Juniar Sirait
Loka Penelitian Kambing Potong Sei Putih P.O. Box 1, Galang 20585

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Dwarf Elephant Grass (Pennisetum purpureum cv. Mott) as Forage for Ruminant Sirait, Juniar
WARTAZOA. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 27, No 4 (2017): December 2017
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (274.511 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/wartazoa.v27i4.1569

Abstract

Availability of good quality forage is limited during dry season. Dwarf elephant grass is one of alternatives in providing high productivity and quality of forage. This paper aims to inform morphologhy characteristics, feed quality, and post harvest of dwarf elephant grass. Dwarf elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum cv. Mott) has different morphology from common elephant grass (P. purpureum). It has several advantages compared to common elephant grass in term of faster growth and regrowth rates, high of leaf and stem ratio, protein content, and dry matter production. This grass is suitable for grazing and cut and carry system. This grass is also suitable for ruminant feed as silage or hay. Processing of dwarf elephant grass using fermentation technology is recommended during over production period, for further use during drought and limited forage availability.
The Potency and Utilization of Cassava and Sweet Potato Leaves as Feed Resources for Small Ruminant Sirait, Juniar; Simanihuruk, K
WARTAZOA. Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 2 (2010): JUNE 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (84.371 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/wartazoa.v20i2.940

Abstract

Cassava and sweet potato leaves are agricultural byproducts which are potential to be utilized as feed for small ruminants. In year 2009, it is assumed that dry matter productions of cassava and sweet potato leaves are 2,590,929 and 348,008 tons, respectively. Cassava and sweet potato leaves, both contain high level of protein (> 20%) so that they are good protein sources for goats. Cassava leaves, however, contain cyanide acid (HCN) that varied depended on the age and require wilting process before fed to goat. Several experiments on utilization of cassava or sweet potato leaves for small ruminants showed positive responses on animal performance and could replace 50% of concentrate feed. Besides, cassava leaves can reduce worm eggs while sweet potato leaves contain high lutein. At present, the development of cassava and sweet potato is expected to provide feed as byproduct for ruminant. Key words: Cassava, sweet potato, feed resource, ruminant
PENGGUNAAN SILASE BIOMASSA TANAMAN UBI KAYU (KULIT UMBI, BATANG, DAN DAUN) SEBAGAI PAKAN KAMBING PERANAKAN ETAWAH (PE) Simanihuruk, Kiston; Sirait, Juniar; Syawal, Muhammad
Pastura : Jurnal Ilmu Tumbuhan Pakan Ternak Vol 2 No 2
Publisher : Udayana University

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (71.575 KB) | DOI: 10.24843/Pastura.2013.v02.i02.p06

Abstract

Cassava biomass (bark tubers, stems and leaves) is quite potential and need to be explored as feed component for goats. The research was carried out to determine the effect of cassava biomass silage as feed supplementation for growth of male Etawah crossbred post weaning. The experiment was using a completely randomized design (CRD) for 30 (thirty) male Etawah crossbreds post weaning (11-14 kg live weight). Technology of silage biomass cassava plant used 12% additives molasses. The feed treatment consists of: P0 = without giving silage biomass cassava plant, P1=750g/head/day of cassava biomass silage, and P2=1000 g/head/day of cassava biomass silage. These cassava silages were given to Etawah crossbred in the morning. The result showed that the chemical and physical characteristics of cassava silage biomass plant which was using 12% of molasses additives could be categorized significant. Statistical analysis showed that feeding silage crop cassava gave significant effect (P<0.05) to growth of male Etawah crossbred post weaning. The highest average growth was P2 = 53.71g/head /day. It can be concluded that silage technology could increase the period of saving cassava biomass and improved growth of countryside goats.
The Potency and Utilization of Cassava and Sweet Potato Leaves as Feed Resources for Small Ruminant Sirait, Juniar; Simanihuruk, K
Indonesian Bulletin of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 20, No 2 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (84.371 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/wartazoa.v20i2.940

Abstract

Cassava and sweet potato leaves are agricultural byproducts which are potential to be utilized as feed for small ruminants. In year 2009, it is assumed that dry matter productions of cassava and sweet potato leaves are 2,590,929 and 348,008 tons, respectively. Cassava and sweet potato leaves, both contain high level of protein (> 20%) so that they are good protein sources for goats. Cassava leaves, however, contain cyanide acid (HCN) that varied depended on the age and require wilting process before fed to goat. Several experiments on utilization of cassava or sweet potato leaves for small ruminants showed positive responses on animal performance and could replace 50% of concentrate feed. Besides, cassava leaves can reduce worm eggs while sweet potato leaves contain high lutein. At present, the development of cassava and sweet potato is expected to provide feed as byproduct for ruminant. Key words: Cassava, sweet potato, feed resource, ruminant
The utilization of alfalfa that planted at Tobasa highland, North Sumatra for growing Boerka goat feed Sirait, Juniar; Tarigan, A.; Simanihuruk, K.
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 16, No 4 (2011)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i4.626

Abstract

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is a herbaceus legume which is potential to be used as goat feed for it’s high production and nutritive value. This research was aimed to study the adaptation of alfalfa planted at highland-moderate climate and it’s utilization for goat feed. This research concists of two activities, ie 1) Agronomy of alfalfa that adapted to highland as a goat feed resource, and 2) The alfalfa usage technology as goat feed. On the first activity alfalfa was planted on highland-moderate climate Gurgur, Tobasa District, North Sumatra Province. Data was collected included: growth percentage, morphology and production aspects, and nutritive value. The harvesting was conducted for three times, where the first cutting had done at 100 days after planting. Investigation of morphology characterirtics was done before alfalfa harvesting. The utilization of alfalfa as goat feed was carried out on the second activity which was arranged in a completely randomized design. Twenty male Boer x Kacang crossbred  (Boerka) goats of 5-6 months of age with average body weight 14.2±0.8 kg were randomly assigned to four feed treatments where each treatment consited of five replications. The four feed treatments were: P1 = 100% grass + 0% alfalfa; P2 = 90% grass + 10% alfalfa, P3 = 80% grass + 20% alfalfa, and P4 = 70% grass + 30% alfalfa. Data observation included dry matter intake, average daily gain, feed efficiency, and income over feed cost. Results showed that alfalfa growth percentage was 65% with good growth and high either production or nutritive value. The average shoot dry matter production was 438.6 g/m2 which was equivalent to 26.3 t/ha/yr. The crude protein content of alfalfa on the first, second and third harvesting were 17.93; 21.89 and 17.73 per cent, respectively. The utilization of alfalfa that had been processed to be crude-meal can be applied as goat feed. Supplementation of 70% grass and 30% alfalfa meal showed the best results: ADG 59.17 g/d, feed efficiency 0.14, and IOFC Rp 736/h/d. Key Words: Alfalfa, Herbage, Production, Meal, Feed, Goat
The Utilization of Indigofera sp as the sole foliage in goat diets supplemented with high carbohydrate or high protein concentrates Ginting, Simon P; Krisnan, Rantan; Sirait, Juniar; ., Antonius
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 15, No 4 (2010)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i4.665

Abstract

Indigofera sp is a tree leguminous forage species known to be adaptable to the drought climate and saline soil and so it has potential as alternative feed resource to support the ruminant animal production. This study aimed to study the  responses of goats fed Indigofera sp as the sole foliages in their diets. Twenty male Boer x Kacang crossbred goats  (6 months of age;16 ± 2,1 kg BW) were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments containing fresh or wilted leaves of Indigifera sp. as the sole foliages and supplemented with high carbohydrate (HCC) or protein (HPC)concentrates. Consumable parts i.e. leaves and twigs of about 8 to 10 months of age of Indigofera sp. were harvested by hand plucking every day in the morning. The experiment was a 2 x 2 factorial design arranged in a completely randomized design. The ruminal pH ranged from 6.14-6.85 and were  not affected (P > 0.05) by wilting nor by the type of concentrates. Wilting did not affect (P > 0.05) the concentration of  ruminal NH3-N, but  it was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in HPC group (32.36-32.54 mg dL-1) than those in HCC group(17.94-23.57 mg dL-1). Total VFA concentration were not affected by wilting  nor by the type of concentrates  (P > 0.05). Goats in the HCC group,however,numerically have higher total VFA concentration (178.5-183.75 mmol L-1) than those in the HPC group (142.21-174.64 mmol L-1). The apparent digestibility coeficients  of DM, OM, CP and energy of the diet were not different (P > 0.05) when contained wilted or fresh Indigofera foliage.  Significant increases (P < 0.05)   in the DM and  OM, but not in the CP and energy  apparent digestibility coeficients were observed in the HPC goats. Dry matter intakes were not different (P > 0.05) among dietary treatments, but the ADG of goats in the HCC group (60-63 g d-1) were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those  of goats in the HPC treatment (80-87 g d-1). Blood glucosa concentration was not affected by wilting nor by type of concentrates (P > 0.05).  BUN was not affected by wilting process, but providing high protein concentrates significantly (P < 0.05) increased the BUN concentration. It is concluded that foliage of Indigofera sp could be used as the sole forage in intensive production of goats. Wilting the foliage prior to feeding seemed to be unnecessary, since this process does not improve the animal productivity in term of daily gain and efficiency of feed utilization. Key Words: Indigofera sp, Supplements,  Ruminal Fermentation, Goats
Leaf area, chlorophyll content, and relative growth rate of grass on different shading and fertilization Sirait, Juniar
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 2 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i2.603

Abstract

Plant morphology and physiology such as leaf area, total chlorophyll, and chlorophyll a/b ratio were affected by shading and fertilization. An experiment was conducted in Indonesian Research Institute for Animal Production (IRIAP) Ciawi, West Java. The objective of this study was to determine the morphology and physiology adaptation of three short grasses species for grazing namely Paspalum notatum, Brachiaria humidicola, Stenotaphrum secundatum on different shading and fertilization level. The experiment was arranged in split-split plot design. The main plot was shading level (0, 38, 56%); sub-plot was fertilizer dosage (0, 100, and 200 kg N/ha) while sub-sub plot was grass species. The results showed that leaf area were significantly different on different grass species, and there was interaction between shading and species on total leaf area. P. notatum on 38% shading level has the highest total leaf area (240.2 cm2). S. secundatum and P. notatum had a better adaptation in shading area compared to B. humidicola by increasing of total chlorophyll and decreasing of chlorophyll a/b ratio. Relative growth rate (RGR) of P. notatum and S. secundatum were increased by the increasing shading level. On the other hand relative growth rate of B. humidicola was decreased by the increasing  shading level. Leaf area, chlorophyll content, and RGR were not significantly affected by fertilization dosage. Key Words: Shading, Fertilization, Adaptation, Growth, Chlorophyll
The Utilization of Indigofera sp as the sole foliage in goat diets supplemented with high carbohydrate or high protein concentrates Ginting, Simon P; Krisnan, Rantan; Sirait, Juniar; ., Antonius
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 15, No 4 (2010): DECEMBER 2010
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (77.464 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v15i4.665

Abstract

Indigofera sp is a tree leguminous forage species known to be adaptable to the drought climate and saline soil and so it has potential as alternative feed resource to support the ruminant animal production. This study aimed to study the  responses of goats fed Indigofera sp as the sole foliages in their diets. Twenty male Boer x Kacang crossbred goats  (6 months of age;16 ± 2,1 kg BW) were randomly assigned to four dietary treatments containing fresh or wilted leaves of Indigifera sp. as the sole foliages and supplemented with high carbohydrate (HCC) or protein (HPC)concentrates. Consumable parts i.e. leaves and twigs of about 8 to 10 months of age of Indigofera sp. were harvested by hand plucking every day in the morning. The experiment was a 2 x 2 factorial design arranged in a completely randomized design. The ruminal pH ranged from 6.14-6.85 and were  not affected (P > 0.05) by wilting nor by the type of concentrates. Wilting did not affect (P > 0.05) the concentration of  ruminal NH3-N, but  it was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in HPC group (32.36-32.54 mg dL-1) than those in HCC group(17.94-23.57 mg dL-1). Total VFA concentration were not affected by wilting  nor by the type of concentrates  (P > 0.05). Goats in the HCC group,however,numerically have higher total VFA concentration (178.5-183.75 mmol L-1) than those in the HPC group (142.21-174.64 mmol L-1). The apparent digestibility coeficients  of DM, OM, CP and energy of the diet were not different (P > 0.05) when contained wilted or fresh Indigofera foliage.  Significant increases (P < 0.05)   in the DM and  OM, but not in the CP and energy  apparent digestibility coeficients were observed in the HPC goats. Dry matter intakes were not different (P > 0.05) among dietary treatments, but the ADG of goats in the HCC group (60-63 g d-1) were significantly lower (P < 0.05) than those  of goats in the HPC treatment (80-87 g d-1). Blood glucosa concentration was not affected by wilting nor by type of concentrates (P > 0.05).  BUN was not affected by wilting process, but providing high protein concentrates significantly (P < 0.05) increased the BUN concentration. It is concluded that foliage of Indigofera sp could be used as the sole forage in intensive production of goats. Wilting the foliage prior to feeding seemed to be unnecessary, since this process does not improve the animal productivity in term of daily gain and efficiency of feed utilization. Key Words: Indigofera sp, Supplements,  Ruminal Fermentation, Goats
Leaf area, chlorophyll content, and relative growth rate of grass on different shading and fertilization Sirait, Juniar
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 13, No 2 (2008): JUNE 2008
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (97.943 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i2.603

Abstract

Plant morphology and physiology such as leaf area, total chlorophyll, and chlorophyll a/b ratio were affected by shading and fertilization. An experiment was conducted in Indonesian Research Institute for Animal Production (IRIAP) Ciawi, West Java. The objective of this study was to determine the morphology and physiology adaptation of three short grasses species for grazing namely Paspalum notatum, Brachiaria humidicola, Stenotaphrum secundatum on different shading and fertilization level. The experiment was arranged in split-split plot design. The main plot was shading level (0, 38, 56%); sub-plot was fertilizer dosage (0, 100, and 200 kg N/ha) while sub-sub plot was grass species. The results showed that leaf area were significantly different on different grass species, and there was interaction between shading and species on total leaf area. P. notatum on 38% shading level has the highest total leaf area (240.2 cm2). S. secundatum and P. notatum had a better adaptation in shading area compared to B. humidicola by increasing of total chlorophyll and decreasing of chlorophyll a/b ratio. Relative growth rate (RGR) of P. notatum and S. secundatum were increased by the increasing shading level. On the other hand relative growth rate of B. humidicola was decreased by the increasing  shading level. Leaf area, chlorophyll content, and RGR were not significantly affected by fertilization dosage. Key Words: Shading, Fertilization, Adaptation, Growth, Chlorophyll
The utilization of alfalfa that planted at Tobasa highland, North Sumatra for growing Boerka goat feed Sirait, Juniar; Tarigan, A.; Simanihuruk, K.
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 16, No 4 (2011): DECEMBER 2011
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (447.718 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v16i4.626

Abstract

Alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) is a herbaceus legume which is potential to be used as goat feed for it’s high production and nutritive value. This research was aimed to study the adaptation of alfalfa planted at highland-moderate climate and it’s utilization for goat feed. This research concists of two activities, ie 1) Agronomy of alfalfa that adapted to highland as a goat feed resource, and 2) The alfalfa usage technology as goat feed. On the first activity alfalfa was planted on highland-moderate climate Gurgur, Tobasa District, North Sumatra Province. Data was collected included: growth percentage, morphology and production aspects, and nutritive value. The harvesting was conducted for three times, where the first cutting had done at 100 days after planting. Investigation of morphology characterirtics was done before alfalfa harvesting. The utilization of alfalfa as goat feed was carried out on the second activity which was arranged in a completely randomized design. Twenty male Boer x Kacang crossbred  (Boerka) goats of 5-6 months of age with average body weight 14.2±0.8 kg were randomly assigned to four feed treatments where each treatment consited of five replications. The four feed treatments were: P1 = 100% grass + 0% alfalfa; P2 = 90% grass + 10% alfalfa, P3 = 80% grass + 20% alfalfa, and P4 = 70% grass + 30% alfalfa. Data observation included dry matter intake, average daily gain, feed efficiency, and income over feed cost. Results showed that alfalfa growth percentage was 65% with good growth and high either production or nutritive value. The average shoot dry matter production was 438.6 g/m2 which was equivalent to 26.3 t/ha/yr. The crude protein content of alfalfa on the first, second and third harvesting were 17.93; 21.89 and 17.73 per cent, respectively. The utilization of alfalfa that had been processed to be crude-meal can be applied as goat feed. Supplementation of 70% grass and 30% alfalfa meal showed the best results: ADG 59.17 g/d, feed efficiency 0.14, and IOFC Rp 736/h/d. Key Words: Alfalfa, Herbage, Production, Meal, Feed, Goat