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Paediatrica Indonesiana
ISSN : 00309311     EISSN : 2338476X     DOI : -
Paediatrica Indonesiana is a medical journal devoted to the health, in a broad sense, affecting fetuses, infants, children, and adolescents, belonged to the Indonesian Pediatric Society. Its publications are directed to pediatricians and other medical practitioners or researchers at all levels of health practice throughout the world.
Articles 1,379 Documents
Ventricular tachycardia in children with diphtheritic myocarditis Wahab, A. Samik
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 29 No 9-10 (1989): September 1989
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (368.792 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi29.9-10.1989.182-7

Abstract

Nine children with diphtheritic ventricular tachycardia ranging in age from 2 to 11 years (mean 6.5 years) were observed and followed up until their terminal state. The ventricular tachycardia showed a left bundle branch block contour in 5 of 9 patients, right bundle branch block in four, multifocal pacemaker in three and unifocal in six patients. Fusion and captured beats were present in two and 4 patients respectively, Including one patient who had both. Four cases were without obvious atrio-ventricular dissociation. All patients were treated with standard therapy for diphtheria, and prednison was given to patients with myocarditis. Because of its controversial results, antwrrhythm1c agent was not given. The prognosis is very poor; all patients died one to 8 days after ventricular tachycardia appearance.
Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia in Children : The Role of Infectious Diseases and Its Relationship to Serum Enzyme Wahab, A. Samik
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 29 No 9-10 (1989): September 1989
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (646.148 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi29.9-10.1989.173-81

Abstract

The records of 28 children whose first episode of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia occurred before 12 years (median age 10 months) were reviewed. There were 17 males and 11 females. In 17 cases the first attack occurred before the first year and in 11 of these it occurred after the first year. One case had congenital heart disease (ASD). The WPW syndrome was diagnosed in 3 cases. When first seen, most of the infants presented with signs of incipient or manifest congestive heart failure. In almost ninetenth fo cases rhere was an increased of serum enzymes (lactic dehydrogenase, creatinephosphokinase  and glutamic oxaloaccetic transaminase. Digitals was effective against congestive heart failure and when continued, might prevent failure during subsequent attacks. Antiarrhythmic agents other than digitals were not used. It is recommended to continue digitalis treatment for at least one year in all patients with SVT, whether or not the first episode terminated spontaneously.
Captopril Treatment in Rheumatic Heart Disease with Congestive Heart Failure A Preliminary Report Sastrosubroto, Hardiman; Soeroso, Santosa; Indrasanto, Eriyati
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 29 No 9-10 (1989): September 1989
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (522.794 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi29.9-10.1989.209-14

Abstract

A small scale controlled trial of captopril (ACE inhibitor) was conducted in 8 children with congestive heart failure due to rheumatic mitral regurgitation with or without mild mitral stenosis. The age of the patient ranged from 5.5 to 13 years (mean 9,3 years). Four children, served as control group, received digitalis and diuretics as standard treatment; while the other 4 children also received 2 x 12,5 mg of captopril in addition to standard treatment. The effect of both regimens were measured by usingchanges of left ventricular function as seen on the echocardiogram performed before treatment, and then 3, 7 and 14 days thereafter. Definite conclusion cannot be made because of the small number of patients; but it is apparent that some improvements of left ventricular functions in the captopril group were more evident when compared with that of the control group of standard treatment.Side effects of captopri/ were not found.
Results of proteinuria measurement using semiquantitative dipstick in children with fever or nephrotic syndrome Alaydrus, Chatidjah; Soenarto, Yati; Damanik, M. P.
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 48 No 1 (2008): January 2008
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (380.831 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi48.1.2008.10-4

Abstract

Background Proteinuria is a major determinant of the progressionof renal disease. Quantitative measurement of proteinuria withina 24-hour period of urine collection was the accepted method ofevaluation, but is tedious and prone to error in the absence of areliable collection. We evaluated the diagnostic value of AUTIONSticks 10 TA to diagnose proteinuria in children with fever andnephrotic syndrome.Methods This study was conducted at the pediatric ward of SardjitoHospital. Proteinuria levels were measured using semiquantitativedipstick methods with AUTION Sticks 10 TA using a 24-hoururine sample collected at the first examination until the followingday. Proteinuria level was also measured by Esbach method as goldstandard.Results A total of 120 children aged 16 years old were recruited. Inthe fever group, AUTION Sticks 10 TA couldn’t be used for thediagnostic test. AUTION Sticks 10 TA +2 to diagnose intermediateproteinuria produced a sensitivity of 60%, a specificity of 89%, apositive predictive value of 43% , a negative predictive value of94%, a positive likelihood ratio of 5.4, a negative likelihood ratio of0.45. To diagnose nephrotic proteinuria, AUTION Sticks 10 TA+3/+4 produced a sensitivity of 90%, a specificity of 91%, a positivepredictive value of 96%, a negative predictive value of 77%, apositive likelihood ratio of 10, a negative likelihood ratio of 0.11.Conclusion AUTION Sticks 10 TA +2 is sufficiently accuratefor a diagnostic test of intermediate proteinuria (Esbach value)while +3/+4 is sufficiently accurate for a diagnostic test ofnephrotic proteinuria (Esbach value) in children. In the fevergroup, dipstick result can not explain the Esbach value.
Relationship between newborn mid-upper-arm circumference and birth weight Taufiq, Muhammad Anwar; Madjid, Djauriah A.; Lisal, J. S.; Daud, Dasril
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 49 No 1 (2009): January 2009
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (123.635 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi49.1.2009.11-4

Abstract

Background  Recording  an  accurate  birth  weight  by  primaryhealth care workers has been a problem in rural areas, leadingto a search  for  an alternative, inexpensive, age independent andnoninvasive method to predict neonatal well being. Mid-upper-armcircumference (MUAC) might be  an  alternative anthropometricmeasurement useful  to  estimate the state of nutrition.Objective  To  evaluate  the  relationship  between  MUAC  andbirth weight  in  low birth weight (LBW) and normal birth weight(NBW) infants.Methods  We  measured birth weight and  MUAC  of  newbornbabies  of  various gestational ages  at  Siti Fatimah Maternity  andChildren's Hospital  and  Dr.  Wahidin Sudirohusodo  GeneralHospital, Makassar,  South  Sulawesi, Indonesia.  Correlationtests and diagnostic accuracy using different cut-off points wereperformedResults There were 892 live birth newborns (117 LBW and  775NBW) included in the study.  The  sensitivity, specificity, positivepredictive value, and negative value  for  MUACs  of<  10.3  em  were94.9  %,  99.9%, 99.1%, and 99.2%, respectively.  The  sensitivity,specificity, positive predictive value, and negative value  for  MUAC< 10.4  em  were 99.1  %,  99.6%, 97.5%, and 99.9%, respectively.The  sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negativevalue for MUAC < 10.5  em  were 100%,99.4%, 95.9%, and 100%,respectively.Conclusion  There  is  a strong correlation between  MUAC  andbirth weight. Birth weight can be predicted with the followingequation: Birth weight= -1776.383  +  (416.95 newborn  MUACvalue).  The  optimal cut-off point  for  the newborn MUAC value  forLBW infants  is<  10.5 em.
Autoimmune hemolytic anemia warm-antibody type (Warm AIHA) in an 8-year-old Balinese girl Yasa, Putu Tri; Mudita, Ida Bagus; Santoso, Hendra; Suraatmadja, Sudaryat
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 41 No 1-2 (2001): January 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (395.704 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi41.1.2001.64-8

Abstract

A case of autoimmune hemolytic anemia warm antibody type A (warm AIHA) in an 8-year-old Balinese girl was reported. The diagnosis was established based on clinical features, laboratory findings including positive Coombs'  test positive. The etiology was probably primary or Idiopathic. The child was transfused with packed red cells and treated with oral prednisone. The response of the treatment was good and she experienced complete remission. The prognosis in patients with idiopathic warm AIHA are unpredictable. The girl underwent further follow-up in the child hematologic division every two weeks.
Correlation of blood lead level and intelligence quotient in children Gunawan, Lilian; Masloman, Nurhayati
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 54 No 3 (2014): May 2014
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (123.089 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi54.3.2014.127-31

Abstract

Background Lead poisoning is a source of health problems inhumans. A chronic complication oflead poisoning in children ispermanent intellectual impairment.Objective To assess for a correlation of blood lead levels andintelligence quotient (IQ) in children.Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in children aged6 to 8 years in th e Talawaan (a rural area) and Wenang (an urbanarea) Distticts, North Sulawesi, from April to July 2012. Blood leadlevels were measured using the graphite furnace atomic absorptionspectrometry technique; and intelligence was meas ured with theWechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Indonesian version.Results There were 50 subjects from the Talawaan District and 54subjects from the Wenang Disttict in this study. The mean bloodlead level in the Talawaan District subjects was significantly higherthan that of the Wenang Disttict subjects [25.8 (SD 16.98) μgidLvs 11.4 (SD 13.81) μgidL, respectively; (P<0.001)]. There was aweak negative correlation between blood lead level and IQ in theTalawaan Disttict children (P= 0.038; r= -0.3). As such, there wasa 0.05 IQ point decrement associated with each increase of 1 μ gidLin blood lead level in Talawaan District children. However, therewas no correlation between blood lead level and IQ in the WenangDisttict children (P=0.42; r =0.03).Conclusion There is a weak negative correlation between bloodlead level and IQ in children living in a rural area, howevei; thiscorrelation is not found in children living in an urban area.
Study of blood pressure in elementary school children at hill and seashore areas Ariani, Ani; Lisma, T Erna; Lubis, Iskandar Z; Ramayati, Rafita; Rusdidjas, Rusdidjas
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 1 (2003): January 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (253.931 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.1.2003.6-9

Abstract

Background Measurement of blood pressure is the most impor-tant tool for early detection of hypertension. There is an assump-tion that salt consumption of the population living at the seashoreis higher than that of those living on the hill area, and it would leadto higher blood pressure.Objective To find out whether there is any difference of bloodpressure between school-age children (6-13 years) living on thehill area (Brastagi subdistrict) and those living at the seashore area(Pantai Cermin sub district), North Sumatra.Methods A cross sectional study was conducted in Brastagi andPantai Cermin from September to October 1995. The subjects weretaken by a simple random sampling method. The blood pressurewas measured based on recommendation of The Second TaskForce on Blood Pressure Control in Children 1987.Results The means systolic pressure in boys of 6 years of age aswell as in girls of 6,8,12 and 13 years, and the means of diastolicpressure in girls of 6,7,8,11 years were higher in Pantai Cermin(p<0.05). Blood pressure had significant positive correlations(p<0.001) with age, weight and height in both areas. Overall, hy-pertension was found in 117 (11%) out of 1065 children, 11.6%among girls and 10.6% among boys. On the hill and at seashorearea, hypertension was found in 10.2% and 11.8% of children re-spectively, which was not statistically different (p>0.05).Conclusion In children, there was no significant difference be-tween the prevalence of hypertension on hill and seashore area
Comparison of seroconversion rates between low-dose intradermal and recommended dose intramuscular hepatitis B vaccination in children Harsono, Sony HA; Anwar, Zarkasih; Pardede, Nancy
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 43 No 4 (2003): July 2003
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (724.828 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi43.4.2003.140-6

Abstract

Introduction Massive hepatitis B vaccination is expensive. Re-sults of studies showed that reduced dosage given intradermallyto adults and intramuscularly to children were able to induceseroconversion.Objective To compare the anti-HBs seroconversion (seropositiveand seroprotective) rates between intradermal low-dose of 2 mg(ID-2) and intramuscular recommended dose of 10 mg (IM-10)vaccination against hepatitis B.Methods In a randomized clinical trial, using the hepatitis B plasmavaccine, elementary school children in Tanjung Enim subdistrict,80-168 months of age, were randomly assigned to be given threedoses of either the ID-2 (n=59) or IM-10 (n=64) vaccinations atone month intervals. Seropositive (anti HBs titer >2.1 mIU/l) andseroprotective (anti HBs >10 mIU/l) rates as well as the seroposi-tive and seroprotective geometric mean antibody titers (GMTs) werecompared one month after each inoculation. A p value of <0.1was considered statistically significant.Results One month after the third inoculation, there was no sig-nificant difference in the seropositive rate (95% vs. 89%),seroprotective rate (85% vs. 83%), seropositive GMTs (55.85 mIU/l vs. 61.24mIU/l), and seroprotective GMTs (73.86 mIU/l vs. 72.49mIU/l) between the ID-2 and the IM-10 groups (all with p>0.1)Conclusion Reduced doses of the hepatitis B vaccine given in-tradermally may offer protection against hepatitis B, thus it may beuseful for mass vaccination programs
Correlation of heart failure severity and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide level in children Mahrani, Yasmien; Nova, Ria; Saleh, Masagus Irsan; Rahadianto, Kemas Yakub
Paediatrica Indonesiana Vol 56 No 6 (2016): November 2016
Publisher : Indonesian Pediatric Society

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (281.152 KB) | DOI: 10.14238/pi56.6.2016.315-9

Abstract

Background  Heart failure affects morbidity and mortality in children with heart disease. There is no single, specific test to diagnose heart failure. The modified Ross Reithmann scoring system has been used to classify heart failure severity, but it is limited due to its subjectivity. The N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is secreted by the ventricles during heart failure. It has been suggested as a possible marker for diagnosing heart failure.Objective To investigate the correlation between heart failure severity and plasma NT-proBNP concentration in children aged one month to 14 years.Methods A cross-sectional study was performed in the Pediatrics Department of Mohammad Hoesin Hospital from July to September 2015 on children with congestive heart failure, aged one month to 14 years. Heart failure severity was assesed using the modified Ross Reithmann scoring system. Plasma NT-proBNP measurements were done in all subjects. Statistical analysis was done by Spearman’s test.Results  Subjects’ median plasma NT-proBNP concentration was 1,703 pg/mL (range 310-9,000 pg/mL). The NT-proBNP level and severity of heart failure had a significant, positive correlation (r=0.87; P<0.001). The NT-proBNP minimum levels in subjects with mild, moderate and severe heart failure were 310 pg/mL, 1,251 pg/mL, and 2,610 pg/mL, respectively.Conclusion Plasma NT-proBNP level has a significant, positive correlation with the severity of heart failure in children. As such, NT-proBNP level may be useful as a biochemical marker for the diagnosis and grading of the severity of heart failure in children.

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