Chang, Young Jin
Pusat Penelitian dan Pengembangan Perikanan, Badan Penelitian dan Pengembangan Kelautan da

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LOW WATER TEMPERATURE AND ITS EFFECTS ON STRESS RESPONSE OF GREY MULLETS Mugil cephalus ACCLIMATED IN FRESHWATER Prakoso, Vitas Atmadi; Subagja, Jojo; Chang, Young Jin
Indonesian Aquaculture Journal Vol 10, No 1 (2015): (June 2015)
Publisher : Pusat Penelitian dan Pengembangan Perikanan, Badan Penelitian dan Pengembangan Kelautan da

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (71.582 KB) | DOI: 10.15578/iaj.10.1.2015.41-45

Abstract

Grey mullet (Mugil cephalus) can adapt to saline and freshwater. Although belonged to euryhaline species, but information regarding their stress response on low temperature. Environmental disturbance such as low water temperature may effect their physiological condition. These information can be useful for aquaculture development of this species in freshwater. Therefore, the purpose of study was to investigate the effects of low water temperature on the stress response of grey mullets Mugil cephalus acclimated in freshwater. The blood samples of experimental fish (TL: 28.2±1.1 cm, BW: 198.6±25.9 g) were collected during winter season when the water temperature of controlled rearing system was stable at 25°C and uncontrolled rearing system slowly dropped until 12°C. Their stress response on both rearing systems was observed. The results showed that low temperature affected to lower the behavior activity and increase the stress response of grey mullets. The breath frequency of grey mullet regarding their opercular movement at 12°C was 74-97 breath/min., while at 25°C it was 95-114 breath/min. Hematocrit (Ht) and hemoglobin (Hb) were shown higher values of 43.5% and 9.5 g/dL, respectively at 25°C than 12°C (28.0% and 7.1 g/dL, respectively). The tendencies of cortisol and glucose level increased with the lowering temperature, showing higher value of 264.8 ng/mL and 35.5 mg/dL in 12°C than 5.5 ng/mL and 32.7 mg/dL in 25°C. The chemical properties of blood in grey mullets showed same tendency comparing between 12°C and 25°C, there was no significant different between each temperature, except for chloride (P<0.05). Chloride value was higher at 25°C, while other blood components such as osmolality, sodium, potassium, and magnesium were showing no significant differences. However, the results showed lower values at 12°C in every blood components, except for chloride. In conclusion, lowering water temperature to 12°C had impact as stressor to the behavior and stress response of grey mullets acclimated in freshwater.
METABOLIC RATES (SMR, RMR, AMR, AND MMR) OF Oplegnathus fasciatus ON DIFFERENT TEMPERATURE AND SALINITY SETTINGS Prakoso, Vitas Atmadi; Chang, Young Jin
Indonesian Aquaculture Journal Vol 13, No 1 (2018): (June, 2018)
Publisher : Pusat Penelitian dan Pengembangan Perikanan, Badan Penelitian dan Pengembangan Kelautan da

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (120.67 KB) | DOI: 10.15578/iaj.13.1.2018.23-29

Abstract

The metabolic rate of aquatic animals is closely related to oxygen concentration and influenced by internal and external factors. Despite its high value as marine fish species in South Korea, information on rock bream Oplegnathus fasciatus metabolism is scarcely available. This study observed the standard metabolic rate (SMR), routine metabolic rate (RMR), and active metabolic rate (AMR) of rock bream Oplegnathus fasciatus subjected to different temperature settings. Another observation was performed to find out the maximum metabolic rate (MMR) on rock bream subjected to different salinity settings. Fish (TL: 26.86 ± 0.29 cm and BW: 469.40 ± 38.21 g for SMR, RMR, and AMR measurement; TL: 26.7 ± 0.4 cm and BW: 451.0 ± 44.4 g for MMR measurement) were observed using respirometer (dimension = 30 cm × 20 cm × 20 cm; volume: 10.4 L) inside a recirculation systems. SMR, RMR, and AMR were measured at 15°C, 20°C, and 25°C. Meanwhile, MMR was measured at 15, 25, and 35 psu. The results showed that SMR, RMR, and AMR increased linearly by increasing the temperatures (SMR: 58.7 ± 3.2, 102.7 ± 4.3, and 157.1 ± 4.1 mg O2/kg/h at 15°C, 20°C, and 25°C, respectively; RMR: 66.0 ± 8.6, 112.6 ± 10.2, and 175.2 ± 21.3 mg O2/kg/h at 15°C, 20°C, and 25°C, respectively; AMR: 73.4 ± 7.4, 122.0 ± 6.3, and 196.7 ± 15.4 mg O2/kg/h at 15°C, 20°C, and 25°C, respectively), whilst MMR decreased by lowering salinity (48.5 ± 5.2, 61.1 ± 5.5, and 89.3 ± 14.7 mg O2/kg/hour at salinity of 15, 25, and 35 psu, respectively).
EFFECTS OF SALINITY ON OXYGEN CONSUMPTION AND BLOOD PROPERTIES OF YOUNG GREY MULLETS Mugil cephalus Prakoso, Vitas Atmadi; Kim, Ki Tae; Min, Byung Hwa; Gustiano, Rudhy; Chang, Young Jin
Indonesian Aquaculture Journal Vol 10, No 2 (2015): (December 2015)
Publisher : Pusat Penelitian dan Pengembangan Perikanan, Badan Penelitian dan Pengembangan Kelautan da

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.15578/iaj.10.2.2015.143-153

Abstract

Oxygen consumption (OC) is one of important factors in aquaculture activities, as the oxygen is a vital condition for all the organisms living in the water and having an aerobic type of respiration. OC is the preferred method for measuring and reporting the metabolic rate in fish. The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of salinity on OC and blood properties of grey mullets. Five experimental groups were conducted to measure OC and blood properties of grey mullets Mugil cephalus (BW: 187.9 ± 45.8 g) according to salinity (30→0 psu, 0→30 psu) changes; SDS: fish reared in seawater (SW, 30 psu) directly shifted to SW, SGF: SW fish gradually shifted to freshwater (FW, 0 psu), SDF: SW fish directly shifted to FW, FDF: FW fish directly shifted to FW, and FDS: FW fish directly shifted to SW. The result showed that OC tended to decrease in the groups of SW fish shifted to FW showing 194.5 mg O2/kg/h at 25°C in SDS to 82.4 mg O2/kg/h at 15°C in SGF. On the contrary, OC increased in the groups of FW fish shifted to SW showing 80.5 mg O2/kg/h at 15°C in FDF to 184.0 mg O2/kg/h at 25°C in FDS. Cortisol levels at the end of experiments were rapidly increased with the lowering salinities in SW fish shifted to FW showing 20.6 ng/mL in SDS to 316.2 ng/mL in SDF, while those were decreased with the increasing salinities in FW fish shifted to SW showing 40.2 ng/mL in FDF to 10.3 ng/mL in FDS. However, glucose levels showed no significant differences among all experimental groups. Based on the information from this study, aquaculture of grey mullet might be applied or developed in freshwater due to its osmotic adaptation ability.
EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT SALINITY LEVELS ON PHYSIOLOGICAL AND HEMATOLOGICAL RESPONSE OF ROCK BREAM Oplegnathus fasciatus Prakoso, Vitas Atmadi; Ryu, Jun Hyung; Min, Byung Hwa; Gustiano, Rudhy; Chang, Young Jin
Indonesian Aquaculture Journal Vol 11, No 2 (2016): (December, 2016)
Publisher : Pusat Penelitian dan Pengembangan Perikanan, Badan Penelitian dan Pengembangan Kelautan da

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (594.335 KB) | DOI: 10.15578/iaj.11.2.2016.75-79

Abstract

Rock bream Oplegnathus fasciatus is one of economically important marine fish species in East Asia. However, lack of information about the salinity tolerance of rock bream related to its physiological response made this issue were needed to be studied. The present study was conducted to determine the effects of different salinity levels on physiological and hematological response of rock bream in order to obtain its salinity tolerance. Twelve rock breams (total length: 26.9 ± 0.6 cm, body weight: 477.3 ± 61.9 g) were used for experiments. Four experimental groups with three replications were conducted to measure the effects of salinity (5, 15, 25, and 35 practical salinity unit (psu)) on physiological and hematological response of rock bream. Fish were stocked into the chamber inside the closed recirculation system. At the end of each experiment, blood samples were collected. The study revealed that lower salinity exposure had tendency to decrease the physical and chemical properties of blood in rock bream. The value of Na+, Cl-, Ca, Mg, and osmolality showed tendency to decrease with lowering salinity, while cortisol and glucose showed tendency to increase from 35 psu to low salinity environment, indicating the enhancement of fish stress and resulted in fish mortality at 5 psu. The lowest cortisol value was 76.3 ng/mL in 25 psu, and the highest value was 188.8 ng/mL in 5 psu. Meanwhile, the lowest glucose value was 35.3 mg/dL and the highest value was 166.7 mg/dL (P<0.05). Results indicate that rock bream could tolerate lower salinity up to 15 psu.