-209This study aims to locate new groundwater recharge sites in the arid region of northern Badia, Jordan, based on specific criteria including lithology, drainage and lineament density, soil texture, slope, and rainfall. With groundwater serving as the key source of Jordanian drinking water, the use of surface water for groundwater recharge is essential in maximizing the groundwater available. Groundwater recharge sites were selected using the weighted linear combination (WLC) method with the aforementioned criteria. According to the findings, 5.064% of the region is very highly suited to groundwater recharge, 33.599% of the region is highly suited, and 3.789% of the region is moderately suited. However, 26.634% of the region is poorly suited to groundwater recharge, with a further 30.943% being very poorly suited. The significance of each criterion for groundwater recharge was identified using removal analysis, with the most significant factor being efficient groundwater management. Given this finding, big data are required in order to determine the optimal locations for groundwater recharge as part of future groundwater planning and management.
The Selection of Groundwater Recharge Sites in the Arid Region of Northern Badia, Jordan, using GIS-Based Multicriteria Decision Analysis Al-Shabeeb, Abdel Rahman
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 5, No 3 (2018)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (798.489 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.199-209

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.199-209This study aims to locate new groundwater recharge sites in the arid region of northern Badia, Jordan, based on specific criteria including lithology, drainage and lineament density, soil texture, slope, and rainfall. With groundwater serving as the key source of Jordanian drinking water, the use of surface water for groundwater recharge is essential in maximizing the groundwater available. Groundwater recharge sites were selected using the weighted linear combination (WLC) method with the aforementioned criteria. According to the findings, 5.064% of the region is very highly suited to groundwater recharge, 33.599% of the region is highly suited, and 3.789% of the region is moderately suited. However, 26.634% of the region is poorly suited to groundwater recharge, with a further 30.943% being very poorly suited. The significance of each criterion for groundwater recharge was identified using removal analysis, with the most significant factor being efficient groundwater management. Given this finding, big data are required in order to determine the optimal locations for groundwater recharge as part of future groundwater planning and management.
Biomarker Composition of Some Oil Seeps from West Sulawesi, Indonesia Sutadiwiria, Yarra; Hamdani, Ahmad Helman; Sendjaja, Yoga Andriana; Haryanto, Iyan; Yeftamikha, Yeftamikha
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 5, No 3 (2018)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (764.218 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.211-220

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.211-220A suite of oil seep samples collected from the Lariang and Karama Basins, West Sulawesi, Indonesia, have been analyzed using GC and GCMS techniques. Their biomarker compositions have been used to reveal the likely source rock that produces oil. These oil seep samples contain a range in both the concentration of hydrocarbons present and certain level of biodegradation experienced. All sterane m/z 217 data display a familiar pattern of steranes with carbon numbers from 27 to 29 together with pregnane and homo-pregnanes, including rearranged steranes. Triterpane (m/z 191) data show a moderate content of tricyclic terpanes (Tri/C30H), medium to high ratio of norhopane/hopane (C29/C30), and medium to high abundant land plan marker such as resin bicadinanes(Bic/C30H) and oleananes (Ol/C30H). The presence of high abundant oleananes in these samples has been interpreted as the evidence for a marine influence during early diagenesis that may occur by marine or via re-deposition of peat organics in marine sediments. Hence, these results state that the organic matter facies for their source rock oil seep samples from the West Sulawesi region are detected as mixed between allochthonous macerals from typical terrestrial higher plants transported into the basin from distal swamps and soils and some marine organic matter.
The Magnetostratigraphy and the Age of So’a Basin Fossil-Bearing Sequence, Flores, Indonesia Yurnaldi, Dida; Setiawan, Ruly; Patriani, Emma Yan
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 5, No 3 (2018)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1741.172 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.221-234

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.5.3.221-234Three fossil-bearing intervals have been recognized in the Pleistocene So?a Basin, with the upper one holding important evidence of hominin fossils. The sequence also contains numerous in situ stone artifacts and fossils of other vertebrate taxa. Therefore, multiple dating techniques are crucial to secure the age of the fossil and artifact-bearing layers, especially the one with the hominin remains. This paper deals with the palaeomagnetic dating of the So?a Basin sequence to assist other dating methods that have been applied, and to refine the chronostratigraphy of the area. Palaeomagnetic sampling was conducted in four sections along a west to east transect. Four magnetozones can be recognized, consisting of two reverse and two normal polarity zones. By using the available radiometric ages as a guide and comparing the So?a Basin magnetostratigraphy with the Standard Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS), it became clear that both reverse magnetozones are part of the Matuyama Chron, while the normal magnetozones are the Jaramillo subchron and the Brunhes Chron. These palaeomagnetic dating results support the available radiometric dates and refine the age of the fossil-bearing deposits of the So?a Basin.

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