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PPAR-gamma Signaling in Metabolic Homeostasis Triana, Rina; Dewi, Nurrani Mustika; Darmayanti, Siska; Herawati, Eka; Novalentina, Maria; Semadhi, Made Putra; Rahman, Miftakh Nur
The Indonesian Biomedical Journal Vol 8, No 3 (2016)
Publisher : The Prodia Education and Research Institute (PERI)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.18585/inabj.v8i3.209

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, or also known as nuclear receptor subfamily 1 group C member 3 (NR1C3), is a PPAR which serves as master regulator of adipocytes differentiation, and plays an important role in lipid metabolism or adipogenesis. Recent study showed that PPAR-γ is expressed in most tissue and also has critical impact in many metabolic homeostasis disorders.CONTENT: Dysregulation of PPAR-γ is correlated to the development of obesity, type 2 diabetes, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, acute kidney injury, autoimmune disease, gastrointestinal disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Abundant number of new emerging compounds, with in vitro and in vivo effectiveness as natural and synthetic agonists of PPARs, are investigated, developed and used as the treatment of metabolic disorders of glucose and/or lipid and other diseases.SUMMARY: Based on all studies explanation, targeting PPAR-γ is proven to be a good therapeutic method for reducing negative effect of several metabolic homeostasis disorder. Now, many natural and synthetic agonists of PPARs are used as the treatment of metabolic disorders of glucose and/or lipid or another metabolic homeostasis disorder. Such agonists have different properties and specificities for individual PPARs receptors, different absorption and distribution, and distinctive gene expression profiles, which ultimately lead to different clinical outcomes.KEYWORDS: PPAR-γ, dysregulation, agonist, adipogenesis, metabolic disorder, homeostasis
Is Stem Cell a Curer or an Obstruction? Darmayanti, Siska; Triana, Rina; Chouw, Angliana; Dewi, Nurrani Mustika
Molecular and Cellular Biomedical Sciences Vol 1, No 1 (2017)
Publisher : Cell and BioPharmaceutical Institute

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.21705/mcbs.v1i1.12

Abstract

Stem cell research and therapy are progressing these days dramatically. Stem cell therapy holds enormous treatment potential for many diseases which currently have no or limited therapeutic options. Unfortunately, this potential also comes with side-effects. In this review, the positive and negative effects of regulation of stem cells will be explained. Stem cells are undifferentiated cells which able to develop into many different cells of types in the body during early life and growth. There are five types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, somatic stem cells, fetal stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells. Stem cell transplantation is one form of stem cell therapy, it comes with different techniques sourced, and those are autologous and allogeneic transplantation stem cells. In an autologous transplant, a patients blood-forming stem cells are collected, meanwhile, in an allogeneic transplant, target cells are replaced with new stem cells obtained from a donor or donated umbilical cord blood. Its abilities to maintain the phenotype, self-renewing and differentiate itself into specialized cells, give rise to stem cell as an innovation for the treatment of various diseases. In the clinical setting, stem cells are being explored for different conditions, such as in tissue repair and regeneration and autoimmune diseases therapy. But along with its benefit, stem cell therapy also holds some harm. It is known that the treatment using stem cell for curing and rehabilitation has the risk of tumor formation.Keywords: stem cell, therapy, transplantation, tumorigenic, mesenchymal stem cell, allogeneic
Is Stem Cell a Curer or an Obstruction? Darmayanti, Siska; Triana, Rina; Chouw, Angliana; Dewi, Nurrani Mustika
Molecular and Cellular Biomedical Sciences Vol 1, No 1 (2017)
Publisher : Cell and BioPharmaceutical Institute

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.21705/mcbs.v1i1.12

Abstract

Stem cell research and therapy are progressing these days dramatically. Stem cell therapy holds enormous treatment potential for many diseases which currently have no or limited therapeutic options. Unfortunately, this potential also comes with side-effects. In this review, the positive and negative effects of regulation of stem cells will be explained. Stem cells are undifferentiated cells which able to develop into many different cells of types in the body during early life and growth. There are five types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, somatic stem cells, fetal stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells. Stem cell transplantation is one form of stem cell therapy, it comes with different techniques sourced, and those are autologous and allogeneic transplantation stem cells. In an autologous transplant, a patients blood-forming stem cells are collected, meanwhile, in an allogeneic transplant, target cells are replaced with new stem cells obtained from a donor or donated umbilical cord blood. Its abilities to maintain the phenotype, self-renewing and differentiate itself into specialized cells, give rise to stem cell as an innovation for the treatment of various diseases. In the clinical setting, stem cells are being explored for different conditions, such as in tissue repair and regeneration and autoimmune diseases therapy. But along with its benefit, stem cell therapy also holds some harm. It is known that the treatment using stem cell for curing and rehabilitation has the risk of tumor formation.Keywords: stem cell, therapy, transplantation, tumorigenic, mesenchymal stem cell, allogeneic
Ischemic Stroke: New Neuron Recovery Approach with Mesenchymal and Neural Stem Cells Chouw, Angliana; Triana, Rina; Dewi, Nurrani Mustika; Darmayanti, Siska; Rahman, Miftakh Nur; Susanto, Ardian; Putera, Bayu Winata; Sartika, Cynthia Retna
Molecular and Cellular Biomedical Sciences Vol 2, No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Cell and BioPharmaceutical Institute

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.21705/mcbs.v2i2.28

Abstract

Stroke is a leading cause of death and long-term disability. This due to the ischemic event that cause by embolism of blockage blood flow. Thrombolytic agent plasminogen activator (tPA) is the only treatment approved by FDA. However, the used of tPA is limited to the short time window period. Neural stem cells (NSCs) show the potential to repair neuronal damage naturally after stroke. However, isolating NSCs is a challenging process due to the limitations of the method and its invasiveness. Some studies that had used mesenchymal stem cell (MSCs) as the main source of stem cell for therapy show that MSCs have the potency to differentiate into NSCs. in vitro, a differentiation process from MSC to NSC has been developed by combining the supplement or growth factor needed in the culture media.Keywords: stem cells, neuron stem cell, mesenchymal stem cell, stroke, trans-differentiation
Relationship between Circulating Protein p53 and High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Central Obesity Men with Inflammaging Triana, Rina; Meiliana, Anna; Halimah, Eli; Wijaya, Andi
The Indonesian Biomedical Journal Vol 11, No 1 (2019)
Publisher : The Prodia Education and Research Institute (PERI)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.18585/inabj.v11i1.436

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The mechanism of aging goes along with age, one of which is characterized by cellular senescent, which occurs mostly in adipose tissue. Adipose tissue is the site of accumulation of large cell senescent, in the regulation of obesity and aging. Proteins p53 is marker for cell senescent, which are also known to induce inflammation. This study was aimed to determine the relationship between circulating protein p53 and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in central obese men with inflammaging.METHODS: The study design is an observational study with cross-sectional approach. The subjects were 75 central obese men (waist circumference/WC > 90 cm), aged ≥ 45 years old. Subjects were divided into 2 age groups, those are middle age group: 45-59 years old (50.7%) and elderly group: ≥ 60 years old (49.3%). Examination of circulating p53 was done using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method, and the hsCRP examination was done by chemiluminescent method.RESULTS: It was found that there was a correlation between circulating p53 and hsCRP in elderly (r=-0.414; p<0.05) but not in middle age (r=-0.127; p=0.449).CONCLUSION: From this study, it is assumed that more senescence cells in elderly are resulting in increased chronic inflammation.KEYWORDS: aging, senescent, inflammaging, protein p53, hsCRP