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IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies
ISSN : 25806580     EISSN : 25979817     DOI : -
Core Subject : Economy, Education,
The Journal strives to provide new, rigorous and comprehensive knowledge and understanding of Southeast Asia through inter-disciplinary perspectives. Its scopes includes but is not limited to economic welfare, institutional knowledge production, history, political transformations and the social development of information and communication technology in the region. Contributors may focus on an in-depth individual country analysis or on comparing a multi-country case study. Given the mission statement of CESASS, contributors are encouraged to submit empirical, methodological, theoretical, or conceptual articles about Southeast Asia through the eye of social sciences.
Arjuna Subject : -
Articles 28 Documents
Editorial Foreword Giddens, Anthony
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies Vol 2, No 2 (2019): January
Publisher : Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (157.141 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ikat.v2i2.42763

Abstract

First of all, to begin with I would like to say how much I support this initiative to promote social science. This special issue of IKAT: the Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies is originated from the symposium held in September where I delivered my recorded speech through online media in September 4th, 2018. We should highlight that the social science is very crucial to understanding the contemporary world, therefore of core important to the trajectory of any country today. The social sciences were born out of transformation in the 17, 18, 19thcenturies in the west of course), firstly the origin of modern states and origin of politics, then the industrial revolutions, then the origin of economics, and in the 19thcentury, those things becoming more widespread to the world that create Sociology and Anthropology.
Social Science Research in Southeast Asia: the Challenges of Studying Parliamentary Institutions Adiputri, Ratih
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies Vol 2, No 2 (2019): January
Publisher : Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (406.885 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ikat.v2i2.40814

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This paper introduces the challenges of studying parliamentary institutions in Southeast Asia. My focus of research is in three countries’ institutions: national parliaments of Indonesia, Malaysia and Singapore. While in Southeast Asia, it is widely known that studying issues of politics and institutions face challenges – compared to studying culture, for example, this view is arguably no longer valid, however with certainqualification.The comparison of parliamentary tradition between three countries – based on observation of the plenary session - reveals that the effectiveness of parliamentary works is related to parliamentary procedure, and even to the culture of work in the countries. Parliamentary structure, procedure and their political culture matters. Therefore, acknowledging these factors will give rise to more research opportunities, if a researcher plans to study the political institution in other countries in Southeast Asia.
Truth Tampering Through Social Media: Malaysia’s Approach in Fighting Disinformation & Misinformation Mohd Yatid, Moonyati
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies Vol 2, No 2 (2019): January
Publisher : Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (582.003 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ikat.v2i2.40482

Abstract

Though poorly defined and highly politicized, the term ‘Fake News’ has beenpopularized by the Trump administration in recent years. Scholars prefer to use terms such as Information Disorder, in particular Disinformation and Misinformation, to discuss this global concern. The dissemination of disinformation and misinformation is not new. However, the penetration of social media and messaging applications today enable such information to spread much faster, deeper and wider. Further, social media and messaging applications have become the public’s source of primary information. These platforms are fast-becoming a birthplace of the manipulation of truth andthe influencing of public opinion. The advancement of technology has alsobeen manipulated to create false information and add to the severity of the problem. The impact of disinformation and misinformation varies: fromfinancial difficulties faced by businesses to influencing the outcome of electionsto physical violence triggered by racial and religious tensions. This paper aims to explore: 1) How information disorder, in particular, disinformation and misinformation, are being disseminated through social media and instantmessaging platforms to influence public opinion; 2)How states respond to disinformation and misinformation; 3) Malaysia’s disinformation andmisinformation landscape and 4) Key areas for Malaysia to improve on, namely enhancing its current legal responses, developing digital literacy, heightening the accountability of social media platforms and strengthening the fact-checking mechanism.
Empowering Social Science Research in the Big-Data Era: Addressing Quantyphobia in IR Researches Mohd Razalli, Farizal
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies Vol 2, No 2 (2019): January
Publisher : Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (38.444 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ikat.v2i2.40431

Abstract

This paper tries to explore the employment of quantitative approach in political researches focusing on international relations (IR) or international politics. A debate emerged in the90s on whether IR or the field of international politics should be driven by quantitative(positivistic) approach at the expense of qualitative (interpretivist) approach. The debate then expanded to explicitly argue for an increased use of formal methods that are mathematically-based to study IR phenomena. It triggered then a quick reaction fromhardcore IR specialists who warned against mathematizing IR for fear of turning the field into a mechanical field that crunches numbers. Such a fear is further substantiated by theobservation that many quantitative works in IR have moved farther away from developing theory to testing hypotheses. Some scholars have even suggested that it is epistemologicallyrealism vs. instrumentalism; something that is unsurprising given the dominance of realism inIR for many years. This paper does not suggest that heavy emphasis on qualitative approach leads to a inferior research output. However, it does suggest an transformative incapability among IR scholars to accommodate to contemporary global changes. The big-data analyticshave affected the intellectual community of late with the influx of data. These data are bothqualitative and quantitative. Nonetheless, analyzing them requires one to be familiar with quantitative methods lest one risks not being able to offer a research outcome that is not only sound in its argumentation but also robust in its analytical logic. Furthermore, with so much data on the social media, it is almost unthinkable for meaningful interpretation tobe made without even the simplest descriptive statistical methods. The key findings revealthat in ensuring its relevance, international political researches have to start adapting to the contemporary changes by building new capability apart from upscaling existing capacity.
Transitional Production of Knowledge For Civic Trust and Social Integration: Social Science in the Transitional Justice Process G??b, Katarzyna Marta
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies Vol 2, No 2 (2019): January
Publisher : Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (296.722 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ikat.v2i2.40231

Abstract

This article aims to show that transitional justice should be understood extensively, going beyond the legal-criminal view (transitional justice in the narrow sense). The main argument of research is that social sciences offer a prepared methodological set, without which it is impossible to study these processes effectively, and thus it is impossible to carry out effective social reform, what the cases of some countries show. More andmore often, this is said about the significant role of reconciliation, buildingsocial trust and social cohesion, achieved through extra-legal means, using non-judicial mechanisms. The author intentions to highlight the rooting of transitional justice in this broader sense in social sciences and outline the relationship between truth and political regimes, explaining the dynamic relation of truth-knowledge to political power, but also to highlight the issue of overcoming the problematic universality of transitional justice.
Diplomatic Correspondence: A Comparative Study on Malay and Javanese Letters in 1800s Majid, Gilang Maulana
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies Vol 2, No 2 (2019): January
Publisher : Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (513.536 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ikat.v2i2.39239

Abstract

A more established tradition may set an indirect consensus for thecommunication between rulers in any situation. This article identifies howdiplomatic correspondence was conducted and how different perceptions could actually be negotiated to attain certain goals. Two diplomatic letters – one from the Panembahan of Sumenep and one from the Sultanof Yogyakarta dispatched to Thomas Stamford Raffles to address Raffles’retirement during the British interregnum in Java from 1811 to 1816 –were analyzed. These letters were chosen due to the different scripts and languages used in the two letters: Classical Malay Jawi and Old Javanese'aksara Jawa'. By applying content analysis, this study finds that the Malay language was not only influential throughout the Indonesian archipelagoas a medium for verbal communication, but its letter-writing tradition even clearly affected its Javanese counterpart, setting a standard writing style for diplomatic letters.
Analyzing Thai Border School Policy Formation in the ASEAN Community Era Kaewkumkong, Ampa
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies Vol 2, No 2 (2019): January
Publisher : Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (675.178 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ikat.v2i2.38632

Abstract

During the 1990s, Thailand’s border areas became more open as a result of improved political relations in the region, especially in regards to the promotion of border trade and transnational trade among Indochinese countries under the“From a Battlefield to a Marketplace” policy. In terms of education development,the nature of border schools in general has been gradually evolving over the past 60 years, and Thai border schools have improved considerably over this period.The first initiative undertaken in regards to border schools in Thailand was the official establishment of the “Border Patrol Police (BPP) School” in 1956. Inmore recent years, education development policy in border areas has repeatedlybeen modified, particularly since Thailand’s agreement to further integrate withother Southeast Asian countries as a part of the ASEAN Community 2015. In 2010, Thailand’s commitment to developing its border schools increased whenit began development of the “Buffer School” program as part of a strategic plan to improve educational institutions under the ASEAN “Spirit of ASEAN” policy.This policy aimed to promote education development and cooperation within the ASEAN through a range of initiatives, including ones pertaining to border areas. This paper thus aims to 1) review the substance of the Buffer School program as it pertains to emerging Thai border school policy in the ASEAN Community era, as well as the structure of its enforcement, then, 2) analyze the background and rationale of policymaking that has occurred from agenda-setting and policy formulation up until policy enactment corresponding to ASEAN frameworks derived from the ASEAN charter and Work Plan on Education.
‘As if it Was Something Spoken by a Friend’: The Study of Digital Vote-Canvassing Networks on Facebook During the 2013 Bangkok Gubernatorial Election Campaign Pratheepwatanawong, Mukda
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies Vol 2, No 1 (2018): July
Publisher : Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (625.54 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ikat.v2i1.37394

Abstract

Adapting the idea of the traditional vote-canvassing network for the analysis of electoral politics in the digital arena and using the concept of ‘two-steps flow’, this paper explores the way in which Facebook was used to establish and develop ‘digital vote-canvassing networks’ during the 2013 Bangkok gubernatorial election campaign, which was the latest and a completed election in Thailand. This paper attempts to answer the question ‘How was the relationship among the individuals who were part of the candidates’ networks on social networking sites developed during the 2013 Bangkok gubernatorial election campaign?’ This research used multimodal analysis to determine the two main contenders’ strategy in expanding their Facebook network during the 2013 Bangkok gubernatorial election campaign. This research also conducted a total of 14 semi-structured interviews with Thai politicians, election candidates and their public relations personnel to examine the significant of relationship, interaction and spreadability of content on SNSs during the election campaign. This paper argues that the development of relationships among people connected to the digital vote-canvassing networks was integrated through the coordination and dissemination of campaign content on Facebook to enhance the electoral ties between candidates, their followers and followers’ friends, who might or might not be voters of the election. Vote-canvassing systems become ‘digital’ when a candidate’s public relations personnel acted as core vote-canvassers who manage and transmit campaign messages on the candidate’s Facebook page on behalf of the candidate, while the candidate’s followers interacted and spread the candidate’s campaign message to their own networks, enabling more Facebook users, who are connected to candidates’ Facebook page, in one way or another, to be exposed to the campaign content. However, there is no guarantee of votes in the digital vote-canvassing network.
Frenemy in Media: Maritime Sovereignty and Propaganda on South China Sea Wijaya, Lupita
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies Vol 1, No 2 (2018): January
Publisher : Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (754.037 KB) | DOI: 10.22146/ikat.v1i2.32358

Abstract

When Indonesia struggles to fight illegal fishing in 2016, Indonesian Navy has caught several Chinese fishing boats in its 200-mile exclusive economic zone (EEZ) off the Natuna Island. Although, many have trespassed Indonesia’s EEZ, conducted illegal fishing and been scuttled, China is the only country that backs up their fishermen with military forces. After Indonesia officially sent diplomatic protest note over the incident, China replied that the seizing had no official grounded as the area was actually claimed as traditional fishing ground by China. This position may leave Indonesia in frenemy position with China. Regional conflict such as South China Sea has been diligently highlighted in international coverage. If it’s about involvement of home country conflict, the concept of objectivity journalism has been under questioned. This embodied-concept has raised because of broad range of contextualization in international coverage. Interdependency between media systems and political systems interprets how propaganda influences on the media within the national interest frames of ideology, particularly when the global issue involving their home countries. There are nine propaganda techniques including name calling, glittering generalities, transfer, testimonial, plain folks, card stacking, bandwagon, frustration of scapegoat and fear. Applying comparative content analysis of Indonesian and Chinese state-run wire services of ANTARA and Xinhua, and three most popular news websites: China Daily, People’s Daily and Kompas this study identifies types of national interest frames including common, conflict, and threat interest frames. It is found out that media perform propaganda techniques which later depict the frenemy position according to their national interest frames.
Editorial Foreword Team, Editorial
IKAT : The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies Vol 1, No 1 (2017): July
Publisher : Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.22146/ikat.v1i1.33297

Abstract

Undeniably a region in change, interest in Southeast Asia is growing. With this growth comes an increase in academic works written about the region, adding to an already impressive canon. With this background in mind, the Center for Southeast Asian Social Studies (CESASS) at the Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia is proud to publish IKAT: The Indonesian Journal of Southeast Asian Studies. This journal welcomes and facilitates exchange in academics and disseminates knowledge produced through this growing interest in Southeast Asia.The name IKAT was adopted to reflect a shared practice found in Southeast Asia. It is derived from the word Tenun Ikat, meaning woven fabric, which is a common textile in the region. In addition, IKAT is an Indonesian word, which means to bind, bundle, tie, or bunch. It is our hope that the publication of the IKAT Journal will serve as a platform for those interested in Southeast Asia, binding together those with a common geographical interest. As a means to unite the region, IKAT is open to contributions from all disciplines. This interdisciplinarity enables us to examine and reflect upon Southeast Asia from a plethora of perspectives, each focusing on diverse issues. 

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