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Heru Santoso Wahito Nugroho, Heru Santoso Wahito
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Published : 4 Documents
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Understanding the Resistance to Health Information Systems

Health Notions Vol 1, No 1 (2017): January-March
Publisher : Humanistic Network for Science and Technology (HNST)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (153.486 KB)

Abstract

User resistance is users’ opposition to system implementation. Resistance often occurs as a result of a mismatch between management goals and employee preferences. There are two types of resistance to health iformation system namely active resistance and passive resistance. The manifestation of active resistance are being critical,  blaming/accusing, blocking, fault finding, sabotaging, undermining, ridiculing, intimidating/threatening, starting rumors, appealing to fear, manipulating arguing, using facts selectively, distorting facts and  raising objections. The manifestation of passive resistance are agreeing verbally but not following through, failing to implement change, procrastinating/dragging feet, feigning ignorance, withholding information, suggestions, help or support, and standing by and allowing the change to fail.   Keywords: Health information systems, User Resistance, Active resistance, Passive resistance 

Community Empowerment Model Based on Independence in Administration Alert Village Health Sector

Health Notions Vol 2 No 2 (2018): February 2018
Publisher : Humanistic Network for Science and Technology (Address: Cemara street 25, Ds/Kec Sukorejo, Ponorogo, East Java, Indonesia 63453)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (265.059 KB)

Abstract

Introduction: The success of “Alert villages” (“alert village”) can be explained using an independence-based "community empowerment model", involving factors of physical capital, human capital, social capital and community empoweredness. Method: This model was developed with a cros sectional design involving physical capital, human capital, social capital, community empoweredness, and “alert village” success. The research subjects were 216 implementers of “alert village” in Panekan Sub-district, Magetan District, selected by cluster sampling technique. Data were collected through questionnaires, then analyzed using structural equation modeling based on partial least square. Result: The success of “alert village” wass influenced by: 1) physical capital with total effect of 0.105360; 2) social capital with total effect 0.774022, 3) community empoweredness with total effect 0.952891. Analysis: The success of “alert village” was determined by a direct determinant of community empoweredness and two indirect determinants of physical capital and social capital. Discussion: In the model of community empowerment in the implementation of “alert village” in Panekan Sub-district, the success of “alert village” was determined by 2 main factors in sequence, namely: 1) community empoweredness that included the ability to identify and develop potential, identify and prioritize problems, solve the problem; 2) social capital that included social network, level of trust between people, obedience to norm, caring for others, and involvement in implementation.

Understanding The Resistance to Health Information Systems

Health Notions Vol 1 No 1 (2017): January-March 2017
Publisher : Humanistic Network for Science and Technology (Address: Cemara street 25, Ds/Kec Sukorejo, Ponorogo, East Java, Indonesia 63453)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (153.486 KB)

Abstract

User resistance is users’ opposition to system implementation. Resistance often occurs as a result of a mismatch between management goals and employee preferences. There are two types of resistance to health iformation system namely active resistance and passive resistance. The manifestation of active resistance are being critical,  blaming/accusing, blocking, fault finding, sabotaging, undermining, ridiculing, intimidating/threatening, starting rumors, appealing to fear, manipulating arguing, using facts selectively, distorting facts and  raising objections. The manifestation of passive resistance are agreeing verbally but not following through, failing to implement change, procrastinating/dragging feet, feigning ignorance, withholding information, suggestions, help or support, and standing by and allowing the change to fail.

Community Empowerment Model Based on Independence in Administration Alert Village Health Sector

Health Notions Vol 2, No 2 (2018): February
Publisher : Humanistic Network for Science and Technology (HNST)

Show Abstract | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (265.059 KB)

Abstract

Introduction: The success of “Alert villages” (“alert village”) can be explained using an independence-based "community empowerment model", involving factors of physical capital, human capital, social capital and community empoweredness. Method: This model was developed with a cros sectional design involving physical capital, human capital, social capital, community empoweredness, and “alert village” success. The research subjects were 216 implementers of “alert village” in Panekan Sub-district, Magetan District, selected by cluster sampling technique. Data were collected through questionnaires, then analyzed using structural equation modeling based on partial least square. Result: The success of “alert village” wass influenced by: 1) physical capital with total effect of 0.105360; 2) social capital with total effect 0.774022, 3) community empoweredness with total effect 0.952891. Analysis: The success of “alert village” was determined by a direct determinant of community empoweredness and two indirect determinants of physical capital and social capital. Discussion: In the model of community empowerment in the implementation of “alert village” in Panekan Sub-district, the success of “alert village” was determined by 2 main factors in sequence, namely: 1) community empoweredness that included the ability to identify and develop potential, identify and prioritize problems, solve the problem; 2) social capital that included social network, level of trust between people, obedience to norm, caring for others, and involvement in implementation. Keywords: Physical capital, Social capital, Community empoweredness, Alert village