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Ivan Ferdian
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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience
ISSN : 23559314     EISSN : 23559306     DOI : -
Core Subject : Science,
The spirit to improve the journal to be more credible is increasing, and in 2012 it invited earth scientists in East and Southeast Asia as well as some western countries to join the journal for the editor positions in the Indonesia Journal of Geology. This is also to realize our present goal to internationalize the journal, The Indonesian Journal on Geoscience, which is open for papers of geology, geophysics, geochemistry, geodetics, geography, and soil science. This new born journal is expected to be published three times a year. As an international publication, of course it must all be written in an international language, in this case English. This adds difficulties to the effort to obtain good papers in English to publish although the credit points that an author will get are much higher.
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Articles 12 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 4, No 3 (2017)" : 12 Documents clear
Geomorphic Analysis in Determining Tectonic Activity Affected by Sumatra Fault in Liwa Region and Its Surrounding Area, Lampung, Indonesia Yudhicara, Yudhicara; Muslim, Dicky; Sudradjat, Adjat
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 4, No 3 (2017)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (3397.501 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.193-208

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.193-208The study discusses about characteristics of Sumatra Fault and its tectonic activity in Liwa and the adjacent area. The research uses quantitative methods of verification hypothetical deduction, which starts from the general approach, then it pursues into more specialized and focused ones. While the research work includes field measurements, remote sensing with GIS, and geomorphologic analysis using morphometry, such as: sinousity of mountain front (Smf), percentage of facets, ratio of the width and height of the valley (Vf), bifurcation ratios of the river (Rb), drainage density (Dd), shape of the watershed basin area (Bs), hypsometric curves (HI), and gradient index of stream length (SL). Basically, two blocks separated by the Sumatra Fault do not have a significant difference in tectonic activity, but the tectonic activity change can be seen when the studied area is divided into three blocks (northwest, middle, and southeast), then the change in each part can clearly be seen. Apparently, the tectonic activity in the studied area starts from the southeast continues toward the northwest. It is proved by this research, that geomorphological parameters which are associated with mountain fronts and watershed systems demonstrate the value of the activity increases towards the northwest. Hypsometric curves and a river analysis show that the tectonic activity in the northwest is relatively in a young stage, while towards the southeast it is getting in a mature stage.
Seismic Anisotropy Analysis Beneath Sumatra Revealed by Shear-Wave Splitting Candra, Arya Dwi; Santosa, Bagus Jaya; Rachman, Gazali
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 4, No 3 (2017)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1955.14 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.169-179

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.169-179A shear-wave splitting analysis was determined to observe anisotropic structures of an upper mantle layer beneath Sumatra. The data were collected from 35 BMKG stations with the magnitude of more than 6.25 Mw and the epicentre of 85o - 140o. A shear-wave splitting measurement was calculated by using Splitlab based on three methods simultaneously. The result of the shear-wave splitting measurement in the Sumatra Forearc and Fault Zone shows that there are two anisotropic layers. The first layer has a dominant-fast-polarization direction that is parallel with a trench, and has the delay time duration of 0.5 - 0.9 s-. It is presumed that it is caused by a shear-strain as a result of the existences of Mentawai and Sumatra Fault Zones. The second layer has a dominant-fast-polarization direction that is perpendicular to the trench with the delay time duration of about 1.1 - 1.9 s-. It is presumed that it is caused by a movement of a subduction plate on a mantle wedge. The measurement in the backarc shows that there is only one anisotropic layer that is a subduction plate. It is also found that there is a transition of an orientation change on the subduction plate between Sumatra and Java. The change of the polarization direction is probably related to the age difference and the direction velocity of the absolute plate movement (APM) from Sumatra to Java.
Atoll Reef Geomorphology of Sagori Island, SE Sulawesi: A Reconnaissance Study Solihuddin, Tubagus
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 4, No 3 (2017)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (4258.025 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.181-191

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.181-191The Sagori Atoll of the Kabaena Island, SE Sulawesi is one of Indonesia’s remote tropical reefs and such has received little attention from reef researchers. Non of early scientific expeditions reported either geomorphology or ecology of the Sagori Atoll in detail. This study is the first investigation of the reef geomorphology and associated habitats of Sagori Atoll within a biodiversity of “Coral reef Triangle Initiative - CTI” region, using data from satellite imagery and on ground observation. The Sagori Atoll environment consists of reef-island, atoll rim, and lagoon in which six habitats are associated, including: sand cay, coralgal pavement, sand sheet (intertidal and subtidal), sand-hardground striation, and outer atoll rim and lagoon (shallow and deep). The reef-island is built from sediments that are entirely calcareous, resting on a platform of lithified coral conglomerate. The atoll rim is dominated by coralgal pavement consisting mainly of both encrusting and living coralline algae. The lagoon which is a semi-enclosed pool and opens to the eastern side, consists of sand and scattered corals. The atoll formation is considered to be of nonvolcanic origin, but is rising from the depth of due to anticlinal island subsidence.
Site Specific Ground Response Analysis for Quantifying Site Amplification at A Regolith Site Setiawan, Bambang
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 4, No 3 (2017)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1028.898 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.159-167

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.159-167A numerical model has demonstrated that it can simulate reasonably well earthquake motions at the ground level during a seismic event. The most widely used model is an equivalent linear approach. The equivalent linear model was used to compute the free-field response of Adelaide regolith during the 1997 Burra earthquake. The aim of this study is to quantify the amplification at the investigated site. The model computed the ground response of horizontally layered soil deposits subjected to transient and vertically propagating shear waves through a one-dimensional-soil column. Each soil layer was assumed to be homogeneous, visco-elastic, and infinite in the horizontal extent. The results of this study were compared to other studies and forward computation of the geotechnical dynamic parameters of the investigated site. The amplification triggered by the 1997 Burra seismic event was deduced. This study reveals the amplification factor up to 3.6 at the studied site.
Petrographic Characteristics and Depositional Environment Evolution of Middle Miocene Sediments in the Thien Ung - Mang Cau Structure of Nam Con Son Basin Ngoc, Pham Bao; Nghi, Tran; Tin, Nguyen Trong; Tri, Tran Van; Tuyen, Nguyen Thi; Dung, Tran Thi; Thao, Nguyen Thi Phuong
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 4, No 3 (2017)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.143-157

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.143-157This paper introduces the petrographic characteristics and depositional environment of Middle Miocene rocks of the Thien Ung - Mang Cau structure in the central area of Nam Con Son Basin based on the results of analyzing thin sections and structural characteristics of core samples. Middle Miocene sedimentary rocks in the studied area can be divided into three groups: (1) Group of terrigenous rocks comprising greywacke sandstone, arkosic sandstone, lithic-quartz sandstone, greywacke-lithic sandstone, oligomictic siltstone, and bitumenous claystone; (2) Group of carbonate rocks comprising dolomitic limestone and bituminous limestone; (3) Mixed group comprising calcareous sandstone, calcarinate sandstone, arenaceous limestone, calcareous claystone, calcareous silty claystone, dolomitic limestone containing silt, and bitumen. The depositional environment is expressed through petrographic characteristics and structure of the sedimentary rocks in core samples. The greywacke and arkosic sandstones are of medium grain size, poor sorting and roundness, and siliceous cement characterizing the alluvial and estuarine fan environment expressed by massive structure of core samples. The mixed calcareous limestone, arenaceous dolomitic limestone, and calcareous and bituminous clayey siltstone in the core samples are of turbulent flow structure characterizing shallow bay environment with the action of bottom currents. The dolomitic limestones are of relatively homogeneous, of microgranular and fine-granular texture, precipitated in a weakly reducing, semi-closed, and relatively calm bay environment.
Fracture Characteristics of Mélange Complex Basement in Bantimala Area, South Sulawesi, Indonesia Sapiie, Benyamin; Nugraha, Muhamad Aziz; Wardana, Rizky Kurniawan; Rifiyanto, Arif
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 4, No 3 (2017)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (10160.453 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.121-141

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.121-141A detailed geological mapping and fracture characterization had been performed in Bantimala area, South Sulawesi, Indonesia. The geology of the studied area is composed of pre-Tertiary metamorphic, sedimentary, and igneous rocks which tectonically mixed forming a mélange complex. Located on the southeastern margin of Sundaland, the tectonic strongly influences the fracture occurrences in the studied area. A total of 3,841 fractures comprising shear fractures, extension fractures, veins, and joints have been measured and analyzed. The common fracture orientations are NW - SE, W - E, NNE - SSW, and ENE - WSW trends. Fractures developing in Bantimala have clearly been controlled by lithology and structure position (i.e. fault zones and fold hinge). The orientation of fractures in Bantimala area is different on each lithology, showing that the fracture system was complex. Fracture intensity in schist is higher compared to the other lithologies. The 3D fracture modeling through 3D geocellular modeling was generated using the result from field data measurements and analyses. Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) was built by fifty-one fracture sets that were analyzed from field measurement data. However, the estimation of average fracture porosity from modeling varies significantly depending on lithology. The value of fracture porosity is relatively small, varied from 0.0004 to 0.0029 %. A high fracture porosity number is observed in an area with a significant fracture intensity and most crosscutting of fracture which in turn is controlled by faults and lithology. A mélange complex can have high potential as a basement fractured reservoir target, where fracture distributions and their attributes will vary depending on the lithology as well as local deformation.
Fracture Characteristics of Mélange Complex Basement in Bantimala Area, South Sulawesi, Indonesia Sapiie, Benyamin; Nugraha, Muhamad Aziz; Wardana, Rizky Kurniawan; Rifiyanto, Arif
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 4, No 3 (2017)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (10160.453 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.121-141

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.121-141A detailed geological mapping and fracture characterization had been performed in Bantimala area, South Sulawesi, Indonesia. The geology of the studied area is composed of pre-Tertiary metamorphic, sedimentary, and igneous rocks which tectonically mixed forming a mélange complex. Located on the southeastern margin of Sundaland, the tectonic strongly influences the fracture occurrences in the studied area. A total of 3,841 fractures comprising shear fractures, extension fractures, veins, and joints have been measured and analyzed. The common fracture orientations are NW - SE, W - E, NNE - SSW, and ENE - WSW trends. Fractures developing in Bantimala have clearly been controlled by lithology and structure position (i.e. fault zones and fold hinge). The orientation of fractures in Bantimala area is different on each lithology, showing that the fracture system was complex. Fracture intensity in schist is higher compared to the other lithologies. The 3D fracture modeling through 3D geocellular modeling was generated using the result from field data measurements and analyses. Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) was built by fifty-one fracture sets that were analyzed from field measurement data. However, the estimation of average fracture porosity from modeling varies significantly depending on lithology. The value of fracture porosity is relatively small, varied from 0.0004 to 0.0029 %. A high fracture porosity number is observed in an area with a significant fracture intensity and most crosscutting of fracture which in turn is controlled by faults and lithology. A mélange complex can have high potential as a basement fractured reservoir target, where fracture distributions and their attributes will vary depending on the lithology as well as local deformation.
Petrographic Characteristics and Depositional Environment Evolution of Middle Miocene Sediments in the Thien Ung - Mang Cau Structure of Nam Con Son Basin Ngoc, Pham Bao; Nghi, Tran; Tin, Nguyen Trong; Tri, Tran Van; Tuyen, Nguyen Thi; Dung, Tran Thi; Thao, Nguyen Thi Phuong
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 4, No 3 (2017)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.143-157

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.143-157This paper introduces the petrographic characteristics and depositional environment of Middle Miocene rocks of the Thien Ung - Mang Cau structure in the central area of Nam Con Son Basin based on the results of analyzing thin sections and structural characteristics of core samples. Middle Miocene sedimentary rocks in the studied area can be divided into three groups: (1) Group of terrigenous rocks comprising greywacke sandstone, arkosic sandstone, lithic-quartz sandstone, greywacke-lithic sandstone, oligomictic siltstone, and bitumenous claystone; (2) Group of carbonate rocks comprising dolomitic limestone and bituminous limestone; (3) Mixed group comprising calcareous sandstone, calcarinate sandstone, arenaceous limestone, calcareous claystone, calcareous silty claystone, dolomitic limestone containing silt, and bitumen. The depositional environment is expressed through petrographic characteristics and structure of the sedimentary rocks in core samples. The greywacke and arkosic sandstones are of medium grain size, poor sorting and roundness, and siliceous cement characterizing the alluvial and estuarine fan environment expressed by massive structure of core samples. The mixed calcareous limestone, arenaceous dolomitic limestone, and calcareous and bituminous clayey siltstone in the core samples are of turbulent flow structure characterizing shallow bay environment with the action of bottom currents. The dolomitic limestones are of relatively homogeneous, of microgranular and fine-granular texture, precipitated in a weakly reducing, semi-closed, and relatively calm bay environment.
Site Specific Ground Response Analysis for Quantifying Site Amplification at A Regolith Site Setiawan, Bambang
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 4, No 3 (2017)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1028.898 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.159-167

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.159-167A numerical model has demonstrated that it can simulate reasonably well earthquake motions at the ground level during a seismic event. The most widely used model is an equivalent linear approach. The equivalent linear model was used to compute the free-field response of Adelaide regolith during the 1997 Burra earthquake. The aim of this study is to quantify the amplification at the investigated site. The model computed the ground response of horizontally layered soil deposits subjected to transient and vertically propagating shear waves through a one-dimensional-soil column. Each soil layer was assumed to be homogeneous, visco-elastic, and infinite in the horizontal extent. The results of this study were compared to other studies and forward computation of the geotechnical dynamic parameters of the investigated site. The amplification triggered by the 1997 Burra seismic event was deduced. This study reveals the amplification factor up to 3.6 at the studied site.
Seismic Anisotropy Analysis Beneath Sumatra Revealed by Shear-Wave Splitting Candra, Arya Dwi; Santosa, Bagus Jaya; Rachman, Gazali
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 4, No 3 (2017)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1955.14 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.169-179

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.4.3.169-179A shear-wave splitting analysis was determined to observe anisotropic structures of an upper mantle layer beneath Sumatra. The data were collected from 35 BMKG stations with the magnitude of more than 6.25 Mw and the epicentre of 85o - 140o. A shear-wave splitting measurement was calculated by using Splitlab based on three methods simultaneously. The result of the shear-wave splitting measurement in the Sumatra Forearc and Fault Zone shows that there are two anisotropic layers. The first layer has a dominant-fast-polarization direction that is parallel with a trench, and has the delay time duration of 0.5 - 0.9 s-. It is presumed that it is caused by a shear-strain as a result of the existences of Mentawai and Sumatra Fault Zones. The second layer has a dominant-fast-polarization direction that is perpendicular to the trench with the delay time duration of about 1.1 - 1.9 s-. It is presumed that it is caused by a movement of a subduction plate on a mantle wedge. The measurement in the backarc shows that there is only one anisotropic layer that is a subduction plate. It is also found that there is a transition of an orientation change on the subduction plate between Sumatra and Java. The change of the polarization direction is probably related to the age difference and the direction velocity of the absolute plate movement (APM) from Sumatra to Java.

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