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Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior
ISSN : -     EISSN : 25490281     DOI : -
Core Subject : Health,
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (JHPB) is an electronic, open-access, double-blind and peer-reviewed international journal, focusing on health promotion and health-related behaviors. It began its publication on May 21, 2015. The journal is published four times yearly. It seeks to understand factors at various layers associated with health behavior and health-impacting policy and find evidence-based social and behavioral strategies to improve population health status.
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Articles 98 Documents
Factors Associated with Healthy Preventive Behavior among the Elderly in Lamongan, East Java Jannah, Nurul; Tamtomo, Didik; Soemanto, RB
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior Vol 3, No 4 (2018)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Abstract

Background: Health promotion behaviors in the elderly have potential effects in promoting health and quality of life and reducing the cost of health care services. Changes in the lifestyle of the people affected by cardiovascular diseases have more potential shares in reducing vascular problems than medicinal treatments of hypertension and high cholesterol. By convincing more people to maintain and obtain healthy lifestyles, there will be considerable reduction in emergence and disabilities due to cardiac problems. This study aimed to determine factors associated with health preventive behavior among the elderly in Lamongan, East Java.Subjects and Method: This was a cross sectional study conducted in Lamongan, East Java, from November to December 2018. A sample of 200 elderly was selected by stratified random sampling. The dependent variable was health behavior. The independent variables were education, attitude, peer support, family support, cadre support, perceived behavioral control, subjective norm, and intention. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by a multiple linear regression.Results: Health behavior in elderly was influenced by education (b = 0.76; 95% CI = 0.27 to 1.24; p = 0.002), intention (b= 0.08; 95% CI = 0.01 to 0.16; p = 0.033), attitude (b = 0.20; 95% CI = 0.07 to 0.33; p= 0.002), perceived behavioral control (b= 0.18; 95% CI= 0.06 to 0.30; p= 0.002), family support (b = 0.19 ; 95% CI = 0.08 to 0.30; p = 0.001), cadre support (b = 0.13; 95% CI = 0.04 to 0.23; p = 0.005), peer support (b = 0.07; 95% CI = - 0.01 to 0.15; p = 0.060), and subjective norm (b = 0.10; 95% CI = - 0.01 to 0.22; p = 0.064).Conclusion: Health behavior in elderly is influenced by education, intention, attitude, perceived behavioral control, family support, cadre support, peer support, and subjective norm.Keywords: health behavior, elderly, linear regressionCorrespondence: Nurul Jannah. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java, Indonesia. Email: njannah.31@gmail.com. Mobile: +6282230300405.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior, 2018, 3(4): 223-229https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.04.01
Sexual Behavior for HIV Prevention among Men who Have Sex with Men in Surakarta Alifia, Latifah Nur; Joebagio, Hermanu; Murti, Bhisma
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior Vol 3, No 3 (2018)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Abstract

Background: To date HIV/AIDS is still a serious global health problem with an ever-increasing incidence. HIV risk in men who have sex with men (MSM) is 27 times greater than in the general population. This study aimed to analyze the sexual behavior for HIV prevention among MSM in Surakarta using the Health Belief Model (HBM).Subjects and Method: This was a qualitative analytical study with a phenomenology approach. It was carried out in Surakarta Mahardhika Style Community, Central Java. The key informants in this study were the Chairperson of the Gaya Mahardhika Community, with their members as the main informants. The supporting informants consisted of health personnel from the Prevention and Control Program at the City Health Office, and the Surakarta City AIDS Commission Informants were selected for this study by purposive sampling. The data were collected by in-depth interview, non-participatory observation, and document observation. The data were analyzed by the method of Miles and Huberman.Results: MSM communities in Surakarta understood the concept of HIV/AIDS and knew how to prevent it. But in reality, the prevention behavior has not really been done as evidenced by all the main informants having more than one partner. Nevertheless, all informants stated that they always used condoms and always checked voluntary counseling test (VCT) regularly. MSM communities consider themselves at risk, believe that HIV/AIDS is a dangerous disease, feel the benefits of HIV/AIDS prevention measures carried out. The obstacles faced are lack of comfort when using condoms and difficulties to be loyal to one partner. They feel the importance of HIV/AIDS preventive behavior. They are sure to be able to implement HIV/AIDS preventive behavior.Conclusion: Knowledge of HIV/AIDS risk factors is important. The HIV/AIDS preventive behavior applied by MSM is influenced by knowledge, perceived severity, perceived vulnerability, perceived benefit, perceived barrier, cues to action, and self-efficacy.Keywords: HIV prevention, men who have sex with men, Health Belief ModelCorrespondence: Latifah Nur Alifia. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret. Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, Surakarta, Central Java 57126, Indonesia. Email: Latifahnuralifia@gmail.com. Mobile: 08562623045.Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health 2018, 3(3): 179-191https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.03.05
Theory of Planned Behavior on the Determinants of Cosmetic Hormones Use to Overcome Gender Dysphoria among Transgenders in Yogyakarta, Indonesia Miden, Destinady Kadiser; Prasetya, Hanung; Murti, Bhisma
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior Vol 3, No 3 (2018)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Abstract

Background: Gender dysphoria refers to discomfort or distress that is caused by a discrepancy between an individual’s gender identity and the gender assigned at birth (and the associated gender role and/or primary and secondary sex characteristics). Gender reassignment surgery is performed to change primary and/or secondary sex characteristics. For a male to female gender reassignment, surgical procedures may include genital reconstruction (vaginoplasty, penectomy, orchidectomy, clitoroplasty) and cosmetic surgery (breast implants, facial reshaping, rhinoplasty, abdominoplasty, thyroid chondroplasty (laryngeal shaving), voice modification surgery (vocal cord shortening), hair transplants). This study aimed to examine the determinants of cosmetic hormones among transgender in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, using Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB).Subjects and Method: This was a cross-sectional study carried out in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, in November 2018. A sample of 201 transgender was selected by snowball sampling and fixed disease sampling, consisting of 67 transgender using cosmetic hormone and 134 transgender not using the cosmetic hormone. The dependent variable was the use of cosmetic hormones. The independent variables were age, knowledge, education, intention, attitude, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norm. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by path analysis.Results: Cosmetic hormone use was directly increased by strong intention (b= 1.65; 95% CI= 0.98 to 2.31; p<0.001), positive attitude (b= 1.15; 95% CI= 0.48 to 1.81; p= 0.001), but decreased by strong perceived behavioral control not to use cosmetic hormone (b= -1.02; 95% CI= -1.70 to -0.34; p=0.003). Cosmetic hormone use was indirectly affected by age, education, locus of control, attitude, perceived behavioral control, subjective norm, and social norm.Conclusion: Cosmetic hormone use is directly increased by strong intention, positive attitude, but decreased by strong perceived behavioral control not to use the cosmetic hormone. Cosmetic hormone use is indirectly affected by age, education, the locus of control, attitude, perceived behavioral control, subjective norm, and social norm.Keywords: cosmetic hormone, transgender, Theory of Planned BehaviorCorrespondence: Destinady Kadiser Miden. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret. Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: destinady.kmiden@gmail.com. Mobile: 085328999232.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(3): 212-222https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.03.08 
The Contextual Effect of School on the Premarital Sex among Adolescents in Bantul, Yogyakarta Pertiwi, Galuh Tunjung; Prasetya, Hanung; Murti, Bhisma
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior Vol 3, No 4 (2018)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Abstract

Background: Previous studies have identified individual and school‐level characteristics that are associated with sexual risk‐taking. But similar studies in Indonesia is lacking. This study aimed to examine the contextual effect of school on the premarital sex among adolescents in Bantul, Yogyakarta.Subjects and Method: This was a cross-sectional study carried out at 25 senior high schools in Bantul, Yogyakarta, from November to December 2018. A sample of 225 adolescents aged 15-18 years was selected by stratified random sampling. The dependent variable was premarital sex. The independent variables were the intention, subjective norm, perceived behavior control, family intimacy, and peer group. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by a multilevel logistic regression on Stata 13.Results: Premarital sex incrased with favorable intention (b= 2.70; 95% CI= 0.50 to 3.15; p= 0.007), subjective norm (b= 4.66; 95% CI= 1.89 to 4.63; p<0.001), and suitable peer group (b= 4.34; 95% CI= 1.99 to 5.28; p<0.001). Premarital sex decreased with positive attitude (b= -4.31; 95% CI= -4.15 to -1.55; p<0.001), strong perceived behavior control (b= -2.37; 95% CI= -2.53 to -0.23; p=0.018), and strong family intimacy (b= -2.44; 95% CI= -2.69 to 0.29; p=0.015). There was contextual effect of school on premarital sex with ICC= 63.72%.Conclusion: Premarital sex increases with favorable intention, subjective norm, and suitable peer group. Premarital sex decreases with positive attitude, strong perceived behavior control, and strong family intimacy. There is a contextual effect of school on premarital sex, which calls for attention.Keywords: premarital sex, school, multilevel analysisCorrespondence: Galuh Tunjung Pertiwi. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Sura­karta, Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: galuh­pertiwi2017­@gmail.­com. Mobile: +6281229722373.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(4): 240-247https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.04.03 
Path Analysis on the Risk Factors of Sexually Transmitted Disease among Men Who Have Sex with Men Community in Surakarta Nurhalimah, Siti; Prasetya, Hanung; Murti, Bhisma
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior Vol 3, No 3 (2018)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Abstract

Background: Men who have sex with men (MSM) have a higher prevalence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI) than the heterosexual men. The number of STI cases in MSM in Indonesia in 2017 was 4,144. The study aimed to examine risk factors of sexually transmitted disease among MSM community in Surakarta, Central Java.Subjects and Method: This was a cross-sectional study carried out in Surakarta, Central Java, from October to November 2018. A sample of 188 MSM was selected by fixed diseases sampling. The variable dependent was STI. The independent variables were age, education, number of sexual partners, sexual behavior, intention, attitude, perceived behavior control, and subjective norm. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by path analysis.Results: STI was directly increased by unsafe sexual behavior (b= 2.03; 95% CI= 1.15 to 2.91; p<0.001), older age (b= 1.83; 95% CI= 0.58 to 3.09; p= 0.004), multiple sexual partners (b= 2.28; 95% CI= 1.33 to 3.23; p<0.001). It was indirectly affected by intention, attitude, perceived behavior control, subjective norm, and education.Conclusion: STI is directly increased by sexual behavior, age, multiple sexual partners. It is indirectly affected by intention, attitude, perceived behavior control, subjective norm, and education.Keywords: sexually transmitted infections, sexual behavior, men who have sex with menCorrespondence: Siti Nurhalimah. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret. Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java, Indonesia. Email: halimah1006.mdf@gmail.com. Mobile: 082233890866. Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(3): 199-211https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.03.07
Do Schools Affect Unsafe Sexual Behaviors among High School Students in Boyolali, Central Java? A Multilevel Analysis Approach Susanto, Bela Novita Amaris; Nurhaeni, Ismi Dwi Astuti
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior Vol 3, No 4 (2018)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Abstract

Background: Premarital sexual behavior is a multidimensional problem, which is influenced by various factors, one of them in school. The majority of adolescents engage in risky sexual behavior the first time when they are in high school, namely at the age of 15-18 years. The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of schools on unsafe sexual behavior in high school students in Boyolali, Central Java.Subjects and Method: This was an across-sectional study conducted in senior high schools in Boyolali, Central Java, from October to November 2018. A total of 200 students was selected by cluster random sampling. The dependent variable was unsafe sexual behavior. The independent variables were knowledge, attitude, self-efficacy, understanding of the region, parental supervision, access to information, and subjective norm. The data were collected using questionnaire and data were analyzed using multilevel logistic regression.Results: Premarital sexual behavior decreased with high knowledge (b= -3.33; 95% CI= -5.88 to - 0.79; p= 0.010), positive attitude (b= -5.16; 95% CI= -8.63 to -1.70; p= 0.004), strong self-efficacy (b = -4.65; 95% CI = -7.37 to -1.94; p = 0.001), good understanding of religion (b= -3.95; 95% CI = -6.82 to -1.10; p= 0.007), strict parental supervision (b= -3.70; 95% CI= -6.60 to -0.80; p= 0.012), good access to information (b = -3.61; 95% CI = -6.10 to -1.12; p = 0.004), and subjective norm (b = -2.43; 95% CI= -4.60 to -0.25; p= 0.029). Schools had negligible contextual effect on premarital sexual behavior with ICC <0.1%.Conclusion: Premarital sexual behavior decreases with high knowledge, positive attitude, strong self-efficacy, a good understanding of religion, strict parental supervision, high exposure to information access, and subjective norm. Schools have a negligible contextual effect on premarital sexual behavior.Keywords: unsafe sexual behavior, senior high school, multilevel analysisCorrespondence: Bela Novita Amaris Susanto. Masters Program in Public Health. Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami No.36 A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: bnamaris@gmail.com. Mobile: +6285788844440.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 4(2): 230-239https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.04.02
Application of Health Belief Model on Preventive Behaviors of Patients with Low Back Pain Sari, Septi Ayu Arum Yuspita; Indarto, Dono; Wijaya, Mahendra
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior Vol 3, No 3 (2018)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Abstract

Background: Low back pain (LBP) has different negative impacts in some people around the world. There are many risk factors of LBP, either biology, psychology, or social economics. A psychological theory (Health Belief Model/HBM) can be applied for preventive behaviors of some human diseases. This study aimed to analyze the application of HBM on preventive behaviors of patients with LBP.Subjects and Method: This was a case-control study conducted at the medical rehabilitation policlinic, Dr. Moewardi Hospital, Surakarta, from October to November 2018. A sample of 50 LBP patients and 100 non-LBP patients was selected by fixed exposure sampling. The dependent variable was preventive behaviors. The independent variables were perceived severity, susceptibility, benefit, barrier, threat, cues to action, and self-efficacy. Data on LBP was obtained from medical record. The other data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by path analysis.Results: LBP preventive behaviors were directly and positively associated with perceived threat (b= 0.46; 95% CI= 0.24 to 0.68; p<0.001), perceived benefit (b= 0.29; 95% CI= 0.18 to 0.40; p<0.001), and self-efficacy (b= 0.16; 95% CI= 0.08 to 0.23; p<0.001). It was indirectly associated with perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived barrier, and cues to action.Conclusion: LBP preventive behaviors are directly and positively associated with perceived threat, perceived benefit, and self-efficacy. It is indirectly associated with perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, perceived barrier, and cues to action. This study supports the application of HBM to explain LBP preventive behaviors.Keywords: low back pain, Health Belief Model, path analysisCorrespondence: Septi Ayu Arum Yuspita Sari. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret. Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email:yuspitasari020993@gmail.com. Mobile: +6282338986991.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(3): 192-198https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.03.06
Biopsychosocial Determinants of Human Papilloma Virus Immunization in Women of Reproductive Age in Surakarta, Central Java Febriani, Gabriela Advitri; Rahardjo, Setyo Sri; Murti, Bhisma
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior Vol 3, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Background: Cervical cancer ranks second as the cause of death in women worldwide. Cervical cancer is preventable by Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) immunization. It was hypothesized that use of HPV immunization is determined by biopsychosocial factors as involved in the Health Belief Model and Social Learning Theory. This study aimed to analyze the determinants of HPV immunization use in women of reproductive age.Subjects and Method: This was an analytic observational study with a cross-sectional design. The study was conducted at Permata Harapan Clinic and Budi Sehat Laboratory Clinic, Surakarta, Central Java. The data were collected from February to March 2018. A sample of 200 women was selected by random sampling, consisting of 50 women undertaking screening and 150 women not undertaking screening. The dependent variable was HPV immunization. The independent variables were perceptions of susceptibility, seriousness, benefit, barrier, respectively, and self-efficacy, education, family income, employment status, family support, social environment, and cervical cancer screening. Data on HPV vaccine use were taken from medical record. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by path analysis.Results: Use of HPV immunization was directly associated with perceived susceptibility (b= 2.01; 95% CI= 1.03 to 3.00; p<0.001), perceived seriousness (b= 1.52; 95% CI 95%= -0.08 to 3.13; p=0.063), self efficacy (b= 1.55; 95% CI= 0.05 to 3.05; p=0.043), and perceived barrier (b= -2.25; 95% CI= -3.22 to -1.28; p<0.001). It was indirectly associated with perceived benefit, education, family income, employment status, family support, social environment, and cervical cancer screening.Conclusion: Use of HPV immunization is directly associated with perceived susceptibility, perceived seriousness, self-efficacy, and perceived barrier. It is indirectly associated with perceived benefit, education, family income, employment status, family support, social environment, and cervical cancer screening. Keywords: Human Papilloma Virus, immunization, women of reproductive age, health belief model, social learning theoryCorrespondence:Gabriela Advitri Febriani. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, Surakarta, Indonesia. Email: gabrielaadvitri8@gmail.com. Mobile: +6285743809055.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(1): 66-77https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.01.07
The Representation of Social, Economic, Psychological, and Reproductive Health Condition of the Commercial Sex Workers Post-closing of the Dolly Complex in Surabaya Puspitaningtyas, Danty Indra; Demartoto, Argyo; Murti, Bhisma
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior Vol 2, No 1 (2017)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Abstract

Background: Dolly was the biggest red light district in Southeast Asia with more than 1000 (a thousand) women working as commercial sex workers. Because the district imposed a very negative effect  to the surrounding inhabitants especially to children, therefore red light district area of  Dolly and Jarak which are located in  residential area had to be closed. The quality of life of the residents especially the commercial sex workers was very much affected after the district was closed.  The study aimed to understand the representation of the social, economic, psychological, and reproductive health condition after the Dolly district in Surabaya was closed.Subject and Method: This was a qualitative descriptive study with phenomenology approach. This study was  conducted in former red light districts of Dolly and Jarak in Surabaya from January 18-February 28, 2017. The informant of this study were commercial sex workers, former commercial sex workers, head of hamlet (RW), former pander of Dolly,  Head of Civil Society Organization, healthcare workers, and Social Office of Surabaya City. The sampling technique used was snowball sampling, with in-depth interviews, observation, documentation study. The data were analyzed by interactive analysis model including data collection, data reduction, display and verification. Results: The commercial sex workers characteristic prior and post closing of the district were around 28-43 years old, with elementary – senior high school educated. Most of the commercial sex workers were from outside the city with 1-5 customers/day. They charged Rp. 100-300 thousand (Dolly’s commercial sex workers) per customer and Rp. 100-200 thousand/customer (Jarak’s commercial sex workers). The representation of quality of life post-closing was poor, altered social condition,  lack of interaction with others, the degradation of economic condition, poor psychological condition due to the economical problem, and reproductive health was less protected  because they did not get  regular examination like before the complex was closed.Conclusion: The representation  of quality of life in terms of the condition of social, economic, psychology, and reproductive health of the commercial sex workers post Dolly and Jarak closing were poor. Therefore, government intervention was very much needed to help improving the quality of life of the commercial sex workers.Keywords: Commercial sex workers, social, economic, psychological, reproductive health.Correspondence: Danty Indra Puspitaningtyas. Masters Program of Public Health, Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta. Email: dantyindra@yahoo.com. Mobile:  +6285732850663Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2017), 2(1): 77-87https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2017.02.01.07
Effect of Health Education on Health Behavior in Patients with Hypertension Haryani, Nur; Subiyanto, AA.; Suryani, Nunuk
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior Vol 1, No 1 (2016)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Abstract

Background: Hypertension is a disease that can lead to stroke, heart attack, heart failure that can lead to death. Someone who has a risk factor for hypertension must be more vigilant and earlier in conducting prevention efforts. Prevention is to control the blood and improve the understanding of hypertension through health education in order to identify and reduce risk behavior hypertension. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect health education program 0n health behavior in patients with hypertension.Subjects and Method: This was a quasi-experimental study with pretest-posttest and control design. This conducted in Purwo Bakti Husodo, Purwodiningratan and Mojosongo integrated development post Pos Pembinaan Terpadu (Posbindu). A total sample of patients with hypertension as many as 30 people the treatment group and 32 control group. Data analysis using paired sample t-test or Wilcoxon and using independent sample t-test or Mann Whitney.Results: No effect of hypertension health education to the knowledge of hypertension (p<0.001). There is an effect on the attitudes of health education hypertension patients with hypertension (p=0.014). Health education hypertension influence the change risky behavior is a history of smoking (p=0.005), eating salty foods (p=0.008) and frequency of exercise (p  0.001), while health education hypertension had no effect statistically significant to change risky behavior that is stress (p=0.322) and BMI (p=0.502).Conclusion: Health education about hypertension effect on knowledge, attitudes, smoking, eating salty foods and exercise while no effect on stress and Body Mass Index (BMI).Keywords: health education, knowledge, attitudes and behavior of hypertension risk.Correspondence: Nur Haryani. School of Public Health, Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2016), 1 (1): 9-18https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2016.01.01.02

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