Prasetya, Hanung
Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Contextual Effect of Village on the Risk of Pneumonia in Children Under Five in Magetan, East Java Mustikarani, Yola Alqorien; Rahardjo, Setyo Sri; Qadridjati, Isna; Prasetya, Hanung
Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health Vol 4, No 2 (2019)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Background: Pneumonia is a major cause of illness and death in children under five worldwide. Studies into the contextual effect of village are lacking in Indonesia. This study aimed to determine contextual effect of village on the risk of pneumonia in children under five in Magetan, East Java.Subjects and Method: This was a case control study conducted in Magetan, East Java, from October 2018 to December 2018. A sample of 225 children under five from 25 villages was selected by fixed disease sampling. The dependent variable was pneumonia. The independent variables were nutritional status, vitamin A intake, maternal stress, maternal education, family income, family smoking, cooking fuel, house physical environment, and the presence of children in the kitchen when cooking. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by a multilevel logistic regression.Results: Maternal stress (b= 1.91; 95% CI= 0.75 to 3.06; p= 0.001), family smoking habits (b = 1.39; 95% CI = 0.46 to 2.32; p = 0.003), cooking fuel (b= 1.51; 95% CI= 0.46 to 2.55; p= 0.005), and the presence of children in the kitchen when cooking (b= 1.37; 95% CI = 0.38 to 2.35; p= 0.007) increased the risk of pneumonia in children under five. The risk of pneumonia was reduced by good nutritional status (b= -1.74; 95% CI= -2.70 to -0.78; p <0.001), complete vitamin A status (b= -1.14; 95% CI= -2.04 to -0.24; p= 0.013), high maternal education (b= -1.41; 95% CI= -2.45 to -0.37; p= 0.008), high family income (b= -0.91; 95% CI= -1.80 to -0.02; p= 0.045), and healthy home physical environment (b= -1.86; 95% CI= -3.20 to -0.52; p= 0.007). Village had a strong contextual effect on pneumonia among children under five with ICC= 21.32%.Conclusions: Maternal stress, family smoking habits, cooking fuel, and the presence of children in the kitchen when cooking increase the risk of pneumonia in children under five. It is reduced by good nutritional status, complete vitamin A status, high maternal education, high family income, and healthy home physical environment. Village has a strong contextual effect on pneumonia among children under fiveKeywords: pneumonia, children under five, biopsychosocial, environmental, determinants, multilevel analysisCorrespondence: Yola Alqorien Mustikarani. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret. Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta, Central Java 57126, Indonesia. Email: yolla.mstika@gmail.com. Mobile: +6285856122288Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health (2019), 4(2): 117-126https://doi.org/10.26911/jepublichealth.2019.04.02.07
Social Cognitive Theory on the Domestic Violence in Yogyakarta Jati, Linda Puspita; Joebagio, Hermanu; Prasetya, Hanung
Journal of Maternal and Child Health Vol 4, No 5 (2019)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Background: Domestic violence (also named domestic abuse or family violence) is violence or other abuse by one person against another in a domestic setting, such as in marriage or cohabitation. This study aimed to explore domestic violence in Yogyakarta using Social Cognitive Theory.Subjects and Method: This was a qualitative study using phenomenology approach. The study was carried out in a non-government organization, in Yogyakarta, in November 2018. The key informants included counselor at the Swadaya Masyarakat Rifka Annisa Yogyakarta and two victims of domestic violence. The data were collected by in-depth interview, participative observation, and document review. Results:There were variations of domestic violence, but the majority stemmed from external factors. Social environment, perceived gender equality, socioeconomic factor, and patriarchal culture affected the incidence of domestic violence. The educational background did not affect the risk of domestic violence. All victims experienced domestic violence due to gender inequality in decision making. Domestic violence could be physical or psychic.Conclusion: Domestic violence is affected by social environment, perceived gender equality, socioeconomic factor, and patriarchal culture. The educational background did not affect the risk of domestic violence.Keywords: domestic violence, Social Cognitive TheoryCorrespondence: Linda Puspita Jati. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret. Jl. Ir. Sutami36 A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java, Indonesia. Email: linda.puspitajati@student.uns.ac.id. Mobile: +6285643538539. Journal of Maternal and Child Health (2019), 4(5): 326-334https://doi.org/10.26911/thejmch.2019.04.05.04
Application of Health Belief Model on Factors Influencing Long-Term Contraceptive Use Pitaloka, Ayu Dhiah; Pawito, Pawito; Prasetya, Hanung
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior Vol 4, No 1 (2019)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Background: Family planning is one of the strategies to reduce maternal mortality. Data in 2017 shows that in Indonesia, out of 37,338,265 couples of reproductive age there were 18.63% who did not do family planning. Women of reproductive age (WRA) who have not done family planning can affect reproductive health. This study aimed to analyze factors influencing long-term contraceptive method (LTCM) using health belief model theory.Subjects and Method: This was a cross sectional study conducted in Sleman, Central Java, from March to April 2019. A sample of 220 women of reproductive age was selected by quota sampling. The dependent variable was LTCM use. The independent variables were perceived severity, perceived susceptibility, perceived benefit, cues to action, self-efficacy, education, and culture. The data was collected by questionnaire and analyzed by a multiple logistic regression.Results: Perceived severity (OR= 8.02; 95% CI= 2.62 to 24.51; p<0.001), perceived susceptibility (OR= 12.16; 95% CI= 3.65 to 40.42; p<0.001), perceived benefit (OR= 6.05; 95% CI= 2.10 to 17.40; p= 0.001), cues to action (OR= 6.98; 95% CI= 2.30 to 21.18; p= 0.001), self-efficacy (OR= 3.60; 95% CI= 1.23 to 10.52; p= 0.019), education (OR= 2.50; 95% CI= 1.40 to 10.41; p= 0.029), culture (OR= 6.65; 95% CI= 2.14 to 20.62; p= 0.001) increased long-term contraceptive use.Conclusions: Perceived severity, perceived susceptibility, perceived benefit, cues to action, self-efficacy, education, culture increase long-term contraceptive use.Keywords: family planning, long-term contraceptive, health belief modelCorrespondence: Ayu Dhiah Pitaloka. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret. Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: ayudhiahp@gmail.com. Mobile: +62812266896­2­­­­91Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2019), 4(1): 55-63https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2019.04.01.06 
The Contextual Effect of School on the Premarital Sex among Adolescents in Bantul, Yogyakarta Pertiwi, Galuh Tunjung; Prasetya, Hanung; Murti, Bhisma
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior Vol 3, No 4 (2018)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Background: Previous studies have identified individual and school‐level characteristics that are associated with sexual risk‐taking. But similar studies in Indonesia is lacking. This study aimed to examine the contextual effect of school on the premarital sex among adolescents in Bantul, Yogyakarta.Subjects and Method: This was a cross-sectional study carried out at 25 senior high schools in Bantul, Yogyakarta, from November to December 2018. A sample of 225 adolescents aged 15-18 years was selected by stratified random sampling. The dependent variable was premarital sex. The independent variables were the intention, subjective norm, perceived behavior control, family intimacy, and peer group. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by a multilevel logistic regression on Stata 13.Results: Premarital sex incrased with favorable intention (b= 2.70; 95% CI= 0.50 to 3.15; p= 0.007), subjective norm (b= 4.66; 95% CI= 1.89 to 4.63; p<0.001), and suitable peer group (b= 4.34; 95% CI= 1.99 to 5.28; p<0.001). Premarital sex decreased with positive attitude (b= -4.31; 95% CI= -4.15 to -1.55; p<0.001), strong perceived behavior control (b= -2.37; 95% CI= -2.53 to -0.23; p=0.018), and strong family intimacy (b= -2.44; 95% CI= -2.69 to 0.29; p=0.015). There was contextual effect of school on premarital sex with ICC= 63.72%.Conclusion: Premarital sex increases with favorable intention, subjective norm, and suitable peer group. Premarital sex decreases with positive attitude, strong perceived behavior control, and strong family intimacy. There is a contextual effect of school on premarital sex, which calls for attention.Keywords: premarital sex, school, multilevel analysisCorrespondence: Galuh Tunjung Pertiwi. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Sura­karta, Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: galuh­pertiwi2017­@gmail.­com. Mobile: +6281229722373.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(4): 240-247https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.04.03 
Path Analysis on the Risk Factors of Sexually Transmitted Disease among Men Who Have Sex with Men Community in Surakarta Nurhalimah, Siti; Prasetya, Hanung; Murti, Bhisma
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior Vol 3, No 3 (2018)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Background: Men who have sex with men (MSM) have a higher prevalence of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI) than the heterosexual men. The number of STI cases in MSM in Indonesia in 2017 was 4,144. The study aimed to examine risk factors of sexually transmitted disease among MSM community in Surakarta, Central Java.Subjects and Method: This was a cross-sectional study carried out in Surakarta, Central Java, from October to November 2018. A sample of 188 MSM was selected by fixed diseases sampling. The variable dependent was STI. The independent variables were age, education, number of sexual partners, sexual behavior, intention, attitude, perceived behavior control, and subjective norm. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by path analysis.Results: STI was directly increased by unsafe sexual behavior (b= 2.03; 95% CI= 1.15 to 2.91; p<0.001), older age (b= 1.83; 95% CI= 0.58 to 3.09; p= 0.004), multiple sexual partners (b= 2.28; 95% CI= 1.33 to 3.23; p<0.001). It was indirectly affected by intention, attitude, perceived behavior control, subjective norm, and education.Conclusion: STI is directly increased by sexual behavior, age, multiple sexual partners. It is indirectly affected by intention, attitude, perceived behavior control, subjective norm, and education.Keywords: sexually transmitted infections, sexual behavior, men who have sex with menCorrespondence: Siti Nurhalimah. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret. Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java, Indonesia. Email: halimah1006.mdf@gmail.com. Mobile: 082233890866. Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(3): 199-211https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.03.07
Low Birth, Prematurity, and Pre-Eclampsia as Risk Factors of Neonatal Asphyxia Kusumaningrum, Remita Yuli; Murti, Bhisma; Prasetya, Hanung
Journal of Maternal and Child Health Vol 4, No 1 (2019)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Background: Asphyxia neonatorum is the condition of an infant who does not breathe spontaneously and regularly immediately after birth. This condition is accompanied by hypoxia, hypercapnia, and ends with acidosis. Long-standing asphyxia can cause brain damage and death. This study aimed to investigate risk factors of asphyxia in Nganjuk Hospital, East Java.Subjects and Method: This was an analytic observational study with a case control design. The study was conducted in Nganjuk Hospital, East Java, in July 2018. A total sample of 150 neonates was selected by fixed disease sampling, consisting of 50 neonates with asphyxia and 1oo neonates without asphyxia. The dependent variable was asphyxia. The independent variables were low birth weight, preterm birth, and pre eclampsia. The data were obtained from medical record and analyzed by a multiple logistic regression.Results: The risk of asphyxia increased with low birth weight (OR= 2.58; 95% CI = 3.80 to 46.15; p<0.001), premature birth (OR= 1.27; 95% CI= 1.23 to 10.25; p= 0.019), and pre-eclampsia (OR= 3.74; 95% CI= 12.54 to 141.05; p <0.001).Conclusions: The risk of asphyxia increases with low birth weight, premature birth, and pre-eclampsia.Keywords: asphyxia, neonates, low birth weight, premature, preeclampsiaCorrespondence:Remita Yuli Kusumaningrum. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret. Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: renita.yuli@gmail.com. Mobile: +6281231871222.Journal of Maternal and Child Health (2019), 4(1): 49-54https://doi.org/10.26911/thejmch.2019.04.01.07
Theory of Planned Behavior on the Determinants of Cosmetic Hormones Use to Overcome Gender Dysphoria among Transgenders in Yogyakarta, Indonesia Miden, Destinady Kadiser; Prasetya, Hanung; Murti, Bhisma
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior Vol 3, No 3 (2018)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Background: Gender dysphoria refers to discomfort or distress that is caused by a discrepancy between an individual’s gender identity and the gender assigned at birth (and the associated gender role and/or primary and secondary sex characteristics). Gender reassignment surgery is performed to change primary and/or secondary sex characteristics. For a male to female gender reassignment, surgical procedures may include genital reconstruction (vaginoplasty, penectomy, orchidectomy, clitoroplasty) and cosmetic surgery (breast implants, facial reshaping, rhinoplasty, abdominoplasty, thyroid chondroplasty (laryngeal shaving), voice modification surgery (vocal cord shortening), hair transplants). This study aimed to examine the determinants of cosmetic hormones among transgender in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, using Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB).Subjects and Method: This was a cross-sectional study carried out in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, in November 2018. A sample of 201 transgender was selected by snowball sampling and fixed disease sampling, consisting of 67 transgender using cosmetic hormone and 134 transgender not using the cosmetic hormone. The dependent variable was the use of cosmetic hormones. The independent variables were age, knowledge, education, intention, attitude, perceived behavioral control, and subjective norm. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by path analysis.Results: Cosmetic hormone use was directly increased by strong intention (b= 1.65; 95% CI= 0.98 to 2.31; p<0.001), positive attitude (b= 1.15; 95% CI= 0.48 to 1.81; p= 0.001), but decreased by strong perceived behavioral control not to use cosmetic hormone (b= -1.02; 95% CI= -1.70 to -0.34; p=0.003). Cosmetic hormone use was indirectly affected by age, education, locus of control, attitude, perceived behavioral control, subjective norm, and social norm.Conclusion: Cosmetic hormone use is directly increased by strong intention, positive attitude, but decreased by strong perceived behavioral control not to use the cosmetic hormone. Cosmetic hormone use is indirectly affected by age, education, the locus of control, attitude, perceived behavioral control, subjective norm, and social norm.Keywords: cosmetic hormone, transgender, Theory of Planned BehaviorCorrespondence: Destinady Kadiser Miden. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret. Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: destinady.kmiden@gmail.com. Mobile: 085328999232.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2018), 3(3): 212-222https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.03.08 
Factors Affecting Maternal Birth Preparedness: Evidence from Salatiga, Cental Java Yuliana, Ana; Murti, Bhisma; Prasetya, Hanung
Journal of Maternal and Child Health Vol 4, No 1 (2019)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Background: Maternal unpreparedness in facing childbirth is one of the factors causing the high maternal mortality rate (AKI). To support efforts to accelerate the reduction of MMR, preparation of childbirth is an important matter that must be improved. Pregnant women class is an activity to prepare the mother physically and psychologically in facing the delivery. The purpose of this study was to determine the factors that influence preparation for childbirth in pregnant women, including: the role of midwives, motivation of pregnant women and utilization of pregnant classes.Subjects and Method: This was an analytic observational study with a cross sectional design. The study was conducted in 6 community health centers in Salatiga, from June to July 2018. A sample of 120 mothers was selected by total sampling. The dependent variable was birth preparation. The independent variables were motivation, midwife role, and utilization of pregnant class. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by a multiple linear regression.Results: Birth preparedness was increased with strong midwife role (b= 2.82; 95% CI= -0.45 to 5.68; p= o.054), strong motivation (b= 4.12; 95% CI= 0.97 to 7.27; p= 0.011), and utilization of pregnant class (b= 3.90; 95% CI= 0.66 to 7.13; p= 0.019).Conclusions: Birth preparedness is increased with strong midwife role, strong motivation, and utilization of pregnant class.Keywords: birth preparedness, motivation, midwife role, pregnancy class, pregnant womenCorrespondence:Ana Yuliana. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: aishabilqisnugroho@gmail.com. Mobile: +62139321543.Journal of Maternal and Child Health (2019), 4(1): 55-61https://doi.org/10.26911/thejmch.2019.04.01.08
Determinants of Mobile Voluntary Counselling and Testing of HIV Use among Gay in Surakarta, Central Java Nindiyastuti, Nadia Ayu Irma; Prasetya, Hanung; Murti, Bhisma
Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior Vol 3, No 3 (2018)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Background: HIV infection remains a major global health problem, especially among bisexuals, men who have sex with men (MSM), and homosexuals. The number of AIDS patients in Indonesia from January to March 2017 was 673 people, the number of HIV infections was 10,376 people, and number of AIDS death was 61 people. The purpose of this study was to analyze the determinants of the use of mobile VCT of HIV in MSM community in Surakarta, Central Java.Subjects and Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Surakarta, Central Java, from October to November 2018. A sample of 200 MSM was selected by fixed disease sampling, including 50 MSM who used mobile VCT service and 150 MSM who did not use mobile VCT service. The dependent variable was mobile VCT of HIV use. The independent variables were intention, attitude, cues to action, perceived benefit, perceived barrier, and perceived susceptibility. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by path analysis.Results: Mobile VCT of HIV use was directly and positively affected by intention (b= 1.67; 95% CI= 0.73 to 2.56; p<0.001), attitude (b= 1.47; 95% CI= 0.43 to 2.52; p= 0.006), cues to action (b= 1.22; 95% CI= 0.29 to 2.14; p= 0.009), and perceived benefit (b= 1.99; 95% CI= 1.04 to 2.95; p<0.001). It was negatively affected by perceived barrier (b= -1.58; 95% CI= -2.49 to -0.67; p= 0.001). Mobile VCT use was indirectly affected by cues to action, perceived seriousness, and perceived susceptibility.Conclusion: Mobile VCT of HIV use is directly and positively affected by intention, attitude, cues to action, and perceived benefit, but is negatively affected by perceived barrier.Keywords: mobile VCT use, HIV infection, determinants, men who have sex with men, Health Belief ModelCorrespondence: Nadia Ayu Irma Nindiyastuti. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret. Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36A, Surakarta, Central Java 57216. Email: nadiaayu21051992@gmail.com.Mobile: 081252097440.Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2019), 3(3): 155-165https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2018.03.03.03
Multilevel Analysis on the Determinants of Antenatal Care Visit at Community Health Center in Madiun, East Java Purbaningrum, Sinta Ayu; Qadrijati, Isna; Adriani, Rita Benya; Prasetya, Hanung
Journal of Maternal and Child Health Vol 4, No 3 (2019)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Background: Antenatal care (ANC) is an important determinant of high maternal mortality rate and one of the basic components of maternal care. However, some pregnant women still had low awareness about the importance of ANC. The purpose of this study was to examine determinants of ANC visit in community health center, Madiun, East Java, and to determine the contextual effect of the community health center on the ANC visit.Subjects and Method: This was a case-control study conducted in Madiun, East Java, from November to December 2018. A sample of 200 pregnant women was selected by simple random sampling. The dependent variable was ANC visit. The independent variables were knowledge, occupation, number of children, attitude, income, and husband support. The data were collected by questionnaires and analyzed by a multilevel linear regression.Results: The likelihood of ANC visit increased with employment status (b= 1.97; 95% CI= 0.81 to 3.13; p= 0.001), good knowledge (b= 1.56; 95% CI= 0.41 to 2.72; p= 0.008), positive attitude (b= 1.74; 95% CI= 0.52 to 2.96; p= 0.005), higher family income (b= 1.42; 95% CI= 0.29 to 2.55; p= 0.014), and stronger husband support (b= 1.29; 95% CI= 0.16 to 2.43; p= 0.260). ANC visit decreased with larger number of children (b= -1.05; 95% CI= -2.17 to 0.07; p= 0.067). Community health center had strong contextual effect on ANC visit in pregnant women with ICC= 41.85%.Conclusion: ANC visit increases with employment status, good knowledge, positive attitude, high family income, and strong husband support. ANC visit decreases with large number of children. Community health center has strong contextual effect on ANC visit in pregnant women.Keywords: antenatal care, determinants, pregnant womenCorrespondence: Sinta Ayu Purbaningrum, Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Surakarta, Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36A, 57126, Surakarta, Central Java. Email: shintayuu@gmail.com. Mobile: +6282220100192. Journal of Maternal and Child Health 2019, 4(3), 180-189https://doi.org/10.26911/thejmch.2019.04.03.05