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Ivan Ferdian
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INDONESIA
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience
ISSN : 23559314     EISSN : 23559306     DOI : -
Core Subject : Science,
The spirit to improve the journal to be more credible is increasing, and in 2012 it invited earth scientists in East and Southeast Asia as well as some western countries to join the journal for the editor positions in the Indonesia Journal of Geology. This is also to realize our present goal to internationalize the journal, The Indonesian Journal on Geoscience, which is open for papers of geology, geophysics, geochemistry, geodetics, geography, and soil science. This new born journal is expected to be published three times a year. As an international publication, of course it must all be written in an international language, in this case English. This adds difficulties to the effort to obtain good papers in English to publish although the credit points that an author will get are much higher.
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Articles 10 Documents
Search results for , issue "Vol 1, No 2 (2014)" : 10 Documents clear
Depositional Cycles of Muara Wahau Coals, Kutai Basin, East Kalimantan Anggayana, Komang; Rahmad, Basuki; Widayat, Agus Haris
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 1, No 2 (2014)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1304.555 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.1.2.109-119

Abstract

http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.v1i2.183Fifteen samples were taken ply by ply from a 33 m thick drill core of Muara Wahau coal seams for interpretation of depositional environments. Generally, lithotype variation in the bottom part of the coal seams has a lower frequency than in the upper part. Petrographical analysis was performed to determine the maceral composition, groundwater index (GWI), and gelification index (GI). The samples from lower sections show much higher GWI-GI values and lower variation frequency than from the upper section. This characteristic is interpreted as the result of development of mesotrophic to ombrotrophic peats during the deposition of lower to upper parts of the section, respectively. During the development of the mesotrophic peat, water was more abundant and relatively stable in budget. However, during the development of ombrotrophic peat, water was less abundant and relatively not stable in budget. The latter is related to the water supply depending only on rain, resulted in the more sensitive water table in the om- brotrophic peat. The unstable water table is thought as the reason of higher variation frequency of lithotype, GWI, GI, as well as maceral composition in the upper part of the core. Unstable water table would lead to moist condition in the uppermost layer of the ombrotrophic peat, favoring fungi to grow. This is confirmed by the higher abundance of sclerotinite maceral in samples from the upper part of the coal core.
A Drowning Sunda Shelf Model during Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and Holocene: A Review Solihuddin, Tubagus
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 1, No 2 (2014)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1022.155 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.1.2.99-107

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i2.182Rising sea levels since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), some ~20,000 years ago, has drowned the Sunda Shelf and generated the complex coastal morphology as seen today. The pattern of drowning of the shelf will be utilized to assess likely timing of shoreline displacements and the duration of shelf exposure during the postglacial sea level rise. From existing sea level records around Sunda Shelf region, “sea level curve” was assembled to reconstruct the shelf drowning events. A five stage drowning model is proposed, including 1) maximum exposure of the shelf at approximately 20,500 years Before Present (y.B.P.), when sea level had fallen to about -118 m below present sea level (bpl.), 2) melt water pulse (MWP) 1A at ~14,000 y.B.P. when sea level rose to about -80 m bpl., 3) melt water pulse (MWP) 1B at ~11,500 y.B.P., when sea level was predicted around -50 m bpl., 4) Early-Holocene at ~9,700 y.B.P, when sea level was predicted at about-30 m bpl, and 5) sea level high stand at ~4,000 y.B.P., when sea level jumped to approx. +5 m above present sea level (apl.). This study shows that the sea level fluctuated by more than 120 m at various times during LGM and Holocene. Also confirmed that sea level curve of Sunda Shelf seems to fit well when combined with sea level curve from Barbados, although the comparison remains controversial until now due to the considerable distinction of tectonic and hydro-isostatic settings.  
Epithermal Gold-Silver Deposits in Western Java, Indonesia: Gold-Silver Selenide-Telluride Mineralization Yuningsih, Euis Tintin; Matsueda, Hiroharu; Rosana, Mega Fatimah
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 1, No 2 (2014)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (601.476 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.1.2.71-81

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i2.180The gold-silver ores of western Java reflect a major metallogenic event during the Miocene-Pliocene and Pliocene ages. Mineralogically, the deposits can be divided into two types i.e. Se- and Te-type deposits with some different characteristic features. The objective of the present research is to summarize the mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of Se- and Te-type epithermal mineralization in western Java. Ore and alteration mineral assemblage, fluid inclusions, and radiogenic isotope studies were undertaken in some deposits in western Java combined with literature studies from previous authors. Ore mineralogy of some deposits from western Java such as Pongkor, Cibaliung, Cikidang, Cisungsang, Cirotan, Arinem, and Cineam shows slightly different characteristics as those are divided into Se- and Te-types deposits. The ore mineralogy of the westernmost of west Java region such as Pongkor, Cibaliung, Cikidang, Cisungsang, and Cirotan is characterized by the dominance of silver-arsenic-antimony sulfosalt with silver selenides and rarely tellurides over the argentite, while to the eastern part of West Java such as Arinem and Cineam deposits are dominated by silver-gold tellurides. The average formation temperatures measured from fluid inclusions of quartz associated with ore are in the range of 170 – 220°C with average salinity of less than 1 wt% NaClequiv for Se-type and 190 – 270°C with average salinity of ~2 wt% NaClequiv for Te-type.
Reservoir Modeling of Carbonate on Fika Field: The Challenge to Capture the Complexity of Rock and Oil Types Adji, Erawati Fitriyani; Asrul, Febrian; Arham, M. Aidil; Wisnubroto, Bayu
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 1, No 2 (2014)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1136.117 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.1.2.83-97

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i2.181The carbonate on Fika Field has a special character, because it grew above a basement high with the thickness and internal character variation. To develop the field, a proper geological model which can be used in reservoir simulation was needed. This model has to represent the complexity of the rock type and the variety of oil types among the clusters. Creating this model was challenging due to the heterogeneity of the Baturaja Formation (BRF): Early Miocene reef, carbonate platform, and breccia conglomerate grew up above the basement with a variety of thickness and quality distributions. The reservoir thickness varies between 23 - 600 ft and 3D seismic frequency ranges from 1 - 80 Hz with 25 Hz dominant frequency. Structurally, the Fika Field has a high basement slope, which has an impact on the flow unit layering slope. Based on production data, each area shows different characteristics and performance: some areas have high water cut and low cumulative production. Oil properties from several clusters also vary in wax content. The wax content can potentially build up a deposit inside tubing and flow-line, resulted in a possible disturbance to the operation. Five well cores were analyzed, including thin section and XRD. Seven check-shot data and 3D seismic Pre-Stack Time Migration (PSTM) were available with limited seismic resolution. A seismic analysis was done after well seismic tie was completed. This analysis included paleogeography, depth structure map, and distribution of reservoir and basement. Core and log data generated facies carbonate distribution and rock typing, defining properties for log analysis and permeability prediction for each zone. An Sw prediction for each well was created by J-function analysis. This elaborates capillary pressure from core data, so it is very similar to the real conditions. Different stages of the initial model were done i.e. scale-up properties, data analysis, variogram modeling, and then the properties were distributed using the geostatistic method. Finally, after G&G collaborated with petrophysicists and reservoir engineers to complete their integrated analysis, a geological model was finally created. After that, material balance was needed to confirm reserve calculations. The result of OOIP (Original Oil in Place) and OGIP (Original Gas in Place) were confirmed, because it was similar to the production data and reservoir pressure. The model was then ready to be used in reservoir simulation. 
Seasonal variation of δ13C content in Porites coral from Simeulue Island waters for the period of 1993-2007 Cahyarini, Sri Yudawati
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 1, No 2 (2014)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (725.608 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.1.2.65-70

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i2.179Variation of δ13C content in coral skeletons shows the influence of metabolic fractionation in aragonite coral. Understanding coral δ13C variation can thus be useful to more understand e.g. past bleaching event which is further useful for coral health and conservation. In this study, δ13C content in Porites coral from Labuhan Bajau, Simeulue Islands was analyzed. To know the correlation between variation of coral δ13C and light intensity, the monthly variation of coral δ13C is compared to solar radiation and cloud cover. The result shows that for the period of 2003 to 2008, coral δ13C shows it is well correlated (r=0.42 p=0.153) with cloud cover variation in annual mean scale. Meanwhile, in seasonal mean variation, coral δ13C is strongly influenced (r=0.85 p<0.0001) by cloud cover with 1 - 2 month time lag. Comparing to the solar radiation (cloud cover), SST influences dominantly the variation of coral δ13C from southern Simeulue Island waters (LB sample) in an annual mean scale than in a seasonal scale. 
Seasonal variation of δ13C content in Porites coral from Simeulue Island waters for the period of 1993-2007 Cahyarini, Sri Yudawati
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 1, No 2 (2014)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (725.608 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.1.2.65-70

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i2.179Variation of ?13C content in coral skeletons shows the influence of metabolic fractionation in aragonite coral. Understanding coral ?13C variation can thus be useful to more understand e.g. past bleaching event which is further useful for coral health and conservation. In this study, ?13C content in Porites coral from Labuhan Bajau, Simeulue Islands was analyzed. To know the correlation between variation of coral ?13C and light intensity, the monthly variation of coral ?13C is compared to solar radiation and cloud cover. The result shows that for the period of 2003 to 2008, coral ?13C shows it is well correlated (r=0.42 p=0.153) with cloud cover variation in annual mean scale. Meanwhile, in seasonal mean variation, coral ?13C is strongly influenced (r=0.85 p<0.0001) by cloud cover with 1 - 2 month time lag. Comparing to the solar radiation (cloud cover), SST influences dominantly the variation of coral ?13C from southern Simeulue Island waters (LB sample) in an annual mean scale than in a seasonal scale. 
Epithermal Gold-Silver Deposits in Western Java, Indonesia: Gold-Silver Selenide-Telluride Mineralization Yuningsih, Euis Tintin; Matsueda, Hiroharu; Rosana, Mega Fatimah
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 1, No 2 (2014)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (601.476 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.1.2.71-81

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i2.180The gold-silver ores of western Java reflect a major metallogenic event during the Miocene-Pliocene and Pliocene ages. Mineralogically, the deposits can be divided into two types i.e. Se- and Te-type deposits with some different characteristic features. The objective of the present research is to summarize the mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of Se- and Te-type epithermal mineralization in western Java. Ore and alteration mineral assemblage, fluid inclusions, and radiogenic isotope studies were undertaken in some deposits in western Java combined with literature studies from previous authors. Ore mineralogy of some deposits from western Java such as Pongkor, Cibaliung, Cikidang, Cisungsang, Cirotan, Arinem, and Cineam shows slightly different characteristics as those are divided into Se- and Te-types deposits. The ore mineralogy of the westernmost of west Java region such as Pongkor, Cibaliung, Cikidang, Cisungsang, and Cirotan is characterized by the dominance of silver-arsenic-antimony sulfosalt with silver selenides and rarely tellurides over the argentite, while to the eastern part of West Java such as Arinem and Cineam deposits are dominated by silver-gold tellurides. The average formation temperatures measured from fluid inclusions of quartz associated with ore are in the range of 170 ? 220°C with average salinity of less than 1 wt% NaClequiv for Se-type and 190 ? 270°C with average salinity of ~2 wt% NaClequiv for Te-type.
Reservoir Modeling of Carbonate on Fika Field: The Challenge to Capture the Complexity of Rock and Oil Types Adji, Erawati Fitriyani; Asrul, Febrian; Arham, M. Aidil; Wisnubroto, Bayu
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 1, No 2 (2014)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1136.117 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.1.2.83-97

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i2.181The carbonate on Fika Field has a special character, because it grew above a basement high with the thickness and internal character variation. To develop the field, a proper geological model which can be used in reservoir simulation was needed. This model has to represent the complexity of the rock type and the variety of oil types among the clusters. Creating this model was challenging due to the heterogeneity of the Baturaja Formation (BRF): Early Miocene reef, carbonate platform, and breccia conglomerate grew up above the basement with a variety of thickness and quality distributions. The reservoir thickness varies between 23 - 600 ft and 3D seismic frequency ranges from 1 - 80 Hz with 25 Hz dominant frequency. Structurally, the Fika Field has a high basement slope, which has an impact on the flow unit layering slope. Based on production data, each area shows different characteristics and performance: some areas have high water cut and low cumulative production. Oil properties from several clusters also vary in wax content. The wax content can potentially build up a deposit inside tubing and flow-line, resulted in a possible disturbance to the operation. Five well cores were analyzed, including thin section and XRD. Seven check-shot data and 3D seismic Pre-Stack Time Migration (PSTM) were available with limited seismic resolution. A seismic analysis was done after well seismic tie was completed. This analysis included paleogeography, depth structure map, and distribution of reservoir and basement. Core and log data generated facies carbonate distribution and rock typing, defining properties for log analysis and permeability prediction for each zone. An Sw prediction for each well was created by J-function analysis. This elaborates capillary pressure from core data, so it is very similar to the real conditions. Different stages of the initial model were done i.e. scale-up properties, data analysis, variogram modeling, and then the properties were distributed using the geostatistic method. Finally, after G&G collaborated with petrophysicists and reservoir engineers to complete their integrated analysis, a geological model was finally created. After that, material balance was needed to confirm reserve calculations. The result of OOIP (Original Oil in Place) and OGIP (Original Gas in Place) were confirmed, because it was similar to the production data and reservoir pressure. The model was then ready to be used in reservoir simulation. 
A Drowning Sunda Shelf Model during Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) and Holocene: A Review Solihuddin, Tubagus
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 1, No 2 (2014)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1022.155 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.1.2.99-107

Abstract

DOI: 10.17014/ijog.v1i2.182Rising sea levels since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), some ~20,000 years ago, has drowned the Sunda Shelf and generated the complex coastal morphology as seen today. The pattern of drowning of the shelf will be utilized to assess likely timing of shoreline displacements and the duration of shelf exposure during the postglacial sea level rise. From existing sea level records around Sunda Shelf region, ?sea level curve? was assembled to reconstruct the shelf drowning events. A five stage drowning model is proposed, including 1) maximum exposure of the shelf at approximately 20,500 years Before Present (y.B.P.), when sea level had fallen to about -118 m below present sea level (bpl.), 2) melt water pulse (MWP) 1A at ~14,000 y.B.P. when sea level rose to about -80 m bpl., 3) melt water pulse (MWP) 1B at ~11,500 y.B.P., when sea level was predicted around -50 m bpl., 4) Early-Holocene at ~9,700 y.B.P, when sea level was predicted at about-30 m bpl, and 5) sea level high stand at ~4,000 y.B.P., when sea level jumped to approx. +5 m above present sea level (apl.). This study shows that the sea level fluctuated by more than 120 m at various times during LGM and Holocene. Also confirmed that sea level curve of Sunda Shelf seems to fit well when combined with sea level curve from Barbados, although the comparison remains controversial until now due to the considerable distinction of tectonic and hydro-isostatic settings.  
Depositional Cycles of Muara Wahau Coals, Kutai Basin, East Kalimantan Anggayana, Komang; Rahmad, Basuki; Widayat, Agus Haris
Indonesian Journal on Geoscience Vol 1, No 2 (2014)
Publisher : Geological Agency

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1304.555 KB) | DOI: 10.17014/ijog.1.2.109-119

Abstract

http://dx.doi.org/10.17014/ijog.v1i2.183Fifteen samples were taken ply by ply from a 33 m thick drill core of Muara Wahau coal seams for interpretation of depositional environments. Generally, lithotype variation in the bottom part of the coal seams has a lower frequency than in the upper part. Petrographical analysis was performed to determine the maceral composition, groundwater index (GWI), and gelification index (GI). The samples from lower sections show much higher GWI-GI values and lower variation frequency than from the upper section. This characteristic is interpreted as the result of development of mesotrophic to ombrotrophic peats during the deposition of lower to upper parts of the section, respectively. During the development of the mesotrophic peat, water was more abundant and relatively stable in budget. However, during the development of ombrotrophic peat, water was less abundant and relatively not stable in budget. The latter is related to the water supply depending only on rain, resulted in the more sensitive water table in the om- brotrophic peat. The unstable water table is thought as the reason of higher variation frequency of lithotype, GWI, GI, as well as maceral composition in the upper part of the core. Unstable water table would lead to moist condition in the uppermost layer of the ombrotrophic peat, favoring fungi to grow. This is confirmed by the higher abundance of sclerotinite maceral in samples from the upper part of the coal core.

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