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LEKESAN
Lekesan is the name of Interdisciplinary Journal of Asia Pacific Arts, is dedicated to the best representation of Asia Pacific Arts from various perspectives. As the link of exchange knowledge and experience, its provides opportunities to world scholars, artists, and the community, who are focused in the aesthetic theory and practice of Asia Pacific Arts.
Articles
6
Articles
Meguru Panggul and Meguru Kuping; The Method of Learning and Teaching Balinese Gamelan

Sudirana, I Wayan

Lekesan: Interdisciplinary Journal of Asia Pacific Arts Vol 1, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Institut Seni Indonesia Denpasar

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Abstract

“True musical experience is the experience of trust”—trust between the student and teacher. Whatever teaching method a teacher applies, it will not work without any trust. “It is only when we learn to trust one another, to dissolve in the realization of our shared humanity, will the music finally play.” This is an autoethnography. It exhibits the long process of musicianship in a traditional Balinese community. Also, I explore how, as a modern Balinese musician, my musicianship fit in with the new musical setting of a Western community. The paper is divided into three parts: the first part is an exploration of the traditional learning process and Balinese musical pedagogy called meguru panggul. The second is an exploration of my experience in continuing my studies at ISI Denpasar (the Balinese Arts Institute)— how the teacher conducts the learning process in a formal setting, and my own discovery in learning with ear (meguru kuping). And lastly, the third explores the development of my perception and conception of a new learning and teaching style, when I was exposed to the Western way of teaching and learning music at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.

Interculturalism through a cognitive filter: Gilles Tremblay recomposes gamelan in Oralléluiants [1975]

Goldman, Jonathan

Lekesan: Interdisciplinary Journal of Asia Pacific Arts Vol 1, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Institut Seni Indonesia Denpasar

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Abstract

In an article on the impact of gamelan music on Claude Debussys musical language, Nicholas Cook shows Debussys musical interpretations that navigate between viewpoints that claim that the gamelan presents "confirmation" of the principles that have been acquired by French composers and others who judge inspired techniques from the gamelan to imitate foreign musical culture. This article applies Cooks thought to the Javanese gamelan inspiration case in Oralléluiants (1975) by Gilles Tremblay (1932-2017), by trying to go beyond the opposition between pastiche orientalist style and deeper style assimilation by giving credit to the composer Québécois. This paper proposes the idea of "cognitive filters" as a way to understand how gamelan affects Tremblay without the same effect on other composers who are exposed to the same musical culture. The phrase "cognitive filter" shows every musical schematic that listeners have not mastered in terms of their training, ability, acculturation and psychological specificity, and that represents an order perceptual data to enable in the capture of previously unknown music.

Curating the Painting Collection of the Presidential Palace of the Republic of Indonesia

Susanto, Mikke, Simatupang, GR. Lono L., Haryono, Timbul

Lekesan: Interdisciplinary Journal of Asia Pacific Arts Vol 1, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Institut Seni Indonesia Denpasar

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Abstract

The Presidential Palace of the Republic of Indonesias collection of art objects was started by Indonesias first president, Sukarno. Today, this collection includes more than 2,500 paintings, and as such this institution has acted like a museum. Throughout the tenure of Indonesias seven presidents, this collection has experienced diverse stories related to its curation by various individuals over time. This article will focus on the historical issues of this collections curation using qualitative research methods, in the hopes of revealing various curatorial issues. More specifically, the qualitative research conducted for this study is related to art history. This articleutilizes theory related to curation to discuss a number of topics, ranging from the role of the individuals responsible for the collection (i.e. curators), the systems of caring for and selecting works (curation), and the curatorial practices that have occurred until now. Elaborating on a number of archival documents related to this collection, this article examines the work of the collections curators, from inventorization to opening the collection to the public. Over the course of 70 years, the Presidential Palaces collection has undergone various forms of curation, including acquisition, documentation, preservation, and exhibition. This research concluded that the role of the curator is very important and causes the collection to be preserved and more valuable. As such, this article suggests a special museum related to the paintings within the palace collection.

Interpreting the Tri Mandala Concept on the Motif of Gringsing Wayang Kebo Woven Cloth

Mudra, I Wayan, Putriani, Nina Eka

Lekesan: Interdisciplinary Journal of Asia Pacific Arts Vol 1, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Institut Seni Indonesia Denpasar

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Abstract

Gringsing wayang kebo woven cloth is one of specialty cloths owned by Tenganan Pegringsingan Village, Manggis Sub-district, Karangasem Regency, Bali. This research aims to interpreting the Tri Mandala concept on the motif of gringsing wayang kebo woven cloth. The approach of this research is descriptive qualitative. Techniques for collecting data are observation, interview, and documentation, data analysis is using interactive analysis model and the validity of the data will be confirmed with triangulation technique. The result of this research shows that the motif of gringsing wayang kebo follows the of Tri Mandala concept that consists of 3 parts, Main pattern, Center pattern, and edge pattern. The motifs consisted of each pattern are 1). The motif on the main pattern consists of the plus, swastika, building, and scorpion motif; 2). The motif on the center pattern consists of an animal motif, floral, mountain, wayang; and; 3). The motif on the edge pattern consists of plus sign (+) and sun. 

Expansion Of Value And Form Dol Musicality As Ritual Tabot In Bengkulu

Parmadie, Bambang, Arya Sugiartha, I Gede

Lekesan: Interdisciplinary Journal of Asia Pacific Arts Vol 1, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Institut Seni Indonesia Denpasar

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Abstract

The expansion of value and form musicality in Tabot ritual music includes ideology, musicality and new sociocultural phenomena in the performing arts extend to all elements of Bengkulu society in general. The sacred music referred to in the Tabot rituals of Bengkulu is Dol music. The transformations in forms of Dol music and musicality are: sacred musicality becomes secular or profane. The physical form, function, and aesthetic of Dol music in Tabot rituals have an ever-increasing creativity in their development, musical progress and sociocultural-supporter progress. The commodification of Dol music transforms the artistic identity associated with new music from Bengkulu. The development of musicality moves freely, making changes in sacred ideology. This analysis reveals problems using social practice theory, hegemonic theory, and popular culture theory, applied eclectically by using a qualitative method. Data is collected Through observation, interview, and document study. The findings of this research are that there are forms of exploration and exploitation of Dol music from sacred to secular or profane and vice versa in the context of the commodification of physical musicality, function, and aesthetics in the ideological identity of the supporting community and the musical space dimension. The secular or profane Dol music permeates and indoctrinates the sacred Dol musical ideology as the musical ceremony of Tabot ritual. The counter-assumption about a sacred art form that will experience a shift into secular or profane is not entirely true for Dol music in Bengkulu.

Performing Authenticity And Contesting Heritage In The UNESCO-Inscribed Jerusarema/Mbende Dance Of Zimbabwe

Mapira, Nesta Nyaradzo, Hood, Made Mantle

Lekesan: Interdisciplinary Journal of Asia Pacific Arts Vol 1, No 1 (2018)
Publisher : Institut Seni Indonesia Denpasar

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Abstract

In African societies, traditional dances form and shape a multitude of cultural expressions that reflect socio-cultural status, stalwart traditions and degrees of heritage maintenance. Due to colonisation, westernisation and Christianity, the performative aesthetics of many African traditional dances have been drastically modified over time. One such traditional dance in Zimbabwe that has undergone continual socio-cultural and aesthetic change is Jerusarema/Mbende from the Murehwa and Uzumba-Maramba-Pfungwe districts of Mashonaland Eastern province. In 2005, The Mbende Jerusarema Dance of Zimbabwe was proclaimed on the United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) list of Masterpieces of Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity. Authentic elements of the dance were compiled by the Zimbabwe National Oral and Intangible Cultural Heritage (ZNOICH) committee in an effort to safeguard it against change. This safeguarding led the Jerusarema/Mbende dance along a contested path of endorsement and utilisation in multiple contexts by some performance ensembles such as Swerengoma, Ngomadzepasi, Zevezeve, Shingirirai and Makarekare as promoted by prominent dance festivals. These ensembles assert different agendas through music, props, instruments and dance movements. Drawing upon documentary video evidence from the National Arts Council of Zimbabwe and interviews, this paper evaluates the extent to which the authentic elements of the Jerusarema/Mbende dance inscribed on the UNESCO list have been safeguarded in formalised performances from 2013 to 2015. Video recordings from this period showing continuous participation of Ngoma Dzepasi, Makarekare and Shingirirai are used to assess similarities and differences from the fixity of authentic elements. We argue that UNESCO’s recognition of the Jerusarema/Mbende dance as intangible cultural heritage has, on the one hand, revived and maintained some characteristics of this dance but, on the other hand, gradually compromised innovative aesthetic music and dance elements introduced by inheriting generations.