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Contact Name
Aan J. Wahyudi
Contact Email
aanj001@lipi.go.id
Phone
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mri@mail.lipi.go.id
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Location
Kota adm. jakarta selatan,
Dki jakarta
INDONESIA
Marine Research in Indonesia
ISSN : 02162873     EISSN : 24432008     DOI : -
MARINE RESEARCH IN INDONESIA (MRI) has been published since 1956 by Indonesia's oldest marine research institute, the Research Center for Oceanography of LIPI (Indonesian Institute of Sciences). MRI focuses on physical, chemical, biological, geological oceanographic as well as coastal management studies in the Indonesian seas and the adjacent Indo-Pacific region.
Articles 312 Documents
THE DISTRIBUTION OF BENTHIC FORAMINIFERA IN DAMAR ISLAND AND JUKUNG ISLAND, SERIBU ISLANDS Natsir, Suhartati M.
Marine Research in Indonesia Vol 35 No 2 (2010)
Publisher : Research Center for Oceanography - Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (6939.492 KB) | DOI: 10.14203/mri.v35i1.10

Abstract

Seribu Islands are archipelago within Jakarta Bay built upon the pleistocene coral formation of the Sunda Shelf. The islands are characterized by unique and high biodiversity such as coral reefs. Since coral reef degradation would lead to a decrease of human prosperity, the determination of the coral reef quality is of high importance. Foraminifera offers an early warning system for the coral reef condition, as exemplified by the FORAM Index, i.e. Foraminifera in Reef Assessment and Monitoring Index. This study compared the foraminiferal community structure and the FORAM Index of two islands between the Damar Besar and Jukung. Both islands were dominated by symbiont-bearing foraminifera of the genera Amphistegina, Calcarina, Heterostegina, Marginophora, and Operculina. However, the number of benthic foraminifers at Jukung Island was higher than that at Damar Besar Island, having 17 individuals per species on average. Jukung Island was a conducive site to reef growth, as indicated by a FORAM Index (between 6,48 and 6,57), and Damar Besar Island was liable to environmental change.
EARTH SYSTEM PROCESSES OF THE WALLACEA AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS TO THE INDONESIAN THROUGHFLOW AND BIOGEOGRAPHY Sopaheluwakan, Jan
Marine Research in Indonesia Vol 36 No 1 (2011)
Publisher : Research Center for Oceanography - Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (27780.111 KB) | DOI: 10.14203/mri.v36i1.526

Abstract

The Wallacea with the total land area of 347,000 km designates a biogeographical group of Eastern Indonesian islands separated by deep water straits from the Asian and Australian continental shelves, and occupies a region with the world's most complex geological evolution and the accompanying extreme endemism. It also encloses remnants of emerged and submerged lands as well as dispersed and accreted island arcs and fragments of the continents resulting from a relatively continuous Cenozoic convergence of the Indo-Australian, Eurasia and Pacific-Philippine Sea plates. This paper discusses the Cenozoic spatial and temporal evolution of terranes in the region and explores how the Earth System Processes have eventually shaped up the Indonesian Throughflow and highlights the biogeographically unique and rich Wallacea. It will be demonstrated that the Wallace's line may have inherited an evolved multi-origin Early Cenozoic deep water barrier and the present Wallacea has been the resultant of significant Neogene convergent tectonics and significant modification by glacially-related sea level and climatic changes during the Quaternary. The gradual and systematic changes of the respective ocean regimes, the corresponding oceanometeorologic evolution, the emergence and disappearance of islands and land bridges, the dispersal and docking of some terranes have all resulted in the present configuration of the areas of endemism within the Wallacea. These changes correspond with the Neogene closure of the Indonesian Seaways, a narrow passage formed by the collision of the three major plates and the vanished pre-Cenozoic Tethyan ocean formed by the otherwise connected Indian and Pacific Oceans.
TIDAL REGIMS OF ARAFURA AND TIMOR SEA Pranowo, Widodo S.; Wirasantosa, Sugiarta
Marine Research in Indonesia Vol 36 No 1 (2011)
Publisher : Research Center for Oceanography - Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (10741.66 KB) | DOI: 10.14203/mri.v36i1.525

Abstract

Tidal range in the Arafura and Teimor Sea region is estimated from the actual field records collected by five tidal stations during March 2011. These stations include Rote and Saumlaki tidal stations of Badan Koordinasi Survei dan Pemetaan Nasional (Bakosurtanal) Indonesia, and Broome, Darwin and Groote Eylandt tidal stations of Australia Bureau of Meteorology (BoM). In addition to data from these stations, datasets of sea surface height obtained from Topex/Poseidon altimetry at seven (7) virtual stations were used. Generally, the results of this study are in agreement with that of Wyrtki (1961). However, by utilizing spectral analysis and form factor, this study shows difference in terms of tidal types from that of Wyrtki's, particularly at Karumba and Groote Eylandt stations.
SPIDER CRABS OF THE GENERA PARATYMOLUS MIERS, 1879 AND LITOSUS LOH & NG, 1999 FROM LOMBOK ISLAND, INDONESIA (CRUSTACEA, DECAPODA, BRACHYURA, MAJOIDEA, INACHIDAE) Rahayu, Dwi Listyo
Marine Research in Indonesia Vol 36 No 1 (2011)
Publisher : Research Center for Oceanography - Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (7453.52 KB) | DOI: 10.14203/mri.v36i1.522

Abstract

A small collection of majoid spider crabs of the genus Paratymolus Miers, 1879, s.l from Lombok Island, Indonesia contains four species namely P. hastatus Alcock (1895), P. coccus Loh & Ng (1999), P. cygnus Loh & Ng (1999), and Litosus sexspinosus (Miers, 1884). Except for L. spinosus, the three other species are new records for Indonesia. Paratymolus coccus is previously known from only female specimens, and the presence of male specimens in the collection studied provides the opportunity to complete the description of male characters. Paratymolus hastatus is reported for the first time outside Indian Ocean and P. cygnus is recorded for the first time after its description.
FIRST RECORD ON ODONTANTHIAS FLAGRIS YOSHINO AND ARAGA, 1975 (PERCIFORMES: SERRANIDAE) IN INDONESIAN WATERS Peristiwady, Teguh
Marine Research in Indonesia Vol 36 No 1 (2011)
Publisher : Research Center for Oceanography - Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (10854.143 KB) | DOI: 10.14203/mri.v36i1.523

Abstract

Two specimens of Odontanthias flagris have been caught from Bitung, North Sulawesi in June 2010. Previously, nown locations of this species are Okinawa and Nishino-shima, Japan. O. flagris is very similar with O. rhodopeplus. They shares following characters: dorsal fin rays X, 13; anal fin rays III, 7; pectorals fin rays 17-18; scales above lateral line 7; scales below lateral line 19 and gill rakers on lower limb 28. Characters differing O. flagris from O. rhodopeplus, O. chrysostictus and other six species appear in the percentage of orbit diameter. In addition, O. flagris has shorter pelvic fin rays but longer caudal peduncle and third dorsal fin spine. Its morphological features, distribution, remarks and photo of species are given in this paper.
ABUNDANCE AND DIVERSITY OF ZOOPLANKTON IN LEMBEH STRAIT, BITUNG, INDONESIA Rumengan, Inneke F.M.; Akerina, J.; Rampengan, M. M.F.; Masengi, K. W.A.
Marine Research in Indonesia Vol 36 No 1 (2011)
Publisher : Research Center for Oceanography - Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (9206.447 KB) | DOI: 10.14203/mri.v36i1.524

Abstract

This study examined the diversity and abundance of zooplankton in Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi. Plankton were sampled monthly from September 2004 to February 2005, collected at four stations using a plankton net of 300 pm meshsize with vertical tow of 10 m water column from the bottom. Environmental factors i.e pH, salinity, current velocity, and dissolved oxygen (DO) were measured in situ at the time of plankton sampling. In general, the environmental conditions of Lembeh Strait were in optimal range for zooplankton. There was a similar pattern in the abundance of zooplankton among stations. Crustacea (mainly Copepoda) was the dominant genera among stations, followed by Ciliata and Tunicata. In all stations, the most abundance taxa (72.3%) was Crustacea (21 genera), mainly copepod (18 genera). There were 7 other classes of holoplankton: Ciliata (2 genera), Rhisopoda (1 genus), Hidrozoa (1 genus), Polychaeta (2 genera), Sagitoedea (1 genus) and Tunicata (2 genera). Meroplankton (larva) were only represented by 5 genera. The most common genera were calanoid copepods, such as Calanus spp., Undinula spp., Eucalanus spp., Rhincalanus spp., Paracalanus spp., and Acartia spp. Diversity, evenness and dominance indices showed that Serena Island, a relatively uncontaminated area, was more productive than the other three stations which were considered as relatively contaminated area with anthrophogenic sources.
A PRELIMINARY STUDY ON THE RESPONSE OF AMPHIPHOD GRANDIDIERELLA SP. TO CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT OF JAKARTA BAY Hindarti, Dwi; Puspitasari, Rachma; Arifin, Zainal
Marine Research in Indonesia Vol 35 No 2 (2010)
Publisher : Research Center for Oceanography - Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (9313.793 KB) | DOI: 10.14203/mri.v35i2.475

Abstract

A preliminary study on the response of amphipod exposed to contaminated sediments of Jakarta Bay was carried out in October 2009. The objective of the study was to determine the mortality rate of amphipod in response to exposure of contaminated sediments. Seven sediment samples were taken from the bay, i.e, reference site (St. A), and six-contaminated sites (St. B3, B5, C3, C5, D3, and D5). Amphipod (Grandidierella sp.) was collected from reference site. The study showed that average of mortality rate of amphipod ranged between 50.0 and 76.3% at contaminated sediments and 38.3% at reference sediments. There was significant difference on mortality rate of amphipod exposed to sediments of reference site and that of contaminated sites. The mortality of Grandidierella sp. was not strongly correlated with the concentration of Pb and Cu in contaminated sediments. The critical mortality factor of amphipod in this study might be due to variation in grain size of sediments and short period of acclimatization.
PERFORMANCE OF GILLNET-MESH SIZE SELECTIVITY FOR THREE FLYINGFISH SPECIES IN AMBON WATERS, MOLUCCAS PROVINCE Hutubessy, Barbara Grace; Syahilatua, Augy
Marine Research in Indonesia Vol 35 No 2 (2010)
Publisher : Research Center for Oceanography - Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (8369.028 KB) | DOI: 10.14203/mri.v35i2.476

Abstract

The gillnets' performance for capturing flying fish was obtained from the selectivity parameters of each mesh size. Gillnet selectivity parameters for flying fish were estimated using multi-panel drift gillnets with four different mesh sizes in southern Ambon Island. The black-spot flying fish Cheilopogon suttoni reached peak selectivity at 20.34 cm for mesh size of 1.25", 24.37 cm (1.5") and 28.47 cm (1.75"). Peak selectivity occurred at 22.16 cm for the 1,25" mesh size in the yellow-spot flying fish Cheilopogon abei, with the maximum size selectivity at 31.61cm for the 1.75" mesh. The optimum size for the black-plain flying fish Hirundichthys oxycephalus was 18.67 cm for the 1.25" mesh size, and 22.37 cm for 1.50" mesh size. Selectivity was highest at 26.12 cm for the 1.75" mesh size. Gillnet used in this study was constructed specifically for targeting flying fish suggesting that information on mesh selectivity examined here should has direct applicability to local flying fish fishery.
EIGHTEEN SEA CUCUMBER SPECIES FISHED IN KARIMUNJAWA ISLANDS, JAVA SEA Purwati, Pradina; Hartati, Retno; Widianingsih, -
Marine Research in Indonesia Vol 35 No 2 (2010)
Publisher : Research Center for Oceanography - Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (8966.056 KB) | DOI: 10.14203/mri.v35i2.474

Abstract

Indonesia has been supplying the highest diversity of dried sea cucumbers (trepang) to world markets for decades even though species validation on the trepang from any producing areas throughout the country is still needed. Karimunjawa (Islands off north coast of Java) is one of trepang habitats. Several visits from May to November 2009 had been made to collect trepang from the fishers and collectors in that area. Eighteen aspidochirote species were identified, more varied than those reported in 1988 and 1992 although 7 species have no longer been found. Three species among those: Actinopyga banwarthi, Bohadschia subrubra, and Holothuria fuscocinerea have never been reported in Indonesia before, neither on the list of commercial sea cucumbers in Asia nor world trade provided by Choo (2008) and Toral-Grande (2007). These species composition shifts may indicate a threat to species diversity, starting with excessive removal of natural stock. Up to now, 28 species of trepang have been recognized from Karimunjawa waters.
ONGROWING TECHNIQUES FOR JUVENILE DONKEY EAR ABALONE (HALIOTIS ASINIA) AT PEMENANG WATERS, NORTH LOMBOK, INDONESIA Setyono, Dwi Eny Djoko; Aswandy, Indra
Marine Research in Indonesia Vol 35 No 2 (2010)
Publisher : Research Center for Oceanography - Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (9809.766 KB) | DOI: 10.14203/mri.v35i2.473

Abstract

Abalone is one of the most prized sea delicacies in the world. In Indonesia, although donkey ear abalone (Haliotis asinina) forms a valuable fishery, little is known about its culture techniques. A study has been conducted to find out the most suitable technique for ongrowing donkey ear abalone, for to the local farmer in Indonesia. Juveniles used in study were collected from the southern Lombok coastal waters. They were reared in different type of structure (CNC = circular net cage and TNC = tyre net cage) and set at different depths. Juveniles were fed ad-libitum by macroalgae, Gracilaria spp. Results of the study showed that juveniles of donkey ear abalone have a better growth when cultured offshore in a TNC than in CNC. To gain a better growth, juveniles abalone need to be reared in cages which provided more shelter and less light. Donkey ear abalone was considered a hardy species, survival rate was not influenced by the type of structure (CNC or TNC) and setting position (depths).

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