Dsikowitzky, Larissa
Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

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Potential Risk of Organic Contaminants to The Coastal Population Through Seafood Consumption from Jakarta Bay Dwiyitno, Dwiyitno; Andarwulan, Nuri; Irianto, Hari Eko; Lioe, Hanifah Nuryani; Dsikowitzky, Larissa; Ariyani, Farida; Schwarzbauer, Jan
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 12, No 3 (2017): December 2017
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1152.486 KB) | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v12i3.289

Abstract

A comprehensive study on exposure assessment of the priority organic contaminants via seafood consumption has been conducted to the coastal population of Jakarta Bay. Seafood is essential food source in Indonesia and also important income for the majority of coastal populations. A number of 152 respondents from 4 districts surounding the bay were interviewed to record their frequency and pattern on seafood consumption. In the same time, 13 seafood species were collected directly from Jakarta Bay during the dry and wet seasons for the assessment of organic contaminants. A non-target GC/MS screening identified more than 40 organic contaminants in which 6 of them are potentially considered as priority contaminants including 3 groups of carcinogenic contaminants i.e. dichlorodiphenyl-trichlorethane (DDT) and its metabolites (DDXs), dichlorobenzenes (DCB) and carcinogenic PAHs (PAH4). Further exposure analysis suggested cumulative health risk of these contaminants was less than official minimal risk level (MRL) and therefore categorized safe for the corresponding population. However, attention must be paid since additional exposure of either from the different food category or other exposure route may contribute to significantly elevate the health risk on the population as well as potential exposure of emerging contaminants.
Non-Target Screening Method for the Identification of Persistent and Emerging Organic Contaminants in Seafood and Sediment from Jakarta Bay Dwiyitno, Dwiyitno; Dsikowitzky, Larissa; Andarwulan, Nuri; Irianto, Hari Eko; Lioe, Hanifah Nuryani; Ariyani, Farida; Schwarzbauer, Jan
Squalen, Buletin Pascapanen dan Bioteknologi Kelautan dan Perikanan Vol 10, No 3 (2015): December 2015
Publisher : Research and Development Center for Marine and Fisheries Product Processing and Biotechnol

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (1276.309 KB) | DOI: 10.15578/squalen.v10i3.175

Abstract

Identification of persistent and emerging organic contaminants in green mussels (Perna viridis), various fishes, banana shrimp (Penaeus merguiensis) and sediment samples from Jakarta Bay has been employed. A non-target GC-MS screening approach has identified more than 60 individual organic compounds from the whole fractions either non-polar, semi-polar or acidic-polar compounds. The substances comprised as persistent organic pollutants (POPs) including DDT (dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane) and its metabolites as well as high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs). Noteworthy, a number of emerging contaminants detected in the present study have never been reported previously either from the same location or from Asian waters. They include some priority contaminants of non-persistence halogens and emission of technical products, such as di-iso-propylnaphthalenes (DIPNs) dichlorobenzene (DCB), dichlorodiphenyl chloroethene (DDMU) and phenylmethoxynaphthalene (PMN). In general, the concentration order of the priority organic contaminants was sediment > green mussel > fishes > shrimp. Further analysis based on the spatial distribution, individual concentrations and bioavailability suggested that some contaminants are applicable as molecular marker for the assessment of anthropogenic emission in Jakarta Bay, i.e. DIPNs, linear alkylbenzenes (LABs), phenylmethoxynaphthalene (PMN), PAHs, dichlorobenzene, DDT and its metabolites.