cover
Contact Name
-
Contact Email
-
Phone
-
Journal Mail Official
-
Editorial Address
-
Location
Kab. sleman,
Daerah istimewa yogyakarta
INDONESIA
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies
ISSN : 25806580     EISSN : 25979817     DOI : -
Core Subject : Economy, Education,
The Journal strives to provide new, rigorous and comprehensive knowledge and understanding of Southeast Asia through inter-disciplinary perspectives. Its scopes includes but is not limited to economic welfare, institutional knowledge production, history, political transformations and the social development of information and communication technology in the region. Contributors may focus on an in-depth individual country analysis or on comparing a multi-country case study. Given the mission statement of CESASS, contributors are encouraged to submit empirical, methodological, theoretical, or conceptual articles about Southeast Asia through the eye of social sciences.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 8 Documents
Search results for , issue " Vol 1, No 1 (2017): July" : 8 Documents clear
Editorial Foreword Team, Editorial
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies Vol 1, No 1 (2017): July
Publisher : Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ikat.v1i1.33297

Abstract

Undeniably a region in change, interest in Southeast Asia is growing. With this growth comes an increase in academic works written about the region, adding to an already impressive canon. With this background in mind, the Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS) at the Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia is proud to publish IKAT: The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies. This journal welcomes and facilitates exchange in academics and disseminates knowledge produced through this growing interest in Southeast Asia.The name IKAT was adopted to reflect a shared practice found in Southeast Asia. It is derived from the word Tenun Ikat, meaning woven fabric, which is a common textile in the region. In addition, IKAT is an Indonesian word, which means to bind, bundle, tie, or bunch. It is our hope that the publication of the IKAT Journal will serve as a platform for those interested in Southeast Asia, binding together those with a common geographical interest. As a means to unite the region, IKAT is open to contributions from all disciplines. This interdisciplinarity enables us to examine and reflect upon Southeast Asia from a plethora of perspectives, each focusing on diverse issues. 
Adaptive Organizational Communication of ASEAN from an Autopoietic Systems Perspective Christianti, Dian; Wahyuni, Hermin Indah
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies Vol 1, No 1 (2017): July
Publisher : Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (576.192 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ikat.v1i1.27469

Abstract

This article focuses on ASEAN after the establishment of its community in a systems perspective. The problem elicited in this research is how the ASEAN Secretariats adaptive communication is able to cope with challenges stemming from the establishment. To answer the question, a case study is applied, using data collection techniques including document analysis, interview, and observation. The findings reveal that ASEAN adaptive communication has allowed the association to grow rapidly to deal with difficulties. It is not, however, as ideal as a system proposed by Luhmann.
ASEAN in the Age of Anti-Globalization: Compartmentalized Regionalism(s) and Three Trajectories Choiruzzad, Shofwan Al Banna
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies Vol 1, No 1 (2017): July
Publisher : Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (480.305 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ikat.v1i1.27464

Abstract

This essay attempts to examine the prospect of ASEAN integration in the age of anti-globalization by understanding ASEAN as a compartmentalized regionalism. It argues that discussions on the prospect of ASEAN are actually discussions on the trajectories of two separate regional projects: economic regionalism and political security regionalism. It must be noted that we often have difficulties separating the two because their evolution has so far been marked by centripetal movement towards liberal tradition in the two regional projects. However, since we are entering the age of anti-globalization, this is changing. To make an educated guess on the future of ASEAN regionalism(s), I argue that we should focus our attention to three main indicators: (1) Structural: will the international system be cooperative or competitive multipolar system? (2) National elite orientation: will the liberal elites and technocracy in ASEAN countries remain liberal, or will nationalist elites take charge?; and (3) Public sentiment: how big is the positive or negative sentiment towards economic liberalization?
Why ASEAN is Cooperating in the Education Sector? Gawron, Jan
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies Vol 1, No 1 (2017): July
Publisher : Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (729.974 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ikat.v1i1.27471

Abstract

Over the last few years ASEAN member states have begun collaborating more tightly in the tertiary education sector, which has led to a cooperation agreement with the European Union to help harmonize and lift the overall standard of tertiary education in the region. However, the broader question is - why is that the case? Education is not considered a classical field of regional integration, and this chapter seeks to analyze various sources - which include references from elitist circles, as well as the public sphere - in order to identify the motivation for cooperation in the education sector through qualitative content analysis. The analysis is based on a theoretical framework, which incorporates both a neofunctionalist approach and a norm diffusion approach which show that the predominant factors behind this cooperation process are economic.
Comparative Study of the Roles of ASEAN and the Organization of Islamic Cooperation in Responding to the Rohingya Crisis Jati, Irawan
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies Vol 1, No 1 (2017): July
Publisher : Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (474.59 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ikat.v1i1.27466

Abstract

Since 2012, Southeast Asia has witnessed the human rights tragedy of the Rohingya people of Myanmar. Hundreds of thousands of Rohingya have been displaced from their homes and traveled to refugee facilities in Myanmar and Bangladesh, while others have been stranded on the Andaman Sea. The Rohingya crisis is perhaps the most horrific human rights tragedy after the crisis in Vietnam in the 1970s. As the crisis has developed, international communities, including ASEAN and the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), have responded to the crisis. As the main regional organization, ASEAN has been hoped to elucidate the crisis tactically through peaceful means. OIC, meanwhile, has been expected to join humanitarian action using a diplomatic approach to other international humanitarian bodies, including the UNHCR. However, it is obvious that ASEANs response to the crisis has been limited to diplomatic oration and failed to prevent a wider crisis. For OIC, its humanitarian solidarity has lacked access to the target community. Therefore, this paper would like to attempt a comparative analysis to describe the central inquiry; how have ASEAN and OIC responded to the Rohingya crisis? This analysis involves studying ASEAN and OIC publications and related references. The initial argument of this paper is that both organizations have given reasonable responses to the crisis, but have been unable to halt its advance.
Islam, Asymmetric Policy, and Social Conflict: The States Role as a Root of Radicalism in the Philippines and Thailand Kusuma, Bayu Mitra A.
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies Vol 1, No 1 (2017): July
Publisher : Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (471.412 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ikat.v1i1.27467

Abstract

Radicalism has become a serious problem for many countries, including in Southeast Asia. One of its triggering factors is an extreme understanding of religion that leads to the assumption that people with different understandings are wrong and that violence is a legitimate way to change the situation. This often occurs because of a love of lineage or clan, as well as aggressive instincts. Such an extreme understanding results in the religious social conflicts, which in reality—particularly those involving Islam in Southeast Asia—are often influenced by regimes’ asymmetric policies. This study, therefore, explores the role of the State as a root of radicalism in the context of the dynamic relationship between Islam and asymmetric policies, with a focus on the southern Philippines and Thailand. Research findings show that the rise of radicalism in the Philippines was caused by social conflict resulting from government manipulation of referendum policy on special autonomy in predominant Muslim areas. Meanwhile, radicalism in Thailand was triggered by social conflict resulting from the cultural assimilation policy imposed upon the Muslim community by the government.
Full Text IKAT Vol. 1, No. 1, July 2017 Octastefani, Theresia
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies Vol 1, No 1 (2017): July
Publisher : Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ikat.v1i1.33203

Abstract

The East Asian Economy Post-rebalancing: Domestic Demand-led Growth, Social Security, and Inequality Mizuno, Kosuke
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies Vol 1, No 1 (2017): July
Publisher : Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (726.999 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ikat.v1i1.27468

Abstract

East Asian, including ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations), countries have pursued the export-oriented development strategies, attracting foreign direct investment and promoting export-driven growth. However, after the Lehman shock, these countries adopted rebalancing policies from export-driven growth to domestic demand-driven growth. Chinese measures to promote domestic demand since 2008 had succeeded in boosting the economy until 2011 with domestic investments and increase in consumption. Chinese economic growth until 2011–2012 made possible an international commodity boom that resulted in the economic development of Malaysia and Indonesia. However, since 2012, the Chinese economy has been suffering from excess capacity and bad loans, hence ending the international commodity boom. ASEAN countries promptly started rebalancing by cutting back on their reliance on exports and increasing domestic investment and consumption, with variation among the countries. ASEAN countries pursued inclusive policies such as education, medical care, and social security. These policies promoted consumption and investment, helping grow the middle class. However, technological progress, globalization, and market-oriented reforms have also been the driving inequality in many Asian countries in the last two decades, and these forces have changed income distribution through three channels, namely, capital, skill, and spatial bias. Inequality created by conventional development strategies in this region has become the basis for conflicts among the region’s different economic strata. Inequality has had the effect of depressing investment—and thus growth—by fueling economic, financial, and political instability.

Page 1 of 1 | Total Record : 8