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International Journal of Renewable Energy Development
Published by Universitas Diponegoro
ISSN : 22524940     EISSN : -     DOI : -
Core Subject : Science,
The scope of journal encompasses: Photovoltaic technology, Solar thermal applications, Biomass, Wind energy technology, Material science and technology, Low energy Architecture, Geothermal energy, Wave and Tidal energy, Hydro power, Hydrogen Production Technology, Energy Policy, Socio-economic on energy, Energy efficiency and management The journal was first introduced in February 2012 and regularly published online three times a year (February, July, October).
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Articles 244 Documents
List of Content Editorial, IJRED
International Journal of Renewable Energy Development Vol 2, No 1 (2013): February 2013
Publisher : Center of Biomass & Renewable Energy, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Diponegoro University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (386.93 KB)

Abstract

CONTENTS OF ARTICLES PAGEPassive Design of Buildings for Extreme Weather EnvironmentS.N. Al-Zubaidy, S. Tokbolat, R. Tokpatayeva1-11 Economic Impact of CDM Implementation through Alternate Energy Resource SubstitutionK.J. Sreekanth, S. Jayaraj, N. Sudarsan13-18 Implications of Charcoal Briquette Produced by Local Communities on Livelihoods and Environment in Nairobi KenyaMary Njenga, A Yonemitsu, N Karanjaa, M Iiyama, J Kithinji, M Dubbeling C Sundberge, R R Jamnadass19-29 A Novel Design of Multi-Chambered Biomass BatteryK. Sudhakar, R. Ananthakrishnan, A. Goyal, H.K. Darji31-34 Power Quality Improvement Wind Energy System Using Cascaded Multilevel InverterJ.S. Sathiyanarayanan, A. S. Kumar35-43 Solar PV Lighting and Studying after Sunset: Analysis of Micro-benefits in Off-grid Rural GhanaGeorge Y. Obeng45-51 Innovative Green Technology for Sustainable Industrial Estate DevelopmentR. Hadiwijoyo, P Purwanto, Sudharto P Hadi53-58 Empowering Distributed Solar PV Energy For Malaysian Rural Housing: Towards Energy Security And Equitability Of Rural CommunitiesN.A. Ahmad, H. Byrd59-68
Passive Design of Buildings for Extreme Weather Environment Al-Zubaidy, S.N.; Tokbolat, S.; Tokpatayeva, R.
International Journal of Renewable Energy Development Vol 2, No 1 (2013): February 2013
Publisher : Center of Biomass & Renewable Energy, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Diponegoro University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1405.009 KB) | DOI: 10.14710/ijred.2.1.1-11

Abstract

Buildings account for nearly 40% of the end-use energy consumption and carbonemissions globally. Buildings, once built, are used at least for several decades. The building sectortherefore holds a significant responsibility for implementing strategies to increase energyefficiency and reduce carbon emissions and thus contribute to global efforts directed towardmitigating the adverse effects of climate change. The work presented in this paper is a part ofcontinuing efforts to identify, analyze and promote the design of low energy, sustainable buildingswith special reference to the Kazakhstan locality. Demonstration of improved environmentalconditions and impact on energy savings will be outlined through a case study incorporating apassive design approach and detailed computational fluid dynamics analysis for an existingbuilding complex. The influence of orientation and configuration is discussed with reference toenergy efficiency and associated wind comfort and safety. The effect of these aspects on energyconsumption and comfortable wind environment has been assessed using CFD analysis and provedto be affective. Single building and multiple building configurations have been analyzed andcompared. According to the findings, multiple building configurations have better wind conditionswhen compared with a single standing building. With respect to orientation the former one shouldbe modeled with the fully surrounded side of a “box” opposite to the predominant wind directionwhereas the latter one should be located with the rear side opposite to the wind direction. Thus,results indicated that there is a considerable influence of passive design and orientation on energyefficiency, wind comfort and safety. Careful consideration and application of the findings canpotentially lead to considerable decrease of energy consumption and, therefore, allow savingmoney and the environment at the same time.
Economic Impact of CDM Implementation through Alternate Energy Resource Substitution Sreekanth, K.J.; Jayaraj, S.; Sudarsan, N.
International Journal of Renewable Energy Development Vol 2, No 1 (2013): February 2013
Publisher : Center of Biomass & Renewable Energy, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Diponegoro University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (781.725 KB) | DOI: 10.14710/ijred.2.1.13-18

Abstract

Since the Kyoto protocol agreement, Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) hasgarnered large emphasis in terms of certified emission reductions (CER) not only amidst the globalcarbon market but also in India. This paper attempts to assess the impact of CDM towardssustainable development particularly in rural domestic utility sector that mainly includes lightingand cooking applications, with electricity as the source of energy. A detailed survey has undertakenin the state of Kerala, in southern part of India to study the rural domestic energy consumptionpattern. The data collected was analyzed that throws insight into the interrelationships of thevarious parameters that influence domestic utility sector pertaining to energy consumption byusing electricity as the source of energy. The interrelationships between the different parameterswere modeled that optimizes the contribution of electricity on domestic utility sector. The resultswere used to estimate the feasible extent of CO2 emission reduction through use of electricity as theenergy resources, vis-à-vis its economic viability through cost effectiveness. The analysis alsoprovides a platform for implementing CDM projects in the sector and related prospects withrespects to the Indian scenario.
Implications of Charcoal Briquette Produced by Local Communities on Livelihoods and Environment in Nairobi- Kenya Njenga, M.; Yonemitsu, A.; Karanja, N.; Iiyama, M.; Kithinji, J.; Dubbeling, M.; Sundberg, C.; Jamnadass, R.
International Journal of Renewable Energy Development Vol 2, No 1 (2013): February 2013
Publisher : Center of Biomass & Renewable Energy, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Diponegoro University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (937.847 KB) | DOI: 10.14710/ijred.2.1.19-29

Abstract

The residents of Nairobi, Kenya, use 700 tonnes of charcoal per day, producing about88 tonnes of charcoal dust that is found in most of the charcoal retailing stalls that is disposed of inwater drainage systems or in black garbage heaps. The high costs of cooking fuel results in poorhouseholds using unhealthy materials such as plastic waste. Further, poor households are opting tocook foods that take a short time to prepare irrespective of their nutritional value. This articlepresents experiences with community self-help groups producing charcoal fuel briquettes fromcharcoal dust in poorer nieghbourhoods of Nairobi for home use and sale. Households thatproduced charcoal fuel briquettes for own use and those that bought them saved 70% and 30% ofmoney spent on cooking energy respectively. The charcoal fuel briquettes have been found to beenvironmentally beneficial since they produce less smoke and increase total cooking energy bymore than 15%, thereby saving an equivalent volume of trees that would be cut down for charcoal.Charcoal briquette production is a viable opportunity for good quality and affordable cooking fuel.Bioenergy and waste management initiatives should promote recovery of organic by-products forcharcoal briquette production.
A Novel Design of Multi-Chambered Biomass Battery Sudhakar, K.; Ananthakrishnan, R.; Goyal, A.; Darji, H.K.
International Journal of Renewable Energy Development Vol 2, No 1 (2013): February 2013
Publisher : Center of Biomass & Renewable Energy, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Diponegoro University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (736.894 KB) | DOI: 10.14710/ijred.2.1.31-34

Abstract

In this paper, a novel design of biomass battery has been introduced for providingelectricity to meet the lighting requirements of rural household using biomass. A biomass battery isdesigned, developed and tested using cow dung as the raw material. This is done via anaerobicdigestion of the cow dung, and power generation driven by the ions produced henceforth. Thevoltage and power output is estimated for the proposed system. It is for the first time that such ahigh voltage is obtained from cow dung fed biomass battery. The output characteristics of thisnovel battery design have also been compared with the previously designed battery.
Power Quality Improvement Wind Energy System Using Cascaded Multilevel Inverter Sathiyanarayanan, J.S.; Kumar, A. S.
International Journal of Renewable Energy Development Vol 2, No 1 (2013): February 2013
Publisher : Center of Biomass & Renewable Energy, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Diponegoro University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1956.158 KB) | DOI: 10.14710/ijred.2.1.35-43

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In this paper, a wind energy conversion system based on a cascaded H-bridgemultilevel inverter (CHBMLI) topology has been proposed to be used for the grid interface of largesplit winding alternators (SWAs). A new method has been suggested for the generation of referencecurrents for the voltage source inverter (VSI) depending upon the available wind power. TheCHBMLI has been used as a VSI and operated in a current control mode order to achieve theobjectives of real power injection and load compensation (power factor correction, load balancing,and harmonic compensation) based on the proposed reference generation scheme. In the fieldexcitation control of SWA provides a single means vary the dc link voltages of all the CHBssimultaneously and proportionately.
Solar PV Lighting and Studying after Sunset: Analysis of Micro-benefits in Off-grid Rural Ghana Obeng, G.Y.
International Journal of Renewable Energy Development Vol 2, No 1 (2013): February 2013
Publisher : Center of Biomass & Renewable Energy, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Diponegoro University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (909.726 KB) | DOI: 10.14710/ijred.2.1.45-51

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Solar PV light provides school children living in off-grid rural communities theopportunity to have clean and bright lighting to study after sunset. On the contrary, lightingprovided from poor sources can pollute and adversely affect human eyes during reading andwriting. Using indicator-based questionnaires in cross-sectional surveys, households with andwithout solar PV lighting were surveyed in off-grid rural communities in Ghana. The studyinvestigated lighting and children’s studies after sunset. The results indicated that whereassolar PV light of 5-20 watts dc lamps was sufficient for 5-6 children to study together, lightingfrom kerosene lantern could be sufficient for 1-3 children. All things being equal, the resultsshowed that children who use solar PV light to study upto 2 hours after sunset are likely toimprove on their examination results. The extent to which solar PV lighting significantlyimpacts on studying after sunset was established using some identified indicators. Knowledgeof the results provides understanding of the relative constraints in lighting services faced bychildren in rural communities without access to quality lighting. Such micro-level data willhelp to enhance policy and planning efforts to increase access to clean and renewable energybasedlighting devices to achieve efficient visual comfort in off-grid rural communities.
Innovative Green Technology for Sustainable Industrial Estate Development Hadiwijoyo, R.; Purwanto, P.; Hadi, Sudharto P.
International Journal of Renewable Energy Development Vol 2, No 1 (2013): February 2013
Publisher : Center of Biomass & Renewable Energy, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Diponegoro University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (599.763 KB) | DOI: 10.14710/ijred.2.1.53-58

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Sustainable industrial development requires a balance between economic growth,equity and environment. Two major components of industrial development are energy and rawmaterials. To minimize the environmental impacts of energy and raw materials, important stepsare required to deal with the green economy and global warming issues. The use of innovationtechnology to industrial gas emission is a preventive solution facing global warming. A research hasbeen done in Industrial Estate in Cilegon (IEC) Banten province, Indonesia, to see how to reduceenergy demand and encourage uses of more environmentally-friendly energy in the estate. Fossilenergy needs in the industrial estate were analyzed to see the opportunities of energy saving andrenewable energy development. The target to be achieved is to reduce the greenhouse gasemissions and improve the energy efficiency in the industrial park.
Empowering Distributed Solar PV Energy for Malaysian Rural Housing: Towards Energy Security and Equitability of Rural Communities Ahmad, N.A.; Byrd, H.
International Journal of Renewable Energy Development Vol 2, No 1 (2013): February 2013
Publisher : Center of Biomass & Renewable Energy, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Diponegoro University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1188.541 KB) | DOI: 10.14710/ijred.2.1.59-68

Abstract

This paper illustrates on how Malaysia’s development landscapes has been poweredby cheap oil and gas making it dependent and addicted on using large amounts of fossil fuels. As acountry that is primarily depended on fossil fuels for generating power supply, Malaysia needs tocogitate of long-term energy security due to fossil fuel depletion and peak oil issues. Loss of theseresources could leadto thereduction of power generation capacitywhich will threaten the stabilityof the electricity supply in Malaysia. This could potentially influence in an increase in electricitycosts which lead to a phase of power scarcity and load shedding for the country. With the risk ofinterrupted power supplies, rural households, especially those of low-income groups areparticularly vulnerable to the post-effects of a power outage and an inequitable distribution to thepeople. Distributed generation of electricity by solar PVs diminishes the vulnerability of thesehouseholds and can also offer an income to them by feeding the power supply to the national gridthrough Feed-in Tariff scheme. At the moment, the deployment of solar PV installations is still inthe introductory stage in Malaysia, where roof-mounted PV panels are only available to commercialand urban residential buildings. This is due to the lack of a suitable renewable energy policy forrural households and the high cost of the solar PV technology. This paper will put forward ananalysis for incorporating solar photovoltaic on roofs of rural houses by identifying the energyconsumption of these households and the extent to which PVs can alleviate electricity insecurity.The results present significant potential for distributed PV power generation in rural areas inMalaysia which shown a considerable amount of electricity needed to be harvested from roofmountedsolar PV for rural people in Malaysia.
Editorial Page IJRED, Editorial
International Journal of Renewable Energy Development Vol 1, No 1 (2012): February 2012
Publisher : Center of Biomass & Renewable Energy, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Diponegoro University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (186.533 KB)

Abstract

EDITOR IN CHIEFDR. HADIYANTO Center of Biomass and Renewable Energy (C-BIORE)Diponegoro University, IndonesiaE-mail : hady.hadiyanto@gmail.comDR. P.V. ARAVIND Process and Energy Section, Technical University (TU)Delft, NetherlandsE-mail : p.v.aravind@tudelft.nl EDITORIAL BOARDProf. Harwin Saptoadi, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering,Gadjah Mada University, Indonesia(Assoc. Prof.) Dr Henri Spanjer, Sanitary Engineering, Technical University Delft,NetherlandsDr. Nuki Agya Utama, Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University JapanProf.Dr Electo Eduardo Silva Lora, Federal University of Itajubá, BrazilDr. Konrad Blum, Universität Oldenburg, GermanyDr. Mohd. Amran Moh Radzi, University Putra MalaysiaDr. Misri Gozan, University of IndonesiaDr Widayat, Chemical Engineering Diponegoro University, Indonesia TECHNICAL SUPPORTDessy Ariyanti, Chemical Engineering Department, Diponegoro University,IndonesiaNoera Handayani, Chemical Engineering Department, Diponegoro University,Indonesia

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